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Chronic Prostatitis clinical trials at University of California Health

2 in progress, 0 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • EPPIC: Easing Pelvic Pain Interventions Clinical Research Program

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The EPPIC (Easing Pelvic Pain Interventions Clinical Research Program) study evaluates an ultra-brief, 4 session cognitive behavioral pain treatment transdiagnostic in design for urologic chronic pain syndrome (UCPPS) with clinical and practical advantages over existing behavioral therapies whose length and focus limits their adoption by clinicians and coverage for mechanistically similar comorbidities. A theoretically informed, practical, empirically grounded approach will systematically unpack CBT's working mechanisms, clarify for whom it works, ease dissemination, appeal to patients, providers, payers, and policy makers in the COVID-19 era favoring low resource intensity treatments, and reduce cost and inefficiencies associated with high intensity therapies whose complexity, length, and scarcity restricts uptake and impact.

    at UCLA

  • Trans-MAPP II Study of Urologic Chronic Pelvin Pain

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain (MAPP) Research Network has been established by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to focus on a broader approach to the study of Interstitial Cystitis (IC)/ Bladder Pain Syndrome (BPS) in men and women, and Chronic Prostatitis (CP)/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CPPS) in men, than previously undertaken. Patients with IC or CP are being recruited for a new study called the "Trans-MAPP Study of Urologic Chronic Pelvic Pain: Symptom Patterns Study (SPS). This research study will recruit Control Participants to better understand the symptoms of individuals with some form of IC or CP. As with many chronic pain disorders, IC and CP are poorly understood, and treatment is often not helpful. The goal of this study is to better understand how pain is felt in people with IC or CP and the investigators hope that this study will lead to improvement in the treatment of IC and CP.

    at UCLA

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