Summary

Eligibility
for people ages 4 months and up (full criteria)
Location
at UCLA
Dates
study started
estimated completion
Principal Investigator
by Peter G Szilagyi, MD MPH (ucla)
Photo of Peter G Szilagyi
Peter G Szilagyi

Description

Summary

This trial is taking place in Los Angeles, CA among patients from primary care practices within the UCLA Health System. The study design is a 2x2x2 factorial design, nested in a parallel 2-arm trial. The parallel arms are control v. reminder letter (reminder messages sent via the patient portal, reminding participants of an overdue influenza vaccine) Nested within the reminder letter arm, we will have 3 additional components: - A direct scheduling link within the reminder letter enabling the patient to schedule an influenza vaccine only visit (direct scheduling link vs. no direct scheduling link). - A pre-commitment prompt (pre-commitment prompt vs. no prompt) asking about a patient's intention to get the influenza vaccination - A pre-appointment reminder, encouraging patients to ask for their influenza vaccine at their upcoming appointment (pre-appointment reminder encouraging influenza vaccination vs. standard pre-appointment reminder not mentioning influenza vaccination)

Official Title

Patient Portal Reminder/Recall for Influenza Vaccination in a Health System- RCT 3

Details

This trial is taking place in Los Angeles, CA among patients from primary care practices within the UCLA Health System, using 2x2x2 factorial design, nested in a parallel 2-arm trial.

Sub-optimal vaccination rates are a significant problem in the U.S., despite their effectiveness in preventing morbidity and mortality from vaccine-preventable illness. For influenza specifically, annual epidemics of influenza cause substantial morbidity in the U.S. with up to 40,00-80,000 deaths/year and many hospitalizations, emergency and outpatient visits, and significant costs.

Reminder/recall (R/R) messages, sent by phone, mail or other modality, can improve child and adult influenza vaccination rates. However, the majority of pediatric or adult primary care practices to not conduct R/R. Barriers are lack of finances, personnel, and algorithms to identify eligible patients.

A technological breakthrough that might overcome these barriers involves patient portals-- secure, web-based communication systems, embedded within electronic health records (EHRs), for patients and providers to communicate with each other via email and the internet. Portals are used by about half of Americans and half of UCLA patients.

This randomized controlled trial will assess the effectiveness of reminders messages, encouraging influenza vaccination, sent to patient portal users on increasing influenza vaccination rates within a health system by randomizing patients to two groups: 1) two-thirds of patients will receive reminder letters, 2) one-third will not receive reminders.

Patients in the reminder arm will be further randomized (separately) for three additional components: 1) direct appointment scheduling, 2) pre-commitment prompts and 3) pre-appointment reminders.

Direct scheduling: The convenience of scheduling an appointment for influenza vaccination may increase the likelihood that patients receive an influenza vaccination. Patients receiving reminders will be randomized to receive one of two types of reminder letters: 1) one half will receive flu vaccine reminder letters with a link to the MyChart direct appointment scheduling page and 2) one half will receive flu vaccine reminder message without the direct appointment scheduling link.

Pre-commitment: Another potential influence on the decision to vaccinate is pre-commitment. Previous studies suggest that, upon being prompted, indicating an intention to do something increases the likelihood of following through. Patients will be randomized to one of two groups: 1) one half will receive pre-commitment prompt at the beginning of influenza vaccination season and 2) one half will not receive a pre-commitment prompt. The pre-commitment prompt asks whether the patient intends to receive influenza vaccine, and where and when they plan to get the vaccine.

Pre-appointment flu reminders: Finally, a missed opportunities for vaccination occurs when patients are eligible for vaccination but are not offered a vaccine at their medical appointment. Pre-appointment reminders, sent in advance of an upcoming appointment, encouraging the patient talk to their doctor about influenza vaccination, may increase the likelihood of that patient receiving a vaccine. Patients will be randomized to one of two groups: 1) one half will receive modified pre-appointment reminders that mention influenza vaccination and 2) one half will receive the standard pre-appointment reminders for an upcoming appointment (no mention of influenza vaccination).

Keywords

Influenza Respiratory Tract Infections Vaccination Reminder recall Patient Portal Influenza, Human Vaccines Pre-Commitment Prompt Direct scheduling + Pre-commitment + Pre-appt reminder Direct scheduling + Pre-commitment Direct scheduling + Pre-appt reminder Direct scheduling

Eligibility

You can join if…

Open to people ages 4 months and up

A patient within the UCLA Health System identified as a primary care patient per an internal algorithm.

You CAN'T join if...

A patient within the UCLA Health System not identified as a primary care patient per an internal algorithm

Location

  • University of California LA
    Los Angeles California 99095 United States

Lead Scientist at UC Health

  • Peter G Szilagyi, MD MPH (ucla)
    Dr. Peter Szilagyi is a pediatric health services and clinical researcher with an overall mission to improve access to healthcare, quality of care, and health outcomes for children.

Details

Status
not yet accepting patients
Start Date
Completion Date
(estimated)
Sponsor
University of California, Los Angeles
ID
NCT04533685
Study Type
Interventional
Last Updated