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Anesthesia clinical trials at University of California Health

10 in progress, 4 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Anesthesia-Centered Bundle to Reduce Postoperative Pulmonary Complications: The PRIME-AIR Study

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in surgical patients. National estimates suggest 1,062,000 PPCs per year, with 46,200 deaths, and 4.8 million additional days of hospitalization. The objective of the study is to develop and implement perioperative strategies to eliminate PPCs in abdominal surgery, the field with the largest absolute number of PPCs. We will conduct a randomized controlled pragmatic trial in 750 studied participants. The effectiveness of an individualized perioperative anesthesia-centered bundle will be compared to the usual anesthetic care in patients receiving open abdominal surgery. At the end of this project, the investigators expect to change clinical practice by establishing a new and clinically feasible anesthesia-centered strategy to reduce perioperative lung morbidity. The research will be conducted across 14 US academic centers, and will be funded by the National Institute of Health.

    at UCSF

  • Erector Spinae Plane Block Catheters and Intrathecal Morphine for Hepatic Resection

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    To determine whether the addition of erector spinae plane (ESP) catheters to existing multimodal analgesic regimen with intrathecal morphine provides superior postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing hepatic resection compared with patients not receiving ESP catheters.

    at UCSD

  • Pupillometry as Guide for Extubation Readiness in Anesthetized Children

    open to eligible people ages 2-10

    Investigation of pupillometry as guide for extubation readiness in anesthetized children.

    at UCSF

  • Pain Injection Versus Epidural Anesthesia for Hip Surgery in Pediatric Patients With Cerebral Palsy

    open to eligible people ages up to 18 years

    Pain management in pediatric patients presents a difficult challenge. Unlike adults, pediatric patients often cannot communicate their pain management needs clearly. This is especially true in patients with cerebral palsy (CP), who often have concomitant developmental delay, intellectual disability and verbal limitations. Current literature indicates pain as a common experience for children with CP but has been understudied in this population. Moreover, inadequate post-operative pain control can result in negative physiologic and psychological complications and lead to poor surgical outcomes. Currently, perioperative pain management following orthopaedic procedures in pediatric patients follows traditional protocols that rely on the administration of opioid medications despite their known adverse side effects including nausea, vomiting, itching, constipation, urinary retention, confusion, and respiratory depression. Epidural anesthesia is a key modality in traditional pain management for pediatric patients with CP given its proven efficacy in decreasing pain and managing spasticity. Yet, administering epidural anesthesia in this patient population poses several risks including damage to preexisting intrathecal baclofen pumps, iatrogenic infection, and technically demanding insertion given high rates of concomitant neuromuscular scoliosis. Alternatively, multimodal analgesic injections theoretically offer an efficacious adjunct to traditional pain management protocols with a lower risk profile. Preliminary data from our study group's pilot randomized control trial comparing the safety and efficacy of a multimodal surgical site injection to placebo showed decreased pain scores and narcotic consumption postoperatively in this patient population. Based on these promising results, the objective of this randomized control trial is to evaluate the efficacy of a multimodal surgical site injection compared to epidural anesthesia for postoperative pain control following operative management of hip dysplasia in pediatric patients with CP.

    at UCLA

  • Danavorexton in People With Obstructive Sleep Apnea After General Anesthesia for Abdominal Surgery

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The main aim is to see if danavorexton can help improve people's breathing in the recovery room after abdominal surgery.

    at UCSD

  • THRIVE Use in Pediatric Populations- Multi Site

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    THRIVE (Transnasal Humidified Rapid-Insufflation Ventilatory Exchange) refers to the use of high-flow nasal cannula to augment the ability to oxygenate and ventilate a patient under general anesthesia. The use of high-flow nasal cannula oxygen supplementation during anesthesia for surgical procedures has been a recent development in the adult population, with limited data analyzing the pediatric population. This study will determine whether high flow nasal cannula oxygen supplementation during surgical or endoscopic procedures can prevent desaturation events in children under anesthesia and improve the outcomes of that surgery.

    at UC Davis

  • Can Single-Injection Adductor Canal Blocks Improve PostOp Pain Relief in Patients Undergoing Total Knee Arthroplasty?

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of the study is to determine the effect of a single injection adductor canal block (ACB) on pain scores within 24 hours post total knee arthroplasty (TKA).

    at UC Irvine

  • Fasting on Patient Outcomes After Wide-Awake, Local Anesthesia-only, No Tourniquet (WALANT) Procedures

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether eating solid food prior to undergoing a wide awake local-only no tourniquet (WALANT) procedure reduces anxiety in patients or has any effect on outcomes. Patients will be split randomly into two groups and told whether to eat or fast before their procedure. We will then compare levels of anxiety and nausea on the day of the procedure as well as satisfaction with the procedure and other outcome measures at follow-up visits. Our hypothesis is that patients who are instructed to eat before their WALANT procedure will have less anxiety, nausea, and overall higher satisfaction compared to those who are instructed to fast prior to their procedure.

    at UC Irvine

  • Treatment of Pre-induction Hypertension on Hemodynamic Stability During Induction of General Anesthesia

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The purpose of this study is to determine if treatment of pre-induction hypertension with an intravenous short acting calcium channel antagonist will (1) reduce the magnitude and duration of blood pressure excursions outside of a pre-established normal range and (2) decrease the requirement for vasoactive medications during the period from induction of anesthesia until just prior to surgical incision.

    at UCSD

  • Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology Research Network General Anesthesia Registry

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The SOAP registry is a prospective, multicenter, electronic registry. The goal is to investigate the indications, mode of airway management, predisposing factors, and obstetric and anesthetic outcomes of pregnant patients who receive general anesthesia for cesarean delivery.

    at UCSF

Our lead scientists for Anesthesia research studies include .

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