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Anesthesia clinical trials at UC Health
7 in progress, 5 open to eligible people

  • Anesthetics and Analgesics in Children

    open to eligible people ages 2-17

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the pharmacokinetic (PK) and safety profile of anesthetics and analgesics in children and adolescents.

    at UCSF

  • Comparison of Depth of Sedation Performance Between SedLine and Comparator Device During General Anesthesia

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The primary objective is to compare the performance of Masimo's SedLine and the comparator's device systems during surgery. Relative accuracy of the individual depth of sedation indices will be compared.

    at UC Davis

  • Does Single Injection Adductor Canal Block Improve Postoperative Analgesia in Patients Receiving Periarticular Local Anesthesia Injections for Total Knee Arthroplasty?

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of the study is to determine the effect of a single injection adductor canal block (ACB) on pain scores within 24 hours post total knee arthroplasty (TKA).

    at UC Irvine

  • Esophageal Manometry During Recovery From Anesthesia: Pilot Study

    open to eligible people ages 18-70

    1. An intact pharyngoesophageal reflex is essential to protect the upper airway from aspiration of either mouth contents or regurgitated gastric refluxate. This reflex is essential at protecting the airway in all patients. 2. In patients, while under general anesthesia, it is postulated that an identifiable upper esophageal sphincter and esophageal peristalsis are not present. 3. With the cessation of general anesthetics, accompanied by the reversal of nerve block, normal pharyngoesophageal peristaltic activity correlates with awakening the patient from anesthesia. This would be identified by the performance of esophageal manometry. 4. A return of normal verbally stimulated pharyngoesophageal swallowing sequence accurately identifies a safe time to remove endotracheal tubes and/or reverse anesthesia. This verbally stimulated swallowing sequence correlated precisely with the return of objective pharyngoesophageal function.

    at UCSF

  • Regional Versus General Anesthesia for Promoting Independence After Hip Fracture

    “Which anesthesia is better for hip fracture surgery patients, regional block anesthesia or general anesthesia?”

    open to eligible people ages 50 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to find out if two types of standard care anesthesia are the same or if one is better for people who have hip fractures.

    at UC Davis

  • Addition of Buprenorphine to Paracervical Block for Pain Control During Osmotic Dilator Insertion

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Cervical preparation with osmotic dilators is commonly used prior to dilation and evacuation (D&E) procedures to decrease the risk of complications. Women have described the pain of osmotic dilator insertion as moderate to severe yet there have been few studies aimed at addressing pain during and after osmotic dilator insertion. In addition to the discomfort during insertion, pain after osmotic dilator insertion peaks at 2 hours post-insertion with use of a lidocaine paracervical block. One randomized trial found that use of a paracervical block with 1% buffered lidocaine decreased pain with osmotic dilator insertion compared to a sham block. There are adjunct treatments to optimize analgesia with local anesthetics at a variety of anatomic locations. Buprenorphine, a partial mu-opioid receptor agonist, has been found to increase the quality of the anesthetic at the time of administration and increase the duration of nerve block analgesia at several anatomic sites, though has never been studied as an adjunct in a paracervical block. This has been used extensively in orthopedic surgery with significant prolongation of the local anesthetic effect by almost threefold in some studies. Primary Aim: To compare the mean pain score at the time of osmotic dilator insertion among women randomized to a 1% lidocaine and buprenorphine paracervical block compared to a 1% lidocaine paracervical block alone. Secondary Aim: To compare the mean pain score 2 hours after osmotic dilator insertion among women randomized to a lidocaine and buprenorphine paracervical block compared to a lidocaine paracervical block alone. The investigators hypothesize that in patients undergoing osmotic dilator insertion in preparation for dilation and evacuation, the addition of buprenorphine 0.15mg to a 1% lidocaine paracervical block will be associated with lower mean pain scores at time of osmotic dilator insertion compared to women who receive a 1% lidocaine paracervical block alone.

    at UCSD

  • Cognitive Effects of Anesthesia on Children

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Anesthesia for more than 120 minutes given to children less than 2 years of age without coexisting diseases of the central nervous system or the heart cause long-term impairment of recognition memory.

    at UC Davis UCSF

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