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ACL Injury clinical trials at University of California Health

6 in progress, 2 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Adductor Canal Block Versus Femoral Block on Pain and Quadriceps Strength

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to compare the effects of a femoral nerve block vs. an adductor canal block on pain and quadriceps muscle strength for knee arthroscopy surgery.

    at UCSF

  • Biologic Therapy to Prevent Osteoarthritis After ACL Injury

    open to eligible people ages 18-35

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are extremely common. On average, 50% of individuals suffering an ACL injury will develop radiographic osteoarthritis (OA) 10 to 20 years after injury. Unfortunately, ACL reconstruction does not prevent risk of future OA. Interleukin-1 (IL-1) levels in the human knee joint increase transiently after an ACL injury. In animal experiments, if interleukin-1 levels are increased in the joint, this alone causes arthritis to occur. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) is a naturally occurring inhibitor of IL-1. However, in ACL injuries the balance of these two proteins is disturbed transiently after injury, with the effects of IL-1 dominating this balance. In a large animal model of ACL injury, injection of IL-1Ra into the knee joint after ACL injury significantly decreased the amount of arthritis that was later observed. Thus, the investigators hypothesize that early injection of IL-1 inhibitor (IL-1Ra) into the knee joint of patients suffering recent ACL injury will decrease the incidence of cartilage damage later in life. After appropriate IRB approval, a total of 32 active patients will be randomized into one of two treatment groups. Group 1 will receive removal of the knee joint fluid (aspiration of hemarthrosis) using a needle and syringe within 1 to 2 weeks of injury. Following aspiration of the knee joint, an injection of 5 milliliters (mls) of sterile saline (as a placebo control) will be administered. In addition, a second knee aspiration procedure and an injection of 5mls of sterile saline into the injured knee joint will be performed at 3 to 5 days after the initial injection. Group 2 will receive aspiration of the knee hemarthrosis as described in group 1 as well as intra-articular administration of 150mg (~5mls) of anakinra (rhIL-1Ra) within 1 to 2 weeks of ACL injury. In addition, a second knee aspiration and intra-articular administration of 150mg (~5mls) of anakinra (rhIL-1Ra) will be performed at 3 to 5 days after the initial injection. Thus, all patients in this randomized placebo-controlled trial will undergo two injection procedures prior to surgery. Investigators will analyze subjects self-reported function and pain scores as well as urinary levels of cartilage breakdown products over time. Additionally, MRI studies will be used to compare MRI findings among patients in these 2 treatment groups. Urine samples will be obtain prior to surgery, at the time of surgery and at multiple time points after surgery (3, 6, 9, 12 and 24 months after surgery). Subjective outcome measure assessments (surveys) will be completed by participants prior to surgery and then again at 6, 9, 12 and 24 months post-operatively. MRI studies will be obtained at 1 year and 2 years following surgery. Additional, MRI studies at time points are optional and highly encouraged. These additional MRIs are at no cost to the patient.

    at UCLA

  • Effectiveness of iPACK on Postoperative Pain From Hamstring Autograft Following ACL Repair

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Patients undergoing ACL repair with hamstring autograft frequently develop significant post operative pain at the hamstring grafting site. This pain is within the distribution of a commonly used regional nerve block, the Interspace between the popliteal artery and capsule of the knee (iPACK). The investigators plan to randomize consenting patients to either receiving a SHAM injection of normal saline or to an interventional group of long acting local anesthetic (Ropivacaine) injected in the popliteal fossa between the popliteal artery and capsule of the knee (iPACK). Both groups of patients will receive standard of care with respect to perioperative pain management, which includes a preoperative adductor canal nerve block and preoperative acetaminophen administration. Dual primary endpoints of postoperative pain scores and mean postoperative opioid use will be retrieved and compared between groups. Additional secondary endpoints will be PACU length of stay, PACU opioid use, POD1 opioids use, and POD1 pain scores (best, worst, average).

    at UCSD

  • Pain Management After ACL Reconstruction Surgery

    “Do you have an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and are scheduled to undergo reconstructive surgery?”

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    This study will compare the outcome of pain interventions that are considered standard of care during the surgical treatment of ACL injuries. The comparison will be looking at pain control during and after ACL surgery as well as functional outcomes in patients that had a nerve block versus those who did not. The investigators hypothesize that pain control will be equal between both groups.

    at UC Davis

  • STABILITY 2: Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction +/- Lateral Tenodesis With Patellar vs Quad Tendon

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is one of the most common musculoskeletal injuries in young individuals, particularly those that are active in sports. Up to 30% of individuals under the age of 20 years suffer a re-injury to the reconstructed ACL. Revision ACLR has been associated with degeneration of the articular cartilage and increased rates of meniscal tears, increasing the risk of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA), additional surgical procedures, reduced physical function and quality of life. As such, strategies to reduce ACLR failure, particularly in young active individuals, are critical to improving short and long-term outcomes after ACL rupture. There is ongoing debate about the optimal graft choice and reconstructive technique. Three autograft options are commonly used, including the bone-patellar-tendon-bone (BPTB), quadriceps tendon (QT) and hamstring tendon (HT). Additionally, a lateral extra-articular tenodesis (LET) may provide greater stability to the ACLR; however, its effect on failure rate is unclear and surgery-induced lateral compartment OA is a concern. To definitively inform the choice of autograft and the need for a LET, this multicenter, international randomized clinical trial will randomly assign 1236 young, active patients at high risk of re-injury to undergo ACLR using BPTB or QT autograft with our without LET.

    at UCSF

  • Multicenter ACL Revision Study (MARS)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of modifiable risk factors on patient-reported quality of life, physical activity levels, and risk of early osteoarthritis following revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The investigators hypothesize that modifiable variables exist at the time of revision ACL reconstruction (e.g., cause of failure, current graft source and type, surgical exposure, and femoral and tibial tunnel position) which will be predictors of patient-reported outcomes.

    at UCLA UCSF

Our lead scientists for ACL Injury research studies include .

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