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Ganglioneuroblastoma clinical trials at UC Health

6 in progress, 3 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Treatment Assignment Study in Babies with Neuroblastoma (Cancer)

    open to eligible people ages up to 18 months

    This phase III trial studies how well response and biology-based risk factor-guided therapy works in treating younger patients with non-high risk neuroblastoma. Sometimes a tumor may not need treatment until it progresses. In this case, observation may be sufficient. Measuring biomarkers in tumor cells may help plan when effective treatment is necessary and what the best treatment is. Response and biology-based risk factor-guided therapy may be effective in treating patients with non-high risk neuroblastoma and may help to avoid some of the risks and side effects related to standard treatment.

    at UC Davis UCLA UCSF

  • Biomarkers in Tumor Tissue Samples From Patients With Newly Diagnosed Neuroblastoma or Ganglioneuroblastoma

    open to eligible people ages up to 30 years

    This research trial studies biomarkers in tumor tissue samples from patients with newly diagnosed neuroblastoma or ganglioneuroblastoma. Studying samples of tumor tissue from patients with cancer in the laboratory may help doctors identify and learn more about biomarkers related to cancer.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCLA UCSF

  • Experimental Iobenguane I-131 or Crizotinib and Standard Therapy For Younger Patients With Newly-Diagnosed High-Risk Neuroblastoma

    open to eligible people ages up to 30 years

    This phase III trial studies iobenguane I-131 or crizotinib and standard therapy in treating younger patients with newly-diagnosed high-risk neuroblastoma or ganglioneuroblastoma. Radioactive drugs, such as iobenguane I-131, may carry radiation directly to tumor cells and not harm normal cells. Crizotinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving iobenguane I-131 or crizotinib and standard therapy may work better compared to crizotinib and standard therapy alone in treating younger patients with neuroblastoma or ganglioneuroblastoma.

    at UC Davis UCLA UCSF

  • A Study of Experimental Combination Treatment for Relapsed, Refractory or Progressive Neuroblastoma

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    This phase II trial studies how well irinotecan hydrochloride, temozolomide, and dinutuximab work with or without eflornithine in treating patients with neuroblastoma that has come back (relapsed) or that isn't responding to treatment (refractory). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as irinotecan hydrochloride and temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as dinutuximab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Eflornithine blocks the production of chemicals called polyamines that are important in the growth of cancer cells. Giving eflornithine with irinotecan hydrochloride, temozolomide, and dinutuximab, may work better in treating patients with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma.

    at UC Davis UCSF

  • Induction Therapy Including 131 I-MIBG and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed High-Risk Neuroblastoma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant, Radiation Therapy, and Maintenance Therapy With Isotretinoin

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This clinical trial is studying induction therapy followed by meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) labeled with iodine-131 and chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed high-risk neuroblastoma undergoing stem cell transplant, radiation therapy, and maintenance therapy with isotretinoin. Radioisotope therapy, such as MIBG labeled with iodine-131, releases radiation that kills tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, etoposide, busulfan, and melphalan, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. A peripheral stem cell transplant can replace blood-forming cells that are damaged by MIBG labeled with iodine-131 and chemotherapy.

    at UCSF

  • Irinotecan Hydrochloride and Temozolomide With Temsirolimus or Dinutuximab in Treating Younger Patients With Neuroblastoma

    “Study of Chemotherapy with Immunotherapy (Temsirolimus or Dinutuximab) in treating Neuroblastoma”

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well irinotecan hydrochloride and temozolomide with temsirolimus or dinutuximab work in treating younger patients with neuroblastoma that has returned or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as irinotecan hydrochloride and temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Temsirolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as dinutuximab, may find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them. It is not yet known whether giving irinotecan hydrochloride and temozolomide together with temsirolimus or dinutuximab is more effective in treating neuroblastoma.

    at UC Davis UCSF

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