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Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia clinical trials at UC Health
45 in progress, 18 open to new patients

  • A Multicenter Access and Distribution Protocol for Unlicensed Cryopreserved Cord Blood Units (CBUs)

    “Assessing new blood cells growth after transplant using cord blood units that do not meet FDA guidelines but meet NMDP guidelines”

    open to all eligible people

    This study is an access and distribution protocol for unlicensed cryopreserved cord blood units (CBUs) in pediatric and adult patients with hematologic malignancies and other indications.

    at UCSF UCSD UCLA UC Davis

  • A Phase 2 Study of Ruxolitinib With Chemotherapy in Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 1-21

    This is a nonrandomized study of ruxolitinib in combination with a standard multi-agent chemotherapy regimen for the treatment of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Part 1 of the study will optimize the dose of study drug (ruxolitinib) in combination with the chemotherapy regimen. Part 2 will evaluate the efficacy of combination chemotherapy and ruxolitinib at the recommended dose determined in Part 1.

    at UCSF

  • A Study Evaluating KTE-C19 in Adult Subjects With Relapsed/Refractory B-precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (r/r ALL) (ZUMA-3)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The primary objectives of this study are to determine the safety and efficacy of KTE-C19 adult participants with relapsed/refractory (r/r) B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).

    at UCLA UCSF UCSD UC Irvine UC Davis

  • A Trial of Temsirolimus With Etoposide and Cyclophosphamide in Children With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma

    open to eligible people ages 1-21

    This is a phase I study of temsirolimus (Torisel) combined with dexamethasone, cyclophosphamide and etoposide in patients with relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), lymphoblastic lymphoma (LL) or peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTL).

    at UCSF

  • Blinatumomab and Combination Chemotherapy or Dasatinib, Prednisone, and Blinatumomab in Treating Older Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 65 years and up

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well blinatumomab and combination chemotherapy or dasatinib, prednisone, and blinatumomab work in treating older patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, find cancer cells and help kill them. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as prednisone, vincristine sulfate, methotrexate, and mercaptopurine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Dasatinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving blinatumomab with combination chemotherapy or dasatinib and prednisone may kill more cancer cells.

    at UCSD UC Irvine

  • Blinatumomab and Pembrolizumab for Adults With Relapsed/Refractory B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With High Marrow Lymphoblasts

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase I/II study of blinatumomab in combination with pembrolizumab in adult patients with relapsed or refractory B-lineage ALL The primary objective of this study is to determine if the addition of pembrolizumab to blinatumomab improves the overall response rate (CR+ CRh) relative to blinatumomab alone in adult subjects with relapsed or refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with high bone marrow lymphoblast percentage (>50% lymphoblasts).

    at UCSF UCSD UC Irvine

  • Blinatumomab in Treating Younger Patients With Relapsed B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    “Is standard combination chemotherapy more effective than blinatumomab (a type of immunotherapy) in treating leukemia?”

    open to eligible people ages 1-30

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well blinatumomab works compared with standard combination chemotherapy in treating patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed). Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether standard combination chemotherapy is more effective than blinatumomab in treating relapsed B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    at UCSF UC Davis UCLA

  • Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed High-Risk B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Ph-Like TKI Sensitive Mutations

    open to eligible people ages 1-30

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well combination chemotherapy works in treating young patients with newly diagnosed B acute lymphoblastic leukemia that is likely to come back or spread, and in patients with Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-like tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) sensitive mutations. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) and giving the drugs in different doses and in different combinations may kill more cancer cells.

    at UCLA UCSF UC Davis

  • Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Blinatumomab in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed BCR-ABL-Negative B Lineage Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 30-70

    This randomized phase III trial studies combination chemotherapy with blinatumomab to see how well it works compared to induction chemotherapy alone in treating patients with newly diagnosed breakpoint cluster region (BCR)-c-abl oncogene 1, non-receptor tyrosine kinase (ABL)-negative B lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. It is not yet known whether combination chemotherapy is more effective with or without blinatumomab in treating newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    at UCSD UC Irvine

  • Combination Treatment for Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    “Do you have b-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and have relapsed or are no longer responding or benefiting from the treatment?”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies how well ibrutinib and blinatumomab work in treating patients with B acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back or is not responding to treatment. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving ibrutinib and blinatumomab may work better in treating patients with relapsed or refractory B acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    at UC Davis

  • Experimental medicine, Carfilzomib and chemotherapy treatment for newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoma

    “Study looking at side effects and best dose of the study medicine, carfilzomib with approved chemotherapy for treatment of leukemia patients”

    open to eligible people ages 18-64

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of carfilzomib when given together with the hyperfractionated (hyper)-cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate, doxorubicin hydrochloride, and dexamethasone (CVAD) chemotherapy regimen in treating patients with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoma. Carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate, doxorubicin hydrochloride, and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving carfilzomib with combination chemotherapy may kill more cancer cells.

    at UC Davis

  • Imatinib Mesylate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 2-21

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well imatinib mesylate and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients with newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Imatinib mesylate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving imatinib mesylate and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    at UCSF UC Davis

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Frontline Chemotherapy in Treating Young Adults With Newly Diagnosed B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 18-39

    This partially randomized phase III trial studies the side effects of inotuzumab ozogamicin and how well it works when given with frontline chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed B acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Monoclonal antibodies, such as inotuzumab ozogamicin, may block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving inotuzumab ozogamicin with chemotherapy may work better in treating young adults with B acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    at UC Irvine

  • Long-Term Follow-Up of Patients Who Have Participated in Children's Oncology Group Studies

    open to all eligible people

    This clinical trial keeps track of and collects follow-up information from patients who are currently enrolled on or have participated in a Children's Oncology Group study. Developing a way to keep track of patients who have participated in Children's Oncology Group studies may allow doctors learn more about the long-term effects of cancer treatment and help them reduce problems related to treatment and improve patient quality of life.

    at UCLA UC Davis UCSF

  • Study Evaluating KTE-C19 in Pediatric and Adolescent Subjects With Relapsed/Refractory B-precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 2-21

    The primary objectives of this study are to evaluate the safety and efficacy of KTE-C19 in pediatric and adolescent participants with relapsed/refractory (r/r) B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).

    at UCSF

  • Study of ProTmune for Allogeneic HCT in Adult Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    open to eligible people ages 18-70

    This study is a Phase 1, Non-randomized, Open-label/Phase 2 Randomized, Blinded Study of ProTmune (ex vivo programmed mobilized peripheral blood cells) Versus Non-programmed mobilized peripheral blood cells for Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (HCT) in Adult Subjects Aged 18 to 70 years with Hematologic Malignancies. A maximum of 70 total eligible subjects will be enrolled and treated in the trial at approximately 15-20 centers in the US and EU.

    at UCSD

  • Transplantation of Ex Vivo Expanded, UCB-derived, Stem & Progenitor Cells vs. Unmanipulated UCB for HM Patients

    open to eligible people ages 12-65

    This study is an open-label, controlled, multicenter, international, Phase III, randomized study of transplantation of NiCord® versus transplantation of one or two unmanipulated, unrelated cord blood units in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic myeloid leukemia or lymphoma, all with required disease features rendering them eligible for allogeneic transplantation.

    at UCLA

  • Vincristine Sulfate Liposome Injection (Marqibo®) in Combination With UK ALL R3 Induction Chemotherapy for Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults With Relapsed ALL

    open to eligible people ages 1-21

    This is a pilot study utilizing Marqibo® (vincristine sulfate liposome injection) combined with dexamethasone, mitoxantrone and asparaginase (UK ALL R3) for relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).

    at UCSF

  • A Study of the Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Venetoclax in Pediatric and Young Adult Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Malignancies

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    An open-label, global, multi-center study to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics of venetoclax monotherapy, to determine the dose limiting toxicity (DLT) and the recommended Phase 2 dose (RPTD), and to assess the preliminary efficacy of venetoclax in pediatric and young adult participants with relapsed or refractory malignancies.

