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Child Development clinical trials at University of California Health

4 in progress, 1 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Clinic-Based Financial Coaching and Family Health and Development

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study will examine the impact of clinic-based financial coaching on parent health-related quality of life and child development measures, as well as family social needs for families with young children receiving pediatric care at a primary care practice in the Los Angeles County safety net.

    at UCLA

  • A Mobile Health Intervention to Reduce Sweet Beverage Consumption in Latino Children

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Sugar-sweetened beverage consumption is a major contributor to childhood obesity, caries, fatty liver disease, and Type 2 diabetes. Latino children are more likely to consume sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) and to suffer from all of the aforementioned conditions. Reading out loud to children from birth through age 5 is critical for the promotion of language and early literacy skills. Children whose parents read aloud to them are more likely to start school with the skills required for early reading success. This is important as reading proficiency in third grade is the best predictor of high school graduation and career success. Latino children are less likely to be read to than non-Hispanic white children and at higher risk of entering kindergarten without critical early literacy skills. Thus, there is a pressing need for interventions to reduce SSB consumption among Latino children as well as interventions that promote reading out loud. Primary care is an optimal setting for such interventions. However, multiple demands on providers' time make it difficult to rely on in-person interventions. For this reason, it is critical to test intervention designs that do not rely directly on health care providers and that can be delivered remotely if needed. The investigators have developed two m-health interventions for Latino parents, one that promotes optimal beverage consumption patterns and one that promotes reading out loud to children. The purpose of this study is to test the impact of these interventions on child beverage intake patterns and the frequency with which parents read to children.

    at UCSF

  • Achieving My Potential: A Randomized, Controlled Trial of a Telephone-Based Developmental Care Coordination System

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    The proposed project is a randomized controlled trial of a telephone-based early childhood developmental care coordination system, in partnership with 2-1-1 Los Angeles County (211LA), part of a national network of 2-1-1 call centers covering 93% of the US population. The study will test the effectiveness of 211LA in increasing referrals for developmental evaluation, increasing the numbers of children deemed eligible for services, and increasing the number of children actually receiving interventions.

    at UCLA

  • An Examination of Infants' Microbiome, Nutrition, and Development Study.

    “Help us learn about the relationship between infant nutrition, gut health, and development!”

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study is examining the relationship between infant nutrition, gut health, and development. The fecal microbiota changes and develops, in large part due to the food that infants eat. These changes are important for many aspects of development. This study is designed to examine how the fecal microbiota changes when exclusively breastfed infants are first introduced to solid food, and how changes of the fecal microbiota are related to other aspects of development.

    at UC Davis

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