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Child Development clinical trials at University of California Health

7 in progress, 3 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Mobile Health Intervention to Reduce Sweet Beverage Consumption in Latino Children

    open to eligible people ages 12 months to 59 months

    Sugar-sweetened beverage consumption is a major contributor to childhood obesity, caries, fatty liver disease, and Type 2 diabetes. Latino children are more likely to consume sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) and to suffer from all of the aforementioned conditions. Reading out loud to children from birth through age 5 is critical for the promotion of language and early literacy skills. Children whose parents read aloud to them are more likely to start school with the skills required for early reading success. This is important as reading proficiency in third grade is the best predictor of high school graduation and career success. Latino children are less likely to be read to than non-Hispanic white children and at higher risk of entering kindergarten without critical early literacy skills. Thus, there is a pressing need for interventions to reduce SSB consumption among Latino children as well as interventions that promote reading out loud. Primary care is an optimal setting for such interventions. However, multiple demands on providers' time make it difficult to rely on in-person interventions. For this reason, it is critical to test intervention designs that do not rely directly on health care providers and that can be delivered remotely if needed. The investigators have developed two m-health interventions for Latino parents, one that promotes optimal beverage consumption patterns and one that promotes reading out loud to children. The purpose of this study is to test the impact of these interventions on child beverage intake patterns and the frequency with which parents read to children.

    at UCSF

  • Clinic-Based Financial Coaching and Family Health and Development

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study will examine the impact of clinic-based financial coaching on parent health-related quality of life and child development measures, as well as family social needs for families with young children receiving pediatric care at a primary care practice in the Los Angeles County safety net.

    at UCLA

  • Testing a Scalable Model For ACEs-Related Care Navigation

    open to eligible people ages up to 11 years

    The study is a randomized controlled trial of a telephone-based care coordination system for families who experienced Adverse Childhood Events (ACEs). The investigators will conduct the study in partnership with Kaiser Permanente School of Medicine (KPSOM) and 2-1-1 Los Angeles County (211LA), part of a national network of 2-1-1 call centers covering 93% of the US population. The study will test the effectiveness of 211LA in increasing referrals and services for families who screen positive for ACEs.

    at UCLA

  • Achieving My Potential: A Randomized, Controlled Trial of a Telephone-Based Developmental Care Coordination System

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The proposed project is a randomized controlled trial of a telephone-based early childhood developmental care coordination system, in partnership with 2-1-1 Los Angeles County (211LA), part of a national network of 2-1-1 call centers covering 93% of the US population. The study will test the effectiveness of 211LA in increasing referrals for developmental evaluation, increasing the numbers of children deemed eligible for services, and increasing the number of children actually receiving interventions.

    at UCLA

  • An Examination of Infants' Microbiome, Nutrition, and Development Study.

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study is examining the relationship between infant nutrition, gut health, and development. The fecal microbiota changes and develops, in large part due to the food that infants eat. These changes are important for many aspects of development. This study is designed to examine how the fecal microbiota changes when exclusively breastfed infants are first introduced to solid food, and how changes of the fecal microbiota are related to other aspects of development.

    at UC Davis

  • Healthcare Providers as Trusted Messengers to Increase Receipt of Tax Credits Among Low-income Families

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The purpose of this study is to pilot test the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of healthcare provider referrals to a tax filing app within parent-child health programs to test whether such referrals can increase receipt of tax credits among low-income parents. The study will use a single-group, pre/post test design with a sample of approximately 100 women who have a child under 6 years of age. Participants will be recruited from parental-child health programs and clinics in Los Angeles and will complete surveys at baseline, immediately after tax filing season, and six months after tax filing season to assess 1) frequency of tax filing after referral (Feasibility), 2) the acceptability of the tax filing app from the perspective of users (Acceptability), and 3) pre/posttest changes to parent and child health, child development, and healthcare utilization measures for users (preliminary efficacy).

    at UCLA

  • El Sendero: Pathways to Health Study

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    This project will continue to follow two birth cohorts of mother-infant Latino dyads through a series of new assessments at age 6y, with an emphasis on examining the the role early nutritional exposures, exposures to environmental toxins, and social determinants of health have on adiposity, eating behaviors, brain structure and function, cognitive outcomes, and chronic disease risk.

    at UCSD

Our lead scientists for Child Development research studies include .

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