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Dyspnea clinical trials at UC Health

2 in progress, 1 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Inhaled Aviptadil for the Treatment of Moderate and Severe COVID-19

    open to eligible people ages 12-85

    Brief Summary: SARS-CoV-2 virus infection is known to cause Lung Injury that begins as dyspnea and exercise intolerance, but may rapidly progress to Critical COVID-19 with Respiratory Failure and the need for noninvasive or mechanical ventilation. Mortality rates as high as 80% have been reported among those who require mechanical ventilation, despite best available intensive care. Patients with moderate and severe COVID-19 by FDA definition who have not developed respiratory failure be treated with nebulized RLF-100 (aviptadil, a synthetic version of Vasoactive Intestinal Polypeptide (VIP)) 100 μg 3x daily plus Standard of Care vs. placebo + Standard of Care using an FDA 501(k) cleared mesh nebulizer. The primary outcome will be progression to in severity of COVID-19 (i.e. moderate progressing to to severe or critical OR severe progressing to critical) over 28 days. Secondary outcomes will include blood oxygenation as measured by pulse oximetry, dyspnea, exercise tolerance, and levels of TNFα IL-6 and other cytokines.

    at UC Irvine

  • Standard of Care Therapy With or Without Stereotactic Radiosurgery and/or Surgery in Treating Patients With Limited Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This randomized phase II/III trial studies how well standard of care therapy with stereotactic radiosurgery and/or surgery works and compares it to standard of care therapy alone in treating patients with breast cancer that has spread to one or two locations in the body (limited metastatic) that are previously untreated. Standard of care therapy comprising chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, biological therapy, and others may help stop the spread of tumor cells. Radiation therapy and/or surgery is usually only given with standard of care therapy to relieve pain; however, in patients with limited metastatic breast cancer, stereotactic radiosurgery, also known as stereotactic body radiation therapy, may be able to send x-rays directly to the tumor and cause less damage to normal tissue and surgery may be able to effectively remove the metastatic tumor cells. It is not yet known whether standard of care therapy is more effective with stereotactic radiosurgery and/or surgery in treating limited metastatic breast cancer.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCSD

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