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Anesthesia clinical trials at University of California Health

16 in progress, 9 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • An Anesthesia-Centered Bundle to Reduce Postoperative Pulmonary Complications: The PRIME-AIR Study

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in surgical patients. National estimates suggest 1,062,000 PPCs per year, with 46,200 deaths, and 4.8 million additional days of hospitalization. The objective of the study is to develop and implement perioperative strategies to eliminate PPCs in abdominal surgery, the field with the largest absolute number of PPCs. We will conduct a randomized controlled pragmatic trial in 750 studied participants. The effectiveness of an individualized perioperative anesthesia-centered bundle will be compared to the usual anesthetic care in patients receiving open abdominal surgery. At the end of this project, the investigators expect to change clinical practice by establishing a new and clinically feasible anesthesia-centered strategy to reduce perioperative lung morbidity. The research will be conducted across 14 US academic centers, and will be funded by the National Institute of Health.

    at UCSF

  • Continuous Erector Spinae Plane Blocks for Rib Fractures

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Rib fractures are one of the most common injuries in trauma patients. These fractures are associated with significant pain as well as decreased ability to inspire deeply or cough to clear secretions, which together lead to complications of the lungs and breathing which leads to risks of further injury and even death. One recent study found that the ability to move air into and out of the lungs practically doubled with the administration of a single-injection Erector Spainae Plane Block (ESPB) while pain levels nearly halved. However, a single-injection nerve block lasts less than 24 hours while a perineural local anesthetic infusion (also termed a "continuous peripheral nerve block") may be administered for multiple days. This entails inserting a tiny tube through the skin and into the area around the nerves, after which more local anesthetic may be administered prolonging the numbing effects. The possibility of extending the duration of a ESPB with local anesthetic administration via a perineural catheter has not be investigated. We therefore are conducting a randomized, triple-masked, placebo-controlled, parallel-arm study to investigate the addition of a continuous ESPB to a single-injection ESPB following traumatic rib fractures. The primary outcome of this study will be the maximum inspired volume measured by incentive spirometry on the afternoon following the nerve block procedure. We hypothesize that the maximum inspired volume will be significantly increased in the afternoon following the procedure with the addition of a continuous ESPB to a single-injection ESPB.

    at UCSD

  • Does Single Injection Adductor Canal Block Improve Postoperative Analgesia in Patients Receiving Periarticular Local Anesthesia Injections for Total Knee Arthroplasty?

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of the study is to determine the effect of a single injection adductor canal block (ACB) on pain scores within 24 hours post total knee arthroplasty (TKA).

    at UC Irvine

  • Erector Spinae Plane Block Catheters and Intrathecal Morphine for Hepatic Resection

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    To determine whether the addition of erector spinae plane (ESP) catheters to existing multimodal analgesic regimen with intrathecal morphine provides superior postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing hepatic resection compared with patients not receiving ESP catheters.

    at UCSD

  • Esophageal Manometry During Recovery From Anesthesia: Pilot Study

    open to eligible people ages 18-70

    1. An intact pharyngoesophageal reflex is essential to protect the upper airway from aspiration of either mouth contents or regurgitated gastric refluxate. This reflex is essential at protecting the airway in all patients. 2. In patients, while under general anesthesia, it is postulated that an identifiable upper esophageal sphincter and esophageal peristalsis are not present. 3. With the cessation of general anesthetics, accompanied by the reversal of nerve block, normal pharyngoesophageal peristaltic activity correlates with awakening the patient from anesthesia. This would be identified by the performance of esophageal manometry. 4. A return of normal verbally stimulated pharyngoesophageal swallowing sequence accurately identifies a safe time to remove endotracheal tubes and/or reverse anesthesia. This verbally stimulated swallowing sequence correlated precisely with the return of objective pharyngoesophageal function.

    at UCSF

  • Evaluation of BIS™ and Levels of Sedation With Common Inhalational Anesthetics in Healthy Volunteers (OLIVER)

    open to eligible people ages 18-60

    To investigate the relationship between BIS™ and inhaled anesthetics across a wide range of anesthetic concentration and hypnotic states, and to provide evidence to support BIS™ performance in use with Isoflurane, Sevoflurane and Desflurane in combination with opioids.

    at UCSF

  • iPACK Block With Dexamethasone For Total Knee Replacement

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Comparing the pain control outcomes for patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with either: 1) adductor canal single shot injection plus placebo iPACK injection or 2) adductor canal single shot injection plus bupivacaine and dexamethasone iPACK injection. There are two surgical approaches for TKA 1) open 2) ROSA robotic assisted. Both follow the same pain management pathway. We plan to enroll patient undergoing either surgical procedure.

