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Genital Neoplasms clinical trials at University of California Health

6 in progress, 3 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • AB-1015, an Integrated Circuit T (ICT) Cell Therapy in Patients With Platinum Resistant Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    open to eligible females ages 18 years and up

    This is a multi-center, open-label phase 1 dose escalation trial that uses a modified 3+3 design to identify a recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D) of AB-1015 cell product. Backfill cohorts will enroll additional subjects at doses deemed to be safe for a total enrollment of up to 12 subjects per each backfill cohort on the protocol.

    at UCSF

  • Targeted Therapy Directed by Genetic Testing in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Advanced Solid Tumors, The ComboMATCH Screening Trial

    open to all eligible people

    This ComboMATCH patient screening trial is the gateway to a coordinated set of clinical trials to study cancer treatment directed by genetic testing. Patients with solid tumors that have spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced) or have spread to other places in the body (advanced) and have progressed on at least one line of standard systemic therapy or have no standard treatment that has been shown to prolong overall survival may be candidates for these trials. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with some genetic changes or abnormalities (mutations) may benefit from treatment that targets that particular genetic mutation. ComboMATCH is designed to match patients to a treatment that may work to control their tumor and may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with locally advanced or advanced solid tumors.

    at UCSF

  • PROmOting Gynecologic Cancer Patients With Frailty to Achieve Functional Recovery

    open to eligible females ages 18 years and up

    This study seeks to understand how frailty, a term that describes people who are more vulnerable stressors such as a new medical problem, affects the outcomes and quality of life in adult patients with gynecologic cancer.

    at UCSF

  • Brachytherapy With Durvalumab or Tremelimumab for the Treatment of Patients With Platinum-Resistant, Refractory, Recurrent, or Metastatic Gynecological Malignancies

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well brachytherapy with durvalumab or tremelimumab work for the treatment of gynecological malignancies that is resistant to platinum therapy (platinum-resistant), does not respond to treatment (refractory), has come back (recurrent), or has spread to other places in body (metastatic). Brachytherapy, also known as internal radiation therapy, uses radioactive material placed directly into or near a tumor to kill tumor cells. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab and tremelimumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. This trial is being done to see whether brachytherapy with durvalumab or tremelimumab works better in treating patients with gynecological malignancies.

    at UCLA

  • P-PSMA-101 CAR-T Cells in the Treatment of Subjects With Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer (mCRPC) and Advanced Salivary Gland Cancers (SGC)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    An open-label, multi-center, single and cyclic ascending dose study of P-PSMA-101 autologous CAR-T cells in patients with mCRPC and SGC.

    at UCSD UCSF

  • Testing AZD1775 inC Combination With Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy in Cervical, Upper Vaginal and Uterine Cancers

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of adavosertib when given together with external beam radiation therapy and cisplatin in treating patients with cervical, vaginal, or uterine cancer. Adavosertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. External beam radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving adavosertib, external beam radiation therapy, and cisplatin may work better in treating patients with cervical, vaginal, or uterine cancer.

    at UC Davis

Our lead scientists for Genital Neoplasms research studies include .

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