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Adverse Childhood Experiences clinical trials at University of California Health

2 research studies open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • BLOOM: Boldly Living outdOOrs for Mental Health

    open to eligible people ages 9-12

    In 2019, the Office of the California Surgeon General launched the ACEs Aware Initiative in collaboration with the California Department of Health Care Services. This ambitious campaign aims to develop a network of care model of healthcare delivery that explicitly links health resources within communities to clinicians screening patients for ACEs. The ACEs Aware Initiative recognizes nature experiences as one of seven "stress busters." Indeed, California boasts many outdoor resources for clinicians to integrate into the network of care. Through a calming effect on the autonomic nervous system, providing a setting for supportive relationships to develop and physical activity to occur, time in nature may help California prevent, heal and treat ACEs and the clinical sequelae. As one of the most common psychiatric disorders in youth, anxiety remains one of the most important sequelae of ACEs. There is a gap in evidence evaluating nature-based programs for child mental health. This study will evaluate BLOOM [Boldly Living outdOOrs for Mental health], a new intervention which is a modified version of an existing nature-based curriculum called SHINE (Stay Healthy In Nature Everyday) curriculum currently in place at UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland, which takes youth and their families into nature once a month for stress relief. This new intervention mirrors SHINE except that it will be tailored to children ages 9-12 with a history of ACEs and current anxiety. This study will evaluate the benefits of a group intervention model, an independent nature-outing model, and a comparison to a wait-listed control group. Our goal is to provide a scalable model for low-cost mental health care to the California Department of Health Care Services.

    at UCSF

  • Testing a Scalable Model For ACEs-Related Care Navigation

    open to eligible people ages up to 11 years

    The study is a randomized controlled trial of a telephone-based care coordination system for families who experienced Adverse Childhood Events (ACEs). The investigators will conduct the study in partnership with Kaiser Permanente School of Medicine (KPSOM) and 2-1-1 Los Angeles County (211LA), part of a national network of 2-1-1 call centers covering 93% of the US population. The study will test the effectiveness of 211LA in increasing referrals and services for families who screen positive for ACEs.

    at UCLA

Our lead scientists for Adverse Childhood Experiences research studies include .

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