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Chronic Medical Condition clinical trials at University of California Health

2 in progress, 1 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Validation of an Automated Online Language Interpreting Tool - Phase Two.

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    There is a pressing national need to provide higher-quality, more effectively accessible language interpretation services to improve the health outcomes of Americans who have limited English proficiency (LEP). This project addresses a critical component of this problem: The need to improve access to high quality, mental health services for diverse populations by improving the flow of clinical work across care settings (primary care and specialty care) through the use of innovative online asynchronous methods of language interpretation and clinical communication. The investigators are conducting a two phase study. The first phase is completed and involved developing and testing the interpreting tool. The second phase of the research is a clinical trial to compare two methods of cross-language psychiatric assessment.

    at UC Davis

  • FACE-PC: Family-Centered Care for Older Adults With Depression and Chronic Medical Conditions in Primary Care

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Comorbid depression and multiple medical conditions in older adults are a serious public health problem. As an important facilitator of health-related activities, families are already involved in various aspects of self-management of chronic disease in older adults. Despite the benefits they provide, informal caregiving activities currently are organized outside the medical system, which potentially creates redundant or misaligned efforts.The purpose of the mentored research is to examine the feasibility and acceptability of the FACE-PC, a theory-driven, multi- component, technology-assisted interdisciplinary team-based care model that systematically involves family in chronic disease management. It aims to optimize the patient and family's collective ability to self-manage chronic disease.

    at UCSF

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