    at UCSF

  • A Study to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Daratumumab in Pediatric and Young Adult Participants Greater Than or Equal to (>=)1 and Less Than or Equal to (<=) 30 Years of Age With Relapsed/Refractory Precursor B-cell or T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of daratumumab in addition to standard chemotherapy in relapsed/refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)/lymphoblastic lymphoma (LL) and T-cell ALL/LL as measured by the complete response (CR) rate.

    at UCSF

  • Assessing Compliance With Mercaptopurine Treatment in Younger Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in First Remission

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase III trial studies compliance to a mercaptopurine treatment intervention compared to standard of care in younger patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has had a decrease in or disappearance of signs and symptoms of cancer (remission). Assessing ways to help patients who have acute lymphoblastic leukemia to take their medications as prescribed may help them in taking their medications more consistently and may improve treatment outcomes.

    at UCLA

  • Blood Sample Markers of Reproductive Hormones in Assessing Ovarian Reserve in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Lymphomas

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This clinical trial studies blood sample markers of reproductive hormones in assessing ovarian reserve in younger patients with newly diagnosed lymphomas. Studying samples of blood from patients with cancer in the laboratory may help measure the effect of curative therapy for lymphoma on ovarian failure.

    at UCSF

  • Chemotherapy With Liposomal Cytarabine CNS Prophylaxis for Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia & Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The objective of this protocol is to improve survival for adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or acute lymphoblastic lymphoma by reducing systemic and central nervous system (CNS) relapse with acceptable toxicity using intensive chemotherapy with liposomal cytarabine (Depocyt®) CNS prophylaxis.

    at UCSF UCSD UCLA UC Davis

  • Chlorhexidine Gluconate Cleansing in Preventing Central Line Associated Bloodstream Infection and Acquisition of Multi-drug Resistant Organisms in Younger Patients With Cancer or Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase III trial studies chlorhexidine gluconate cleansing to see how well it works compared to control cleansing in preventing central line associated bloodstream infection and acquisition of multi-drug resistant organisms in younger patients with cancer or undergoing donor stem cell transplant. Chlorhexidine gluconate may help reduce bloodstream infections and bacterial infections associated with the central line.

    at UCSF UCLA

  • Collecting and Storing Samples of Bone Marrow and Blood From Patients With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This research study is collecting and storing samples of bone marrow and blood from patients with relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia or relapsed non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Collecting and storing samples of bone marrow and blood from patients with cancer to study in the laboratory may help doctors learn more about cancer and help predict the recurrence of cancer.

    at UCLA UCSF UC Davis

  • Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II trial is studying the side effects of giving combination chemotherapy together with or without donor stem cell transplant and to see how well it works in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more cancer cells. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It also stops the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. The donated stem cells may replace the patient's immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells (graft-versus-tumor effect).

    at UC Davis

  • Combination chemotherapy with/without targeted therapy to treat younger patients with newly diagnosed leukemia and lymphoma

    “Does adding targeted chemotherapy improve effectiveness of standard combination chemotherapy in treating younger patients?”

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    This randomized phase III trial compares how well combination chemotherapy works when given with or without bortezomib in treating patients with newly diagnosed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia or stage II-IV T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma. Bortezomib may help reduce the number of leukemia or lymphoma cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It may also help chemotherapy work better by making cancer cells more sensitive to the drugs. It is not yet known if giving standard chemotherapy with or without bortezomib is more effective in treating T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma.

    at UCSF UC Davis UCLA

  • Cytogenetic Studies in Acute Leukemia and Multiple Myeloma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Chromosomal analysis or the study of genetic differences in patients previously untreated with AML, ALL, MDS or MM may be helpful in the diagnosis and classification of disease. It may also improve the ability to predict the course of disease and the selection of therapy. Institutions must have either an Alliance-approved cytogeneticist or an agreement from an Alliance-approved main member cytogenetics laboratory to enroll a patient on CALGB 8461. The Alliance Approved Institutional Cytogeneticists list is posted on the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology website.

    at UCSF UCSD

  • Diagnostic Study of Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This research trial studies molecular genetic features in blood and tissue samples from patients with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia or acute promyelocytic leukemia. Studying samples of blood and tissue from patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or acute promyelocytic leukemia in the laboratory may help doctors identify and learn more about biomarkers related to cancer.

    at UCSF

  • Double Cord Versus Haploidentical (BMT CTN 1101)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Hematopoietic cell transplants (HCT)are one treatment option for people with leukemia or lymphoma. Family members,unrelated donors or banked umbilical cordblood units with similar tissue type can be used for HCT. This study will compare the effectiveness of two new types of bone marrow transplants in people with leukemia or lymphoma: one that uses bone marrow donated from family members with only partially matched bone marrow; and, one that uses two partially matched cord blood units.

    at UCLA

  • Everolimus With Multiagent Re-Induction Chemotherapy in Pediatric Patients With ALL

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Laboratory and other studies suggest that, the study drug, Everolimus (RAD001), may prevent tumor cell growth and also may increase the efficacy of other chemotherapy drugs. Everolimus is approved for use in the United States for certain types of cancer, such as kidney cancer. It has been extensively studied in people with various types of cancer as a single agent (a drug that is used alone to treat the cancer) or in combination with a number of other drugs. Studies in adults with cancer have also evaluated Everolimus in combination with other anti-tumor drugs. Information from lab studies and some other clinical trials suggests that Everolimus may kill leukemia cells on its own, and also make it more likely that steroids (such as prednisone) are able to kill leukemia cells. In this research study, we are looking to learn more about how Everolimus works in combination with other drugs which are commonly used to treat relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (prednisone, vincristine, PEG-asparaginase, and doxorubicin). The main goal of the study is to evaluate the side effects of this treatment combination in order to determine a safe dose of Everolimus which can be given with these other 4 drugs.

    at UCSF

  • Expanded Access Program of Ponatinib

    Sorry, not accepting new patients

    This protocol will allow expanded access of ponatinib to patients ≥18 years with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) any phase or Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph+ALL) who have failed all available treatment options.

    at UCSD

  • Expanded Access Protocol (EAP) Using the CliniMACS® Device for Pediatric Haplocompatible Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    Sorry, not accepting new patients

    This protocol provides expanded access to bone marrow transplants for children who lack a histocompatible (tissue matched) stem cell or bone marrow donor when an alternative donor (unrelated donor or half-matched related donor) is available to donate. In this procedure, some of the blood forming cells (the stem cells) are collected from the blood of a partially human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matched (haploidentical) donor and are transplanted into the patient (the recipient) after administration of a "conditioning regimen". A conditioning regimen consists of chemotherapy and sometimes radiation to the entire body (total body irradiation, or TBI), which is meant to destroy the cancer cells and suppress the recipient's immune system to allow the transplanted cells to take (grow). A major problem after a transplant from an alternative donor is increased risk of Graft-versus-Host Disease (GVHD), which occurs when donor T cells (white blood cells that are involved with the body's immune response) attack other tissues or organs like the skin, liver and intestines of the transplant recipient. In this study, stem cells that are obtained from a partially-matched donor will be highly purified using the investigational CliniMACS® stem cell selection device in an effort to achieve specific T cell target values. The primary aim of the study is to help improve overall survival with haploidentical stem cell transplant in a high risk patient population by limiting the complication of GVHD.

    at UCSF

  • Experimental drug and combination chemotherapy to treat infants with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and KMT2A gene rearrangement

    “Does the addition of azacitidine increase the ability of chemotherapy to kill leukemia cells?”

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    This pilot phase II trial studies the side effects of azacitidine and combination chemotherapy in infants with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and KMT2A gene rearrangement. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as methotrexate, prednisolone, daunorubicin hydrochloride, cytarabine, dexamethasone, vincristine sulfate, pegaspargase, hydrocortisone sodium succinate, azacitidine, cyclophosphamide, mercaptopurine, leucovorin calcium, and thioguanine work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug may kill more cancer cells.

    at UCSF UC Davis UCLA

  • Ipilimumab or Nivolumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed Hematologic Malignancies After Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I/Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of ipilimumab or nivolumab in treating patients with cancers of the blood and blood-forming tissues (hematologic cancers) that have returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) after donor stem cell transplant. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab and nivolumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread.

    at UCSD

  • KIR Favorable Mismatched Haplo Transplant and KIR Polymorphism in ALL/AML/MDS Allo-HCT Children

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    This is a phase II, open-label, non-randomized, prospective study of haploidentical transplantation using KIR-favorable donors for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). The relationship of KIR2DL1 polymorphisms to survival in children with these diseases undergoing any approach to allogeneic HCT during the study time frame will also be determined.

    at UCSF

  • Long-Term Follow-up Study for Patients Previously Treated With JCAR015

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study will provide long-term follow-up for patients who have received treatment with JCAR015 in a previous clinical trial. In this study, patients will be followed for up to 15 years after their last dose of JCAR015 for evaluation of delayed adverse events, presence of persisting JCAR015 vector sequences, and survival.

    at UCSF

  • Natural History and Biology of Long-Term Late Effects Following Hematopoietic Cell Transplant for Childhood Hematologic Malignancies

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a prospective non-therapeutic study, assessing the long-term toxicity of pediatric HCT for hematologic malignancies. This study is a collaboration between the Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium (PBMTC), the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR), the National Marrow Transplant Program (NMDP) and the Resource for Clinical Investigation in Blood and Marrow Transplantation (RCI-BMT) of the CIBMTR. The study will enroll pediatric patients who undergo myeloablative HCT for hematologic malignancies at PBMTC sites.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Pediatric Philadelphia Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether Dasatinib when added to standard chemotherapy is effective and safe in the treatment of pediatric philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    at UCSF

  • Phase I Trial of the Selective Inhibitor of Nuclear Export, KPT-330, in Relapsed Childhood ALL and AML

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This research study involves participants who have acute lymphoblastic or acute myelogenous leukemia that has relapsed or has become resistant (or refractory) to standard therapies. This research study is evaluating a drug called KPT-330. Laboratory and other studies suggest that the study drug, KPT-330, may prevent leukemia cells from growing and may lead to the destruction of leukemia cells. It is thought that KPT-330 activates cellular processes that increase the death of leukemia cells. The main goal of this study is to evaluate the side effects of KPT-330 when it is administered to children and adolescents with relapsed or refractory leukemia.

    at UCSF

  • Risk-Adapted Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Standard-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Localized B-Lineage Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This partially randomized phase III trial studies the side effects of different combinations of risk-adapted chemotherapy regimens and how well they work in treating younger patients with newly diagnosed standard-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia or B-lineage lymphoblastic lymphoma that is found only in the tissue or organ where it began (localized). Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy), giving the drugs in different doses, and giving the drugs in different combinations may kill more cancer cells.

    at UCLA UCSF UC Davis

  • Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This research trial studies a risk-based classification system for patients with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Gathering health information about patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia may help doctors learn more about the disease and plan the best treatment.

    at UCLA UCSF UC Davis

  • Safety and Efficacy of Entospletinib With Vincristine and Dexamethasone in Adults With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study will evaluate the safety, efficacy, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of entospletinib (GS-9973) in combination with vincristine (VCR), and dexamethasone in adults with previously treated relapsed or refractory B-cell lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). This is a dose escalation study in which after 2 induction cycles participants may be put on maintenance for up to 36 cycles if they have obtained clinical benefit from the treatment.

    at UCLA UC Irvine UCSD

  • Study to Assess Compliance With Long-Term Mercaptopurine Treatment in Young Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This clinical trial is assessing compliance with long-term mercaptopurine treatment in young patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in remission. Assessing why young patients who have acute lymphoblastic leukemia may not take their medications as prescribed may help identify ways to assist them in taking their medications more consistently and may improve long-term treatment outcomes.

    at UCLA UCSF UC Davis

  • Talazoparib and Temozolomide in Treating Younger Patients With Refractory or Recurrent Malignancies

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I/II trial studies the side effects and best dose of talazoparib and temozolomide and to see how well they work in treating younger patients with tumors that have not responded to previous treatment (refractory) or have come back (recurrent). Talazoparib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving talazoparib together with temozolomide may work better in treating younger patients with refractory or recurrent malignancies.

    at UCSF

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