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CD20 Positive clinical trials at UC Health
3 in progress, 2 open to eligible people

  • Ibrutinib, Rituximab, Etoposide, Prednisone, Vincristine Sulfate, Cyclophosphamide, and Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With HIV-Positive Stage II-IV Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphomas

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial studies the side effect and best dose of ibrutinib in combination with rituximab, etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive stage II-IV diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving ibrutinib and etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride may work better in treating patients with HIV-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphomas.

    at UCLA UCSD UCSF

  • Rituximab and LMP-Specific T-Cells in Treating Pediatric Solid Organ Recipients With EBV-Positive, CD20-Positive Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder

    open to eligible people ages up to 29 years

    This pilot phase II trial studies how well rituximab and latent membrane protein (LMP)-specific T-cells work in treating pediatric solid organ recipients with Epstein-Barr virus-positive, cluster of differentiation (CD)20-positive post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. LMP-specific T-cells are special immune system cells trained to recognize proteins found on post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder tumor cells if they are infected with Epstein-Barr virus. Giving rituximab and LMP-specific T-cells may work better in treating pediatric organ recipients with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder than rituximab alone.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Modified Immune Cells (CD19/CD20 CAR-T Cells) in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory B-Cell Lymphoma or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of CD19/CD20 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cells when given together with chemotherapy, and to see how effective they are in treating patients with non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia that has come back (recurrent) or has not responded to treatment (refractory). In CAR-T cell therapy, a patient's white blood cells (T cells) are changed in the laboratory to produce an engineered receptor that allows the T cell to recognize and respond to CD19 and CD20 proteins. CD19 and CD20 are commonly found on non-Hodgkin?s B-cell lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells. Chemotherapy drugs such as fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide can control cancer cells by killing them, by preventing their growth, or by stopping them from spreading. Combining CD19/CD20 CAR-T cells and chemotherapy may help treat patients with recurrent or refractory B-cell lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    at UCLA

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