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Functional Constipation clinical trials at University of California Health

2 research studies open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Study of Prucalopride For Functional Constipation in Children and Teenagers

    open to eligible people ages 6 months to 17 years

    Functional constipation is a condition when it is very hard to pass a stool that is not due to any other health problem or to medicines being taken. This condition is more common in children and teenagers. This study has 2 parts: The main aim of the 1st part of the study is to learn if a medicine called prucalopride can improve bowel movements in children and teenagers with functional constipation. Another aim is to check for side effects from 2 different doses of prucalopride. The main aim of the 2nd part of the study is to continue to check for side effects from 2 different doses of prucalopride. In the 1st part, at the first visit, the study doctor will check who can take part. Participants who take part will be picked for 1 of 3 treatments by chance. - A low dose of prucalopride once a day. - A higher dose of prucalopride once a day. - A placebo once a day. In this study, a placebo will look like prucalopride but will not have any medicine in it. Participants will be treated with prucalopride or a placebo for 12 weeks. Participants who took prucalopride will continue to the 2nd part of the study. They will have the same treatment as they did in the 1st part of the study. They will continue with their treatment for another 36 weeks. Participants who took placebo in the 1st part of the study will receive prucalopride in the 2nd part of the study. They will be picked for a low dose or a high dose of prucalopride by chance. Participants will visit the clinic a few times during treatment. The clinic staff will also telephone the participants, or their parents or caregivers throughout treatment for a check-up 4 weeks after last treatment, the clinic staff will telephone the participants, or their parents or caregivers for a final check-up.

    at UCSF

  • Transcutaneous Electrical Acupoint Stimulation (TEAS) for Chronic Constipation

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation (TEAS) is an emerging technology for non-invasive neuromodulation that has broad potential implications and warrants further study. The investigators' clinical experience from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Center for East-West Medicine (CEWM) has also demonstrated that TEAS can be used as an effective self-care tool for patients with chronic illness who do not have the time or resources for frequent acupuncture treatments. Chronic constipation is the chosen area of study because of the large population with a substantial impairment in health-related quality of life and work productivity. The investigators have recently completed a randomized controlled trial (RCT) demonstrating the benefit of perineal self-acupressure on quality of life measurements in this population, which supports investigation into other acupuncture-based self-care interventions. Given these findings, the investigators hypothesize that home patient-administered TEAS can provide measurable improvements in both symptom severity and health related quality of life.

    at UCLA

Our lead scientists for Functional Constipation research studies include .

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