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Acute Kidney Injury clinical trials at University of California Health

8 in progress, 3 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Acute Normovolemic Hemodilution in Complex Cardiac Surgery

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Postoperative bleeding in cardiac surgery is a frequent complication, and cardiac surgery utilizes 15-20% of the national blood supply. Packed red blood cells (pRBCs) are associated with worse short and long term outcomes. For each unit transfused, there is an additive risk of mortality (death) and cardiac adverse events. Despite current guidelines and numerous approaches to bleeding reduction, >50% of the patients undergoing cardiac surgery receive transfusions. Acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH), a blood conservation technique that removes whole blood from a patient immediately prior to surgery, could be a valuable method to reduce transfusion in complex cardiac surgery. At the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), ANH is routinely utilized in patients who refuse allogenic blood transfusions such as Jehovah's Witnesses. ANH has been shown to be safe with minimal risk to patients. ANH has been studied in simple cardiac surgery, such as coronary artery bypass grafting, however it has not been studied in complex cardiac surgery, such as aortic surgery and adult congenital heart disease. ANH has been demonstrated to reduce pRBC transfusion in lower risk cardiac surgery without any significant complications. Complex heart surgery utilizes more blood products. This study could identify the benefits of ANH in a higher risk surgical group.

    at UCLA

  • Liberation From Acute Dialysis

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The goal of the LIBERATE-D clinical trial is to improve outcomes for patients recovering from dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury (AKI-D). The impact of a conservative dialysis strategy compared to standard clinical practice of thrice-weekly dialysis will be examined to help generate knowledge for how to guide delivery of dialysis to facilitate renal recovery.

    at UCSF

  • KIDney Injury in Times of COVID-19 (KIDCOV)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    There is an unmet need to evaluate the impact of sub-clinical/mild COVID19 disease in the outpatient setting on prevalent and incident renal injury, as this data is currently unavailable. To capture the diversity of race/ethnic risk and COVID19 related municipal shelter-in-place guidance, the investigators will enroll COVID19-negative and COVID19-positive samples balanced by race/ethnicity from 3 different states, California, Michigan, and Illinois. Study endpoints will be assayed from urine samples mailed to the study team at 2, 6, and 12 months after their date of PCR test, with no requirement for these individuals to leave their homes to participate.

    at UCSF

  • Angiotensin 2 for AKI After OLT

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    Kidney injury is a common complication following liver transplantation and is associated with a higher complication rate and increased risk of death. While there are many factors that likely contribute to kidney injury in the perioperative period, a relative low serum level of angiotensin 2 (Ang 2) (a protein hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow) found in patients with liver cirrhosis (late stage of liver damage) may increase their risk of developing acute kidney injury (sudden episode of kidney failure or damage). We propose to investigate how early administration of Ang 2, a new vasopressor drug approved by the FDA in December 2017 for patients with low blood pressure, during the intra-operative period of liver transplant surgery affects the rate of kidney injury after transplantation. Patients who are deemed appropriate candidates for the study will be randomized 1:1 to the treatment and control groups. The intervention period of the study will occur in the operating room during transplant surgery and will be performed by their anesthesiologists. In the Treatment group, patients will receive Ang 2 infusions in addition to other standard vasopressors while patients in the control group will receive standard vasopressors alone. The infusion of Ang 2 in the treatment group will continue through the duration of the surgery and will be stopped prior to leaving the operating room. Both the treatment group and the control group will then be followed for 14 days to evaluate rates of kidney injury and to look for any complications. The follow up period will be extended to 28 days to look at in-hospital mortality rates in both groups. The daily follow up analysis will occur while the enrolled patients are inpatient following their transplantation surgery and will be done by looking at lab values and other data that is routinely gathered by their managing teams. This study will serve as a pilot study to evaluate feasibility of our protocol and to collect some preliminary data on the use of Ang 2 in this patient population. As such we plan to enroll approximately 30 patients who have accepted an offer to receive a donor liver. We hope to reach our goal enrollment within 5 months of starting the study.

    at UCLA

  • ARTEMIS: Ravulizumab to Protect Patients With CKD From CSA-AKI and MAKE

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The primary objective of this study is to assess the efficacy of a single dose of ravulizumab IV compared with placebo in reducing the risk of the clinical consequences of AKI (MAKE) at 90 days in adult participants with CKD who undergo non-emergent cardiac surgery with CPB.

    at UCSF

  • NEPH-ROSIS (NEPHrology in CirRhOSIS) Pilot Trial: A Trial to Treat Acute Kidney Injury Among Hospitalized Cirrhosis Patients

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The goal of this pilot, randomized, single-blind clinical trial is to estimate the effect size of a high and low mean arterial pressure (MAP)-target algorithm among cirrhosis patients hospitalized with acute kidney injury. The main aims to answer are: • Does an algorithm that has low (<80 mmHg) and high (≥80) MAP-targets lead to significant differences in mean arterial pressure? • Are there any serious adverse events (e.g., ischemia) in a high blood pressure algorithm as compared to a low blood pressure algorithm? • Are there any differences in the incidence of AKI reversal in the high v. low MAP-target groups? Participants will be: 1) Randomized to a clinical algorithm that will either target a low (<80 mmHg) or high (≥80 mmHg) MAP. 2) Depending on their group, investigators will titrate commonly used medications to a specific MAP target. Researchers will compare the high and low MAP-target groups to see if these algorithms lead to significant changes in MAP, if they have any impact on AKI reversal, and if there are any adverse events in the high MAP-target group.

    at UCSF

  • Suramin in Subjects With Furosemide-Resistant AKI

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study to assess the effects of suramin as a potential treatment option to prevent subjects with AKI from progressing to Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) Stage III or dialysis dependent AKI.

    at UCLA

  • Transfusion Trigger After Operations in High Cardiac Risk Patients

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The goal of the proposed study is to determine whether a liberal transfusion strategy (transfusion trigger at Hb < 10 gm/dl) in Veterans at high cardiac risk who undergo major open vascular and general surgery operations is associated with decreased risk of adverse postoperative outcomes compared to a restrictive transfusion strategy (transfusion trigger at Hb < 7 gm/dl).

    at UCSF

Our lead scientists for Acute Kidney Injury research studies include .

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