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Estrogen Receptor Positive clinical trials at University of California Health

2 in progress, 1 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • T-VEC With Chemotherapy or Endocrine Therapy in Treating Participants With HER2- Negative Breast Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase Ib trials studies the side effects and how well talimogene laherparepvec works when given together with chemotherapy or endocrine therapy in treating patients with breast cancer that does not express the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) protein and has spread to other places in the body (metastatic), cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable), or has come back (recurrent). Biological therapies, such as talimogene laherparepvec, use substances made from living organisms that may attack specific tumor cells and stop them from growing or kill them. Chemotherapy drugs, such as nab-paclitaxel, gemcitabine, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Estrogen can cause the growth of breast cancer cells. Drugs used as endocrine therapy, such as letrozole, anastrozole, exemestane, tamoxifen or fulvestrant, may lessen the amount of estrogen made by the body or may may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking estrogen from connecting to the cancer cells. Giving talimogene laherparepvec with chemotherapy or endocrine therapy may work better in treating patients with HER2-negative breast cancer.

    at UCSF

  • Accelerated Partial Breast Radiation Therapy Using High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy in Treating Patients With Early Stage Breast Cancer After Surgery

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II trial studies how well accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy works in treating patients with breast cancer that has not spread beyond the breast or the axillary lymph nodes (early-stage) after surgery. Radiation therapy uses a type of energy to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Brachytherapy is a type of internal radiation therapy that provides radiation inside the breast to any remaining tumor cells next to the space where the tumor was removed, and is given over a shorter amount of time than standard radiation therapy. Giving accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy may reduce the overall time that radiation is delivered to the tumor cells.

    at UCSD