Skip to main content

Emotional Regulation clinical trials at University of California Health

3 in progress, 2 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Fidgeting and Attentional and Emotional Regulation in ADHD

    “We aim to learn if fidgeting can improve attention and help with emotional regulation in people with ADHD”

    open to eligible people ages 18-30

    This project will study how fidgeting relates to cognitive and emotional functioning in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). It will determine, in a laboratory setting, whether movement and access to a "fidget device" providing sensory and motor stimulation can improve cognitive and emotional regulation (including on physiological measures) in adult ADHD. The investigators will also acquire pilot data for machine learning analyses to be used in future, large scale studies to identify gestures and touch characteristics associated with improved cognitive and emotional regulation to see if the data can predict and subsequently develop recommendations to improve performance and emotional control in natural settings (e.g., home, office, college classroom) for adult ADHD.

    at UC Davis

  • Social Facilitation of Emotion Regulation in Adolescence

    open to eligible people ages 13-25

    The goal of this project is to test whether regulating emotions with help from a friend is more effective and long-lasting in adolescents than regulating alone, and to characterize age-related differences in the neural mechanisms supporting social versus cognitive emotion regulation. Participants will complete a psychology experiment while undergoing fMRI scanning.

    at UCLA

  • Intergenerational Transmission of Traumatic Stress

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Millions of U.S. parents have experienced trauma, putting them at risk for maladaptive parenting practices, which then confer vulnerabilities to their children. This study aims to enhance understanding of how parental emotional dysregulation associated with traumatic stress impedes effective parenting. The study employs neurophysiological methods (electroencephalogram; EEG) to address some of the challenges inherent in the study of emotion (particularly in trauma-exposed individuals) and to identify potential biomarkers of traumatic stress and response to intervention.

    at UCLA

Our lead scientists for Emotional Regulation research studies include .

Last updated: