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Emotional Regulation clinical trials at University of California Health

4 in progress, 2 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Intergenerational Transmission of Traumatic Stress

    open to eligible people ages 3 years and up

    Millions of U.S. parents have experienced trauma, putting them at risk for maladaptive parenting practices, which then confer vulnerabilities to their children. This study aims to enhance understanding of how parental emotional dysregulation associated with traumatic stress impedes effective parenting. The study employs neurophysiological methods (electroencephalogram; EEG) to address some of the challenges inherent in the study of emotion (particularly in trauma-exposed individuals) and to identify potential biomarkers of traumatic stress and response to intervention.

    at UCLA

  • Low Intensity Focused Ultrasound for Emotion Regulation

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    Amygdala is highly involved in emotional response, emotional reactivity and anxiety. Amygdala functions are therefore involved in a wide range of psychiatric disorders including generalized and social anxiety, specific phobia, obsessive compulsive disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder. Therefore, potential clinical implications of amygdala stimulation are great. However, to date, such efforts have been limited by the inability of non-invasive neuromodulation techniques (e.g. transcranial magnetic stimulation - TMS) to reach the amygdala and the highly invasive (i.e. neurosurgical) nature of methods (e.g. deep brain stimulation - DBS) which can, but to our knowledge has rarely been used, target these areas. In order to overcome these current limitations, study invesitgators propose the use of low intensity focused ultrasound pulsation (LIFUP) to affect amygdala activity to improve emotion regulation.

    at UCLA

  • App-Based Mindfulness Meditation for People of Color Who Experience Race-Related Stress

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    In the United States, people of color (POC) are disproportionally affected by stressors related to race/ethnicity compared with their non-Latinx White (NLW). Considering POC exposed to race-related stress are at high risk of developing a mental health disorder, there is a clear need for treatments that allow individuals to cope effectively with these stressors. Among many evidence-based treatments available, mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) may be particularly well suited to help POC cope. MBIs are hypothesized to be effective via increases in mindfulness and self-compassion, as well as reductions in experiential avoidance, rumination, and emotion suppression. Despite their effectiveness, MBIs rarely reach POC. As such, innovative strategies such as self-directed app-based intervention may reduce the treatment gap. Considering the lack of research examining the effectiveness of MBIs among POC, especially those who experience elevated levels of race-related stress, this study will employ a randomized control trial (RCT) approach to examine whether receiving an app-based MBI engages the hypothesized mechanisms of change (i.e., mindfulness, self-compassion, experiential avoidance, rumination, emotion suppression) among POC. Similarly, the study will test whether the intervention leads to decreases in the negative mental health outcomes more often associated with exposure to race-related stress (i.e., stress, anxiety, depression). Acceptability, adherence, and satisfaction also will be analyzed to explore whether a non-culturally adapted MBI is still relevant for POC who face race-related stress. Results from this trial will contribute to the nascent data on MBI acceptability and effectiveness with POC. To the investigators' knowledge, this study will also be the first to include a sample of POC recruited based on elevated levels of race-related stress, a high-risk population that is not commonly targeted in MBI research.

    at UCLA

  • Fidgeting & ADHD study

    “We aim to learn if fidgeting can improve attention and help with emotional regulation in people with ADHD”

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This project will study how fidgeting relates to cognitive and emotional functioning in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). It will determine, in a laboratory setting, whether movement and access to a "fidget device" providing sensory and motor stimulation can improve cognitive and emotional regulation (including on physiological measures) in adult ADHD. The investigators will also acquire pilot data for machine learning analyses to be used in future, large scale studies to identify gestures and touch characteristics associated with improved cognitive and emotional regulation to see if the data can predict and subsequently develop recommendations to improve performance and emotional control in natural settings (e.g., home, office, college classroom) for adult ADHD.

    at UC Davis

Our lead scientists for Emotional Regulation research studies include .

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