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Hematologic Malignancies clinical trials at University of California Health

10 in progress, 3 open to eligible people

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  • A Multicenter Access and Distribution Protocol for Unlicensed Cryopreserved Cord Blood Units (CBUs)

    “Assessing new blood cells growth after transplant using cord blood units that do not meet FDA guidelines but meet NMDP guidelines”

    open to all eligible people

    This study is an access and distribution protocol for unlicensed cryopreserved cord blood units (CBUs) in pediatric and adult patients with hematologic malignancies and other indications.

    at UCLA UCSD UCSF

  • Comparing Cyclophosphamide and Abatacept With Standard of Care Treatment Following Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients With Hematologic Malignancy

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the combination of cyclophosphamide and abatacept versus the treatment used in standard of care will reduce the incidence of moderate and severe chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. GVHD occurs when the cells from your donor (the graft) see your body's cells (the host) as different and attack them.

    at UCSD

  • Long-term Follow-Up Study Following Treatment With Fate Therapeutics' Engineered Cellular Immunotherapy

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of the study is to assess long-term side effects from subjects who receive a Fate Therapeutics genetically modified NK cell product. Subjects who previously took part in a Fate Therapeutics study and received genetically changed NK cells will take part in this long-term follow-up study. Subjects will join this study once they complete the parent interventional study. No additional study drug will be given, but subjects can receive other therapies for their cancer while they are being followed for long term safety in this study. For a period of 15 years starting from the last administration of Fate Therapeutics genetically modified NK cell product, subjects will be assessed for long-term safety and survival through questionnaires and blood tests.

    at UCSD

  • A Study of Haploidentical Bone Marrow Transplant for Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    The primary objective is to determine overall survival 180 days after transplantation involving HLA-haploidentical stem cell/bone marrow graft, and post-transplant Cy.

    at UCSD

  • An Open-Label, Dose-Escalation/Dose-Expansion Safety Study of INCB059872 in Subjects With Advanced Malignancies

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is an open-label, dose-escalation/dose-expansion study of INCB059872 in subjects with advanced malignancies. The study will be conducted in 4 parts. Part 1 (mono therapy dose escalation) will determine the recommended dose(s) of INCB059872 for dose expansion, based on maximum tolerated dose and/or a tolerated pharmacologically active dose. Part 2 (dose expansion) will further determine the safety, tolerability, efficacy, PK, and PD of the selected monotherapy dose(s) in AML/MDS, SCLC, myelofibrosis, Ewing sarcoma, and poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumors. Part 3 will determine the recommended dose(s) of INCB059872 in combination with azacitadine and all-trans retinoic acid in AML and in combination with nivolumab in SCLC. Part 4 will further determine the safety, tolerability, efficacy, PK, and PD of the selected combination dose(s) in Part 3.

    at UCLA UCSD

  • CB-Long-Term Safety Study (CB-LTSS)

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    This is a non-interventional, long-term safety study of allogeneic CAR-T cell therapy in patients with hematologic malignancies. Its purpose of is to collect long-term observational data to identify and understand potential late side effects in patients who have received CAR-T cell therapies.

    at UC Irvine

  • Composite Health Assessment Risk Model (CHARM) for Older Adults (BMT CTN 1704)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Prospective observational multicenter study of allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HCT) in recipients 60 years and older to assess important determinants of health status to be combined into a composite health risk model to improve risk assessment of non-relapse mortality (NRM).

    at UCSF

  • Safety and Efficacy of ATIR101 as Adjunctive Treatment to Blood Stem Cell Transplantation From a Haploidentical Family Donor Compared to Post-transplant Cyclophosphamide in Patients With Blood Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The primary objective of this study is to compare safety and efficacy of a haploidentical T-cell depleted HSCT and adjunctive treatment with ATIR101 versus a haploidentical T cell replete HSCT with post-transplant administration of high dose cyclophosphamide (PTCy) in patients with a hematologic malignancy. An additional objective of the study is to compare the effect of the two treatments on quality of life.

    at UCLA UCSD

  • Study of ProTmune for Allogeneic HCT in Adult Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study is a Phase 1, Non-randomized, Open-label/Phase 2 Randomized, Blinded Study of ProTmune (ex vivo programmed mobilized peripheral blood cells) Versus Non-programmed mobilized peripheral blood cells for Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (HCT) in Adult Subjects Aged 18 years and older with Hematologic Malignancies. A maximum of 80 total eligible subjects will be enrolled and treated in the trial at approximately 15-20 centers in the US.

    at UCSD

  • Study of Thiotepa and TEPA Drug Exposure in Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Patients

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Thiotepa is a chemotherapy drug used extensively in bone marrow transplantation. Thiotepa is a prodrug that undergoes metabolic conversion in the liver by CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 to its primary active metabolite, TEPA. The goal of this study is to determine what causes some children to have different drug concentrations of thiotepa and TEPA in their bodies and if drug levels are related to whether or not a child experiences severe side-effects during their bone marrow transplant. The hypothesis is that certain clinical and genetic factors cause changes in thiotepa and TEPA drug levels in pediatric bone marrow transplant patients and that high levels may cause severe side-effects.

    at UCSF

Our lead scientists for Hematologic