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Premature Infant clinical trials at UC Health
10 in progress, 7 open to eligible people

  • A Cohort Study of the Intestinal Microbiota of Premature Infants

    open to all eligible people

    Premature infants are at risk for a variety of diseases, the investigators would like to learn more about why some premature babies are at higher risk and some are protected from these diseases. Scientists at UC Davis and other universities have developed new ways to measure the bacteria and a large number of small molecules in specimens of infant blood, urine, stomach fluid and poop and in mother's milk. These discoveries allow us to consider questions that were impossible to answer before these new techniques were developed. One such question is whether the bacteria in the poop of a premature baby can help us predict the baby's risk for developing infection or a common and serious disease of premature infants called necrotizing enterocolitis. A second question is whether the DNA of a premature baby (obtained from saliva with a q-tip) can predict higher risk for diseases of premature babies.

    at UC Davis

  • A Study of Applying Prechtl's Assessment of General Movements for Preterm Infants Through Telemedicine

    open to all eligible people

    The investigators will implement a study to evaluate the hypothesis that applying General Movements Assessments (GMA) in a telemedicine setting with real-time scoring is feasible and comparable to scoring video recordings.

    at UC Davis

  • Follow-up Visit of High Risk Infants

    open to eligible people ages 18 months to 26 months

    The NICHD Neonatal Research Network's Follow-Up study is a multi-center cohort in which surviving extremely low birth-weight infants born in participating network centers receive neurodevelopmental, neurosensory and functional assessments at 22-26 months corrected age (Infants born prior to July 1, 2012 were seen at 18-22 months corrected age). Data regarding pregnancy and neonatal outcome are collected prospectively. The goal is to identify potential maternal and neonatal risk factors that may affect infant neurodevelopment.

    at UCLA UCSD

  • Improving Preterm Infant Outcomes With Family Integrated Care and Mobile Technology

    open to all eligible people

    The purpose of this study is to compare the standard of care in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), known as Family Centered Care, to a new model of care, called mobile enhanced Family Integrated Care. This exploratory two-group comparison study will examine the feasibility, acceptability and effectiveness, providing the first United States (US) information about outcomes of a new NICU care model that better integrates parents into all aspects of their baby's care. The use of mobile technology as part of this new model of care could improve access and equity in family integration for the many US families who face barriers to NICU involvement.

    at UCLA UCSD UCSF

  • The Milk, Growth and Microbiota Study

    open to all eligible people

    Late preterm infants, who are born at 34, 35 or 36 weeks gestation, often have difficulty feeding, establishing growth, and fighting off infection. Breastfeeding provides improved nutrition to help fight infection, in part because breast milk encourages the growth of healthy bacteria (microbiota) in the infant's intestine. However, when mothers give birth preterm, their breasts are usually not quite ready to make milk; it can take several days to have enough breast milk to match a baby's nutritional needs. If there is not yet enough breast milk, formula is often used. However, formula can interfere with the growth of healthy intestinal bacteria. An alternate nutritional option is donor milk from a certified milk bank, which is available in all neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in San Francisco. However, no scientific studies have yet studied donor milk for late preterm infants, so currently all San Francisco NICUs (as well as the large majority of NICUs nationwide) reserve donor milk for infants born at <34 weeks. This study's investigators therefore propose the "Milk, Growth and Microbiota (MGM) Study," a randomized controlled trial to compare banked donor milk to formula for breastfeeding late preterm infants born in San Francisco. Once enrolled in MGM, infants will be randomly assigned to receive either formula or banked donor milk if they need additional nutrition until their mothers are making enough milk. After enrolling the babies, investigators will weigh them daily to assess their growth. The investigators will also collect infant bowel movements at baseline, 1 week and 1 month to determine whether donor milk vs. formula impacts the type of bacteria in the baby's intestine. If the study's results show that donor milk optimizes growth while helping establish healthy bacteria in the baby's intestine, donor milk might be postnatal strategy to bolster neonatal nutrition for late preterm infants.

    at UC Davis UCSF

  • Timing of Inguinal Hernia Repair in Premature Infants

    open to all eligible people

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether early (before NICU discharge) or late (55-60 weeks post-menstrual age) inguinal hernia repair is safer for premature infants who have an inguinal hernia.

    at UCLA UCSD

  • Two Year Developmental Follow-up for PREMOD2 Trial (Premature Infants Receiving Milking or Delayed Cord Clamping)

    open to eligible people ages 22 months to 26 months

    An extension of the PREMOD2 trial, the PREMOD2 Follow-Up trial will evaluate the neurodevelopmental outcomes at 22-26 months corrected age of preterm children who received UCM or DCC.

    at UCSD

  • Hydrocortisone for BPD

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The Hydrocortisone and Extubation study will test the safety and efficacy of a 10 day course of hydrocortisone for infants who are less than 30 weeks estimated gestational age and who are intubated at 14-28 days of life. Infants will be randomized to receive hydrocortisone or placebo. This study will determine if hydrocortisone improves infants'survival without moderate or severe BPD and will be associated with improvement in survival without moderate or severe neurodevelopmental impairment at 22 - 26 months corrected age.

    at UCLA

  • Laparotomy vs. Drainage for Infants With Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This trial will compare the effectiveness of two surgical procedures -laparotomy versus drainage - commonly used to treat necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) or isolated intestinal perforations (IP) in extremely low birth weight infants (≤1,000 g). Infants diagnosed with NEC or IP requiring surgical intervention, will be recruited. Subjects will be randomized to receive either a laparotomy or peritoneal drainage. Primary outcome is impairment-free survival at 18-22 months corrected age.

    at UCLA

  • VentFirst: A Study of Assisted Ventilation During Delayed Cord Clamping for Extremely Preterm Infants

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether providing ventilatory assistance prior to umbilical cord clamping influences the occurrence of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) in extremely preterm (EPT) infants, compared to standard care of providing ventilatory assistance after cord clamping.

    at UC Davis

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