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Eye Cancer clinical trials at UC Health

3 in progress, 1 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Collecting and Storing Tissue From Young Patients With Cancer

    open to eligible people ages up to 21 years

    This laboratory study is collecting and storing tissue, blood, and bone marrow samples from young patients with cancer. Collecting and storing samples of tissue, blood, and bone marrow from patients with cancer to study in the laboratory may help doctors learn more about changes that may occur in DNA and identify biomarkers related to cancer.

    at UCSF

  • Combination Chemotherapy, Autologous Stem Cell Transplant, and/or Radiation Therapy in Treating Young Patients With Extraocular Retinoblastoma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase III trial is studying the side effects and how well giving combination chemotherapy together with autologous stem cell transplant and/or radiation therapy works in treating young patients with extraocular retinoblastoma. Giving chemotherapy before an autologous stem cell transplant stops the growth of tumor cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. After treatment, stem cells are collected from the patient?s blood and/or bone marrow and stored. More chemotherapy is given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Giving radiation therapy after combination chemotherapy and/or autologous stem cell transplant may kill any remaining tumor cells.

    at UCSF

  • Intra-arterial Melphalan in Treating Younger Patients With Unilateral Retinoblastoma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This pilot clinical trial studies whether unilateral group D retinoblastoma, or retinoblastoma affecting one eye that has spread to the inner jelly like part of the eye, can be treated with a new technique for delivering chemotherapy directly into the blood vessel that supplies the affected eye. This new technique is called intra-arterial injection. Giving melphalan via intra-arterial injection may make it less likely that children will need surgery to remove the eye and may reduce the amount of treatment side effects.

    at UCSF

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