Skip to main content

Gliosarcoma clinical trials at UC Health
19 in progress, 3 open to eligible people

  • DSC-MRI in Measuring Relative Cerebral Blood Volume for Early Response to Bevacizumab in Patients With Recurrent Glioblastoma

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies how well dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) works in measuring relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) for early response to bevacizumab in patients with glioblastoma that has come back. DSC-MRI may help evaluate changes in the blood vessels within the cancer to determine a patient?s response to treatment.

    at UC Irvine

  • ERC1671/GM-CSF/Cyclophosphamide for the Treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II clinical trial studies how well ERC1671 plus Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) plus Cyclophosphamide with Bevacizumab works compared to Placebo Injection plus Placebo Pill with Bevacizumab in treating patients with recurrent/progressive, bevacizumab naïve glioblastoma multiforme and gliosarcoma (World Health Organization (WHO) grade IV malignant gliomas, GBM).

    at UC Irvine

  • MDM2 Inhibitor AMG-232 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of MDM2 inhibitor AMG-232 in treating patients with glioblastoma that is newly diagnosed or has come back. MDM2 inhibitor AMG-232 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    at UCLA

  • A Study of ABT-414 in Subjects With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma (GBM) With Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Amplification

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study seeks to determine whether the addition of ABT-414 to concomitant radiotherapy and temozolomide (TMZ) followed by combination of ABT-414 with adjuvant TMZ prolongs overall survival (OS) among participants with newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GBM) with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) amplification. In addition, there is a Phase 1, open-label, multicenter sub-study to assess the pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of ABT-414 in participants with newly diagnosed EGFR-amplified GBM who have mild or moderate hepatic impairment.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Adavosertib and Local Radiation Therapy in Treating Children With Newly Diagnosed Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Gliomas

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of adavosertib when given together with local radiation therapy in treating children with newly diagnosed diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas. Adavosertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays, gamma rays, neutrons, protons, or other sources to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving adavosertib with local radiation therapy may work better than local radiation therapy alone in treating diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas.

    at UCSF

  • Anti-LAG-3 Alone & in Combination w/ Nivolumab Treating Patients w/ Recurrent GBM (Anti-CD137 Arm Closed 10/16/18)

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This phase I trial studies the safety and best dose of anti-LAG-3 (anti-LAG-3 monoclonal antibody BMS-986016) or urelumab alone and in combination with nivolumab in treating patients with glioblastoma that has returned (recurrent). Anti-LAG-3 monoclonal antibody BMS-986016, urelumab, and nivolumab are antibodies (a type of protein) that may stimulate the cells in the immune system to attack tumor cells. It is not yet known whether anti-LAG-3 monoclonal antibody BMS-986016 or urelumab alone or in combination with nivolumab may kill more tumor cells. (The Anti-CD137 antibody (BMS-663513 - urelumab) treatment arm closed by BMS on 10/16/18 due to closure of BMS Urelumab development program. Subjects currently on treatment may continue.)

    at UCLA

  • Bevacizumab and Temozolomide in Treating Older Patients With Newly-Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme or Gliosarcoma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    RATIONALE: Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide, also work in different ways to kill tumor cells or stop them from growing. Giving bevacizumab together with temozolomide may be a better way to block tumor growth.

    PURPOSE: This phase II trial is studying how well giving bevacizumab and temozolomide together works in treating older patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme or gliosarcoma.

    at UCLA

  • Bevacizumab With or Without Trebananib in Treating Patients With Recurrent Brain Tumors

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This partially randomized phase II trial with a safety run-in component studies the side effects and how well bevacizumab given with or without trebananib works in treating patients with brain tumors that have come back (recurrent). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Trebananib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking blood flow to the tumor. It is not yet known whether giving bevacizumab together with trebananib is more effective than bevacizumab alone in treating brain tumors.

    at UC Irvine

  • Combination Adenovirus + Pembrolizumab to Trigger Immune Virus Effects

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Glioblastoma (GBM) and gliosarcoma (GS) are the most common and aggressive forms of malignant brain tumor in adults and can be resistant to conventional therapies. The purpose of this Phase II study is to evaluate how well a recurrent glioblastoma or gliosarcoma tumor responds to one injection of DNX-2401, a genetically modified oncolytic adenovirus, when delivered directly into the tumor followed by the administration of intravenous pembrolizumab (an immune checkpoint inhibitor) given every 3 weeks for up to 2 years or until disease progression. Funding Source-FDA OOPD

    at UCLA

  • Dose-Escalated Photon IMRT or Proton Beam Radiation Therapy Versus Standard-Dose Radiation Therapy and Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well dose-escalated photon intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or proton beam radiation therapy works compared with standard-dose radiation therapy when given with temozolomide in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays and other types of radiation to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Specialized radiation therapy that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Drugs, such as temozolomide, may make tumor cells more sensitive to radiation therapy. It is not yet known whether dose-escalated photon IMRT or proton beam radiation therapy is more effective than standard-dose radiation therapy with temozolomide in treating glioblastoma.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine

  • Ipilimumab and/or Nivolumab in Combination With Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma or Gliosarcoma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I trial studies the safety and best dose of ipilimumab, nivolumab, or both in combination with temozolomide in treating patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma or gliosarcoma. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab and nivolumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known which combination is a better treatment for glioblastoma or gliosarcoma.

    at UCSF

  • Lapatinib Ditosylate Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Recurrent High-Grade Glioma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This pilot phase I clinical trial studies how well lapatinib ditosylate before surgery works in treating patients with high-grade glioma that has come back after a period of time during which the tumor could not be detected. Lapatinib ditosylate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    at UCLA

  • Sapanisertib Before and After Surgery in Treating Patients With Recurrent Glioblastoma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This partially randomized pilot phase I trial studies how much sapanisertib reaches the brain tumor and how well it works when given before and after surgery in treating patients with glioblastoma that has grown or come back and requires surgery. Sapanisertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Study of Binimetinib With Encorafenib in Adults With Recurrent BRAF V600-Mutated HGG

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The goal of this study is to estimate the efficacy of encorafenib and binimetinib as measured by radiographic response in recurrent high-grade primary brain tumors.

    at UCLA

  • Temozolomide With or Without Veliparib in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase II/III trial studies how well temozolomide and veliparib work compared to temozolomide alone in treating patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Veliparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether temozolomide is more effective with or without veliparib in treating glioblastoma multiforme.

    at UC Davis UCSD UCSF

  • Vaccine Therapy With Bevacizumab Versus Bevacizumab Alone in Treating Patients With Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well giving vaccine therapy with or without bevacizumab works in treating patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme that can be removed by surgery. Vaccines consisting of heat shock protein-peptide complexes made from a person's own tumor tissue may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells that may remain after surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them. It is not yet known whether giving vaccine therapy is more effective with or without bevacizumab in treating glioblastoma multiforme.

    at UCSF

  • Vorinostat and Radiation Therapy Followed by Maintenance Therapy With Vorinostat in Treating Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I/II trial studies the side effects and best dose of vorinostat and to see how well it works when given together with radiation therapy followed by maintenance therapy with vorinostat in treating younger patients with newly diagnosed diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (a brainstem tumor). Vorinostat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Giving vorinostat together with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells.

    at UCSF

  • Vorinostat and Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Malignant Gliomas

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I trial is studying the side effects and best dose of vorinostat when given together with temozolomide in treating patients with malignant gliomas. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vorinostat and temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Vorinostat may also stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Vorinostat may help temozolomide work better by making tumor cells more sensitive to the drug. Giving vorinostat together with temozolomide may kill more tumor cells.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Vorinostat, Temozolomide, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I/II trial studies the side effects and best dose of vorinostat when given together with temozolomide and radiation therapy and to see how well they work in treating patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme. Vorinostat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Giving vorinostat together with temozolomide and radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells.

    at UCSF

Last updated: