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Acute Kidney Injury clinical trials at University of California Health

12 in progress, 6 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • (Revival) Study to Investigate the Efficacy and Safety of Alkaline Phosphatase in Patients With Sepsis-Associated AKI

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Clinical phase 3 study to investigate the effect of recAP on 28 day mortality in patients admitted to the ICU with acute kidney injury that is caused by sepsis. The study has three distinct SA-AKI trial populations: 1. The main trial population: Patients with a pre-AKI reference eGFR ≥45 mL/min/1.73 m2 and no proven or suspected SARS-CoV-2 at time of randomization. 2. A 'moderate' CKD population: Patients with a pre-AKI reference eGFR ≥25 and <45 mL/min/1.73 m2 and no proven or suspected SARS-CoV-2 at time of randomization. 3. A Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) population: Patients with proven or suspected SARS-CoV-2 at time of randomization with or without 'moderate' CKD. For patients in this population, COVID-19 should be the main cause of SA-AKI. In the main study population approximately 1400 patients will be enrolled and in the two cohorts with moderate CKD and COVID-19 each up to 100 patients. There are two arms in the study, one with active treatment and one with an inactive compound (placebo). Treatment is by 1 hour intravenous infusion, for three days. Patients are followed up for 28 days to see if there is an improvement on mortality, and followed for 90 and 180 days for mortality and other outcomes e.g. long-term kidney function and quality of life.

    at UCLA

  • Acute Normovolemic Hemodilution in Complex Cardiac Surgery

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Postoperative bleeding in cardiac surgery is a frequent complication, and cardiac surgery utilizes 15-20% of the national blood supply. Packed red blood cells (pRBCs) are associated with worse short and long term outcomes. For each unit transfused, there is an additive risk of mortality (death) and cardiac adverse events. Despite current guidelines and numerous approaches to bleeding reduction, >50% of the patients undergoing cardiac surgery receive transfusions. Acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH), a blood conservation technique that removes whole blood from a patient immediately prior to surgery, could be a valuable method to reduce transfusion in complex cardiac surgery. At the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), ANH is routinely utilized in patients who refuse allogenic blood transfusions such as Jehovah's Witnesses. ANH has been shown to be safe with minimal risk to patients. ANH has been studied in simple cardiac surgery, such as coronary artery bypass grafting, however it has not been studied in complex cardiac surgery, such as aortic surgery and adult congenital heart disease. ANH has been demonstrated to reduce pRBC transfusion in lower risk cardiac surgery without any significant complications. Complex heart surgery utilizes more blood products. This study could identify the benefits of ANH in a higher risk surgical group.

    at UCLA

  • KIDney Injury in Times of COVID-19 (KIDCOV)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    There is an unmet need to evaluate the impact of sub-clinical/mild COVID19 disease in the outpatient setting on prevalent and incident renal injury, as this data is currently unavailable. To capture the diversity of race/ethnic risk and COVID19 related municipal shelter-in-place guidance, the investigators will enroll COVID19-negative and COVID19-positive samples balanced by race/ethnicity from 3 different states, California, Michigan, and Illinois. Study endpoints will be assayed from urine samples mailed to the study team at 2, 6, and 12 months after their date of PCR test, with no requirement for these individuals to leave their homes to participate.

    at UCSF

  • Liberation From Acute Dialysis

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The goal of the LIBERATE-D clinical trial is to improve outcomes for patients recovering from dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury (AKI-D). The impact of a conservative dialysis strategy compared to standard clinical practice of thrice-weekly dialysis will be examined to help generate knowledge for how to guide delivery of dialysis to facilitate renal recovery.

    at UCSF

  • Mild Hypothermia and Acute Kidney Injury in Liver Transplantation

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Acute kidney injury (AKI), or worsening kidney function, is a common complication after liver transplantation (20-90% in published studies). Patients who experience AKI after liver transplantation have higher mortality, increased graft loss, longer hospital and intensive care unit stays, and more progression to chronic kidney disease compared with those who do not. In this study, half of the participants will have their body temperature cooled to slightly lower than normal (mild hypothermia) for a portion of the liver transplant operation, while the other half will have their body temperature maintained at normal. The study will evaluate if mild hypothermia protects from AKI during liver transplantation.

    at UCSF

  • Transfusion Trigger After Operations in High Cardiac Risk Patients

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The goal of the proposed study is to determine whether a liberal transfusion strategy (transfusion trigger at Hb < 10 gm/dl) in Veterans at high cardiac risk who undergo major open vascular and general surgery operations is associated with decreased risk of adverse postoperative outcomes compared to a restrictive transfusion strategy (transfusion trigger at Hb < 7 gm/dl).

    at UCSF

  • A Clinical Decision Support Trial to Reduce Intraoperative Hypotension

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    The purpose of this study is to provide messages to providers if their patient is at high risk of developing intraoperative hypotension based on past medical history and co-morbidities preoperatively and minutes of hypotension intraoperatively.

    at UCLA

  • Angiotensin 2 for AKI After OLT

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Kidney injury is a common complication following liver transplantation and is associated with a higher complication rate and increased risk of death. While there are many factors that likely contribute to kidney injury in the perioperative period, a relative low serum level of angiotensin 2 (Ang 2) (a protein hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow) found in patients with liver cirrhosis (late stage of liver damage) may increase their risk of developing acute kidney injury (sudden episode of kidney failure or damage). We propose to investigate how early administration of Ang 2, a new vasopressor drug approved by the FDA in December 2017 for patients with low blood pressure, during the intra-operative period of liver transplant surgery affects the rate of kidney injury after transplantation. Patients who are deemed appropriate candidates for the study will be randomized 1:1 to the treatment and control groups. The intervention period of the study will occur in the operating room during transplant surgery and will be performed by their anesthesiologists. In the Treatment group, patients will receive Ang 2 infusions in addition to other standard vasopressors while patients in the control group will receive standard vasopressors alone. The infusion of Ang 2 in the treatment group will continue through the duration of the surgery and will be stopped prior to leaving the operating room. Both the treatment group and the control group will then be followed for 14 days to evaluate rates of kidney injury and to look for any complications. The follow up period will be extended to 28 days to look at in-hospital mortality rates in both groups. The daily follow up analysis will occur while the enrolled patients are inpatient following their transplantation surgery and will be done by looking at lab values and other data that is routinely gathered by their managing teams. This study will serve as a pilot study to evaluate feasibility of our protocol and to collect some preliminary data on the use of Ang 2 in this patient population. As such we plan to enroll approximately 30 patients who have accepted an offer to receive a donor liver. We hope to reach our goal enrollment within 5 months of starting the study.

    at UCLA

  • Global Assessment of Acute and Chronic Kidney Disease Incidence and Outcomes in Patients With COVID-19 Infection

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has created a significant strain on health care resources across the world for managing critically ill patients. Emerging reports from China, South Korea and Italy have reported varying incidence of acute kidney (AKI) ranging from 5-15% with a mortality of 60-80% however there is no systematic assessment of the risk factors, recognition, course and outcomes in patients with and without kidney disease whose course is complicated by AKI1-4. Patients with underlying CKD, immunosuppressed patients with renal transplants and ESKD patients are at high risk for COVID-19 infection and there is limited information on the effect of COVID-19 on the course and outcomes of these patients. The requirement for renal support including IHD, CRRT and sorbent based therapies has been variable and has contributed to the intense pressure on the nephrology and critical care providers for delivering these therapies. As the COVID-19 pandemic expands in the USA and abroad, there is an intense need to understand the epidemiology of the disease and the resources needed for renal support to inform clinical management and public health interventions. In this study, the investigators aim to investigate health care facilities across the world (hospital wards, ICU, outpatient clinics, nursing homes, healthcare centers) to draw a global picture of incidence, risk factors, resources available for treatment and prognosis of acute and chronic kidney disease in patient with COVID 19 confirmed infection. The aim is to identify trends in patients with acute and chronic kidney disease, determine its incidence, treatment and outcomes in different settings across the world. This information will be used to develop and implement educational tools and resources to prevent deaths from AKI and progression of CKD in this and following pandemics.

    at UCSD

  • LSALT Peptide vs. Placebo to Prevent ARDS and Acute Kidney Injury in Patients Infected With SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    To evaluate the proportion of subjects alive and free of respiratory failure (e.g. need for non-invasive or invasive mechanical ventilation, high flow oxygen, or ECMO) and free of the need for continued renal replacement therapy (RRT) on Day 28. The need for continued RRT at Day 28 will be defined as either dialysis in the past 3 days (Day 26, 27, or 28) or an eGFR on Day 28 <10 mL/min/1.73 m2.

    at UCSD

  • Physiologic Signals and Signatures With the Accuryn Monitoring System - The Accuryn Registry

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The Accuryn Registry Study is an open-ended, global, multi-center, retrospective and prospective, single-arm data collection study with an FDA cleared device. The target population are cardiovascular surgery patients. Physiologic data measurements will be collected from enrolled subjects using electronic medical records and data streams via the Accuryn Monitoring System.

    at UCSF

  • The Effect of Loop Diuretics on Severity and Outcome of Acute Kidney Injury

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The primary objective is to safely determine if the investigators can identify the severity of Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) early in the course of the disease. Once enrolled the investigators will draw blood and urine for novel and standard biomarkers. The investigators are attempting to determine if these biomarkers can forecast the course of AKI (need for dialysis, death and renal recovery). The investigators seek to determine how well physicians caring for those with AKI can predict the clinical course compared to these novel biomarkers of AKI and if there is an association between clinical course and 3 year patient outcomes.

    at UCSF

Our lead scientists for Acute Kidney Injury research studies include .

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