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Cognition clinical trials at UC Health

4 in progress, 2 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Brain Health in Breast Cancer Survivors

    open to eligible females ages 35-65

    Endocrine therapy (ET) is widely used to treat hormone receptor positive breast cancer and prevent recurrence by downregulating estrogen function. However, ETs readily cross the blood brain barrier and interfere with the action of estrogen in the brain. Estrogen supports cognition and menopausal status is closely linked to cognitive health in women. This has raised concern that anti-estrogen ETs may affect cognition and brain health in breast cancer survivors. However, evidence across existing studies is inconsistent and these effects remain poorly understood. The incomplete understanding of the effects of ET are likely due to limitations of earlier studies - namely, the under-appreciation of the role of menopausal status and insensitivity of standard cognitive measures. This research project will address these earlier limitations by specifically comparing ET effects by menopausal status, and using highly sensitive, task-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measures to assess the effects of ET on brain function.

    at UCLA

  • Sensory Enrichment for Older Adults

    open to eligible people ages 60-85

    This study evaluates the efficacy of multi-odorant enrichment on cognitive skills, olfactory function, and quality of life.

    at UC Irvine

  • Dopamine D2/D3 Receptor Upregulation by Varenicline in Methamphetamine Users

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    While deficits in dopamine D2-type receptor availability have been linked to substance use disorders, higher availability associates with better behavioral treatment outcomes for stimulant dependence and resilience to addiction. Varenicline has been shown to upregulate D2-type receptors in drug-naive rats, and could be a useful therapeutic approach for the treatment of addictive disorders in humans. The purpose of the study is to assess the relationship between varenicline, dopamine signaling (specifically, D2-type receptor availability), functional connectivity within corticostriatal circuitry, genetic markers associated with smoking and methamphetamine abuse, and measures of cognitive performance. The investigators hypothesize that varenicline but not placebo will upregulate (increase) striatal dopamine D2-type receptor availability and improve cognition, and that the change in availability will correlate with the change in cognition. The investigators also hypothesize that varenicline but not placebo treatment will repair dysregulated connectivity between the striatum and prefrontal cortex observed in methamphetamine users, and will correlate with the change in cognition. The study design consists of two positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans to measure dopamine D2-type receptor availability and functional connectivity between the prefrontal cortex and striatum, two cognitive testing sessions including a battery of tests assessing working memory, declarative memory, sustained attention, inhibitory control, and reward-based decision making. Following eligibility screening, thirty six methamphetamine users will be enrolled and tested/scanned once prior to initiation of varenicline or placebo treatment and then again after completion of treatment.

    at UCLA

  • Relapse Prevention in Stimulant Use Disorder

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The purpose of this study is to assess the relationship between bupropion, stimulant use and relapse, ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder), and measures of mood, drug craving, and inhibitory control in individuals enrolled in inpatient treatment for stimulant-use disorder with and without ADHD. The experimenters hypothesize that Bupropion and Contrave (Bupropion/Naltrexone) will increase inhibitory control and decrease drug craving and depressive symptoms in recently abstinent stimulant users in inpatient treatment with effects greater than those seen in recently abstinent stimulant users completing inpatient treatment as usual. An additional hypothesis is that relapse rates after leaving inpatient treatment in the group receiving bupropion will be lower than those of the group completing inpatient treatment as usual. The study design consists of four assessments of drug craving, inhibitory control, impulsive choice, and mood (depression and anxiety). The timepoints for these assessments include: A. baseline after entering treatment B. 2 weeks after starting drug C. 8 weeks after starting drug, and D. 1 month after leaving treatment. Following eligibility screening, 60 stimulant users will be enrolled in one of 3 groups. Group 1 Bupropion Active Group: 20 subjects will receive bupropion for 8 weeks during inpatient treatment. Group 2 Contrave Active Group: 20 subjects will receive Contrave for 8 weeks during inpatient treatment. Group 3 Control Group: 20 subjects enrolled in inpatient treatment will complete treatment as usual as well as the four assessments (A-D) described above but will not receive drug (convenience control). Half of the subjects in each group will be diagnosed with ADHD and half will not, for a total of 10 subjects per group with ADHD.

    at UCLA

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