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Androgen Deprivation Therapy clinical trials at University of California Health

12 in progress, 4 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Study of Salvage Radiotherapy With or Without Enzalutamide in Recurrent Prostate Cancer Following Surgery

    open to eligible males ages 18 years and up

    Patients with post-prostatectomy PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen) recurrences with aggressive disease features will receive salvage radiation therapy and standard androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) or enhanced ADT to determine if there is any improvement in progression-free survival when enhanced ADT is used compared to standard ADT.

    at UCSF

  • Biomarker Monitoring of Prostate Cancer Patients With RSI MRI (ProsRSI)

    open to eligible males ages 18 years and up

    Adult male patients with high-risk, localized prostate cancer and planning to undergo radiation therapy (RT) with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) will undergo an advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) examination called Restriction Spectrum Imaging (RSI-MRI) to evaluate whether RSI-MRI can predict treatment response.

    at UCSD

  • Leveraging Technology to Achieve Equity for Men With Prostate Cancer on Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    open to eligible males ages 18 years and up

    This clinical trial studies a digital platform, the supportive therapy in androgen deprivation (STAND-T), in achieving equity for men undergoing treatment with androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer. STAND-T is a digital platform that provides prostate health information, evidence-based materials and resources. STAND-T may help improve health, address symptoms, and promote equity in men with prostate cancer.

    at UCSF

  • Nivolumab + Docetaxel + ADT in mHSPC Patients With DDRD or Inflamed Tumors

    open to eligible males ages 18 years and up

    This research study is studying a combination of hormonal therapy, chemotherapy, and immunotherapy as a possible treatment for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. The names of the study drugs involved in this study are: - Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) with a drug of your physician's choice. This may include leuprolide (Lupron), goserelin acetate (Zoladex), or degarelix (Firmagon). - Docetaxel - Nivolumab

    at UCSD

  • A Study to Compare Darolutamide Given With Androgen Deprivation Therapy (ADT) With ADT in Men With Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer and Raise of Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) Levels After Local Therapies

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    Researchers are looking for a better way to treat men at high-risk of biochemical recurrence (BCR) of prostate cancer. BCR means that in men who had prostate cancer and were treated by either surgery and/ or radiation therapy, the blood level of a specific protein called PSA rises. PSA is a marker for prostate cancer development. This may mean that the cancer has come back even though no cancer or cancer spreading is yet detectable using conventional imaging such as computed tomography (CT) scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and bone scans. Recently a more sensitive imaging method called prostate-specific membrane antigen [PSMA] positron emission tomography [PET]) /computed tomography [CT]) scan may identify prostate cancer lesions not detectable by conventional imaging. Men with BCR have a higher risk of their cancer spreading to other parts of the body, particularly men with a stage of prostate cancer where the PSA levels raised to a certain limit within a specified period of time after local therapies. Once the cancer spreads to other parts of the body, it can become even harder to treat. In men with prostate cancer, male sex hormones (also called androgens) like testosterone can help the cancer grow and spread. To reduce androgens levels in these patients, there are treatments that block androgens production in the body called androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). ADT is often used to stop prostate cancer. Another way to stop prostate cancer growth and spread is to block the action of androgen receptors on prostate cancer cells. Next generation androgen receptor inhibitors (ARIs) including darolutamide can block the action of androgens receptors and are available for the treatment of prostate cancer in addition to ADT. It is already known that men with prostate cancer benefit from these treatments. The main objective of this study is to learn if the combination of darolutamide and ADT prolongs the time that the participants live without their cancer getting worse, or to death due to any cause, compared to placebo and ADT given for 24 months. A placebo is a treatment that looks like a medicine but does not have any medicine in it. To do this, the study team will measure the time from the date of treatment allocation to the finding of new cancer spread in the participants by using PSMA PET/CT, or death due to any cause. The PSMA PET/CT scans is performed using a radioactive substance called a "tracer" that specifically binds to the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) which is a protein often found in large amounts on prostate cancer cells. To avoid bias in treatment, the study participants will be randomly (by chance) allocated to one of two treatment groups. Based on the allocated treatment group, the participants will either take darolutamide plus ADT or placebo plus ADT twice daily as tablets by mouth. The study will consist of a test (screening) phase, a treatment phase and a follow-up phase. The treatment duration will be 24 months unless the cancer gets worse, the participants have medical problems, or they leave the study for any reason. In addition, image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) or surgery is allowed and your doctor will explain the benefits and risks of this type of therapy. During the study, the study team will: - take blood and urine samples. - measure PSA and testosterone levels in the blood samples - do physical examinations - check the participants' overall health - examine heart health using electrocardiogram (ECG) - check vital signs - check cancer status using PSMA PET/CT scans, CT, MRI and bone scans - take tumor samples (if required) - ask the participants if they have medical problems About 30 days after the participants have taken their last treatment, the study doctors and their team will check the participants' health and if their cancer worsened. The study team will continue to check this and regularly ask the participants questions about medical problems and subsequent therapies until they leave the study for any reason or until they leave the study for any reason or until the end of the study, whatever comes first.

    at UC Irvine UCLA UCSF

  • Androgen-Deprivation Therapy and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Prostate Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    RATIONALE: Androgens can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. Androgen deprivation therapy may stop the adrenal glands from making androgens. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. PURPOSE: This randomized phase III trial studies androgen-deprivation therapy and radiation therapy in treating patients with prostate cancer.

    at UC Davis UCSD UCSF

  • Efficacy and Safety of Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) Plus Enzalutamide Plus Androgen Deprivation Therapy (ADT) Versus Placebo Plus Enzalutamide Plus ADT in Participants With Metastatic Hormone-Sensitive Prostate Cancer (mHSPC) (MK-3475-991/KEYNOTE-991)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study will assess the efficacy and safety of pembrolizumab plus enzalutamide plus ADT versus placebo plus enzalutamide plus ADT in participants with mHSPC. The primary hypothesis is that in participants with mHSPC, the combination of pembrolizumab plus enzalutamide plus ADT is superior to placebo plus enzalutamide plus ADT with respect to 1) radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) per Prostate Cancer Working Group (PCWG)-modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1 as assessed by blinded independent central review (BICR) and 2) overall survival (OS).

    at UCLA

  • Hormone Therapy, Radiation Therapy, and Steroid 17alpha-monooxygenase TAK-700 in Treating Patients With High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    RATIONALE: Androgens can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. Drugs, such as steroid 17alpha-monooxygenase TAK-700, when used with other hormone therapy, may lessen the amount of androgens made by the body. Radiation therapy uses high energy x rays to kill tumor cells. This may be an effective treatment for prostate cancer when combined with hormone therapy. Studying quality-of-life in patients having cancer treatment may help identify the intermediate- and long-term effects of treatment on patients with prostate cancer. PURPOSE: This randomized phase III trial is studying the use of hormone therapy, including TAK-700, together with radiation therapy in treating patients with prostate cancer.

    at UCSD UCSF

  • Pembrolizumab +/- SD-101 in Hormone-Naïve Oligometastatic Prostate Cancer With RT and iADT

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a non-comparative open-label multicenter Phase 2 clinical trial combining stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and pembrolizumab with or without intratumoral SD-101 in patients with newly diagnosed hormone-naive oligometastatic prostate cancer.

    at UCSF

  • S1014 Abiraterone Acetate in Treating Patients With Prostate Cancer Who Have Undergone Initial Hormone Therapy

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    RATIONALE: Androgens can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. Antiandrogen drugs, such as abiraterone acetate, may lessen the amount of androgens made by the body. It may also stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. PURPOSE: This phase II trial is studying the side effects and how well abiraterone acetate works in treating patients with prostate cancer who have undergone initial hormone therapy.

    at UC Davis

  • S1216, Phase III ADT+TAK-700 vs. ADT+Bicalutamide for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to compare overall survival in newly diagnosed metastatic prostate cancer patients randomly assigned to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) + TAK-700 versus ADT + bicalutamide.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCSD UCSF

  • Predicting Cognitive Decline From Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Androgen Deprivation Therapy (ADT) is associated with cognitive impairment and dementia in men with prostate cancer. Pre-clinical data suggest that ADT-induced hypogonadism leads to accumulation of beta-amyloid plaques in the hippocampus, a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Neuroimaging Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies also demonstrate that ADT decreases metabolic activity in the parietal, occipital, and prefrontal cortices. Multiple prospective cohort and population-based clinical studies have been conducted to test the association between ADT and cognitive impairment and/or dementia. Plasma biomarkers have been developed to predict brain amyloidosis, a key pathological feature of AD and a risk factor for developing dementia due to AD. The advantage of a blood-based assay is the lower cost, invasiveness, and time compared to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET)-based biomarkers.

    at UCSF

Our lead scientists for Androgen Deprivation Therapy research studies include .

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