    at UCSD

  • No Post Intubation Laryngeal Symptoms

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of the study is to test a novel endotracheal tube support device that reduces pressure of the tube on the voice box for prevention of post intubation laryngeal symptoms including sore throat, change in voice and trouble swallowing.

    at UCSD

  • Optimizing Post-operative Recovery in Bariatric Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea Undergoing Outpatient Surgery: A Comparison of Sugammadex and Neostigmine

    open to eligible people ages 18-80

    This study assesses the efficacy of sugammadex against neostigmine for hastening recovery from neuromuscular blockade and optimizing pulmonary function in obese patients with obstructive sleep apnea presenting for outpatient surgery. Both drugs are used in anesthesiology to reverse neuromuscular blockade that is given in the setting of inducing and maintaining general anesthesia.

    at UCSD

  • A Study of Transnasal Humidified Rapid-Insufflation Ventilatory Exchange (THRIVE) in Kids

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    THRIVE (Transnasal Humidified Rapid-Insufflation Ventilatory Exchange) refers to the use of high-flow nasal cannula to augment the ability to oxygenate and ventilate a patient under general anesthesia. The use of high-flow nasal cannula oxygen supplementation during anesthesia for surgical procedures has been a recent development in the adult population, with limited data analyzing the pediatric population. This study will determine whether high flow nasal cannula oxygen supplementation during surgical or endoscopic procedures can prevent desaturation events in children under anesthesia and improve the outcomes of that surgery.

    at UC Davis

  • Bacteriostatic Saline as a Local Anesthetic in Minor Eyelid Procedures

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The investigators aim to assess whether bacteriostatic saline provides the same level of anesthesia as traditional local anesthesia while reducing pain associated with medication infusion in minor eyelid procedures

    at UCSF

  • Effectiveness of iPACK on Postoperative Pain From Hamstring Autograft Following ACL Repair

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Patients undergoing ACL repair with hamstring autograft frequently develop significant post operative pain at the hamstring grafting site. This pain is within the distribution of a commonly used regional nerve block, the Interspace between the popliteal artery and capsule of the knee (iPACK). The investigators plan to randomize consenting patients to either receiving a SHAM injection of normal saline or to an interventional group of long acting local anesthetic (Ropivacaine) injected in the popliteal fossa between the popliteal artery and capsule of the knee (iPACK). Both groups of patients will receive standard of care with respect to perioperative pain management, which includes a preoperative adductor canal nerve block and preoperative acetaminophen administration. Dual primary endpoints of postoperative pain scores and mean postoperative opioid use will be retrieved and compared between groups. Additional secondary endpoints will be PACU length of stay, PACU opioid use, POD1 opioids use, and POD1 pain scores (best, worst, average).

    at UCSD

  • Investigation of Pupillometry as Guide for Extubation Readiness in Anesthetized Children

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Investigation of pupillometry as guide for extubation readiness in anesthetized children.

    at UCSF

  • Regional Versus General Anesthesia for Promoting Independence After Hip Fracture

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to find out if two types of standard care anesthesia are the same or if one is better for people who have hip fractures.

    at UC Davis

  • Translating Anesthesia Care Throughout

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Patients with limited English proficiency (LEP) are at significant risk of receiving care different from those who are English proficient. Through Translating Anesthetic Care Throughout (TACT), the investigators aim to reduce the disparities experienced by participants with LEP undergoing anesthesia by continuing language translation from the preoperative area into the operating room, where participants will be better able to understand what is happening in an otherwise foreign environment. At this time, some participants receive translation in the preoperative area using an interpreter. No further translation is provided beyond the preoperative area unless there is a provider with language concordance or interpretation skills within the perioperative team. The investigators plan to study how extended translation changes a participant's understanding of and feelings about the perioperative period. Supporting language translation for LEP participants from the preoperative area into their operating room (OR) experience will enable providers to better understand how to care for participants from different cultural and language backgrounds and will help us understand how to better serve our community at large. The investigators hypothesize that participants who receive continual translation will have improved informed consent, have improved trust of their anesthesia providers, and be more satisfied with patient care. In addition, they anticipate that the care team also will benefit by the enhanced communication with the participant.

    at UCSF

  • Anesthetics and Analgesics in Children

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the pharmacokinetic (PK) and safety profile of anesthetics and analgesics in children and adolescents.

    at UCSF

Our lead scientists for Anesthesia research studies include .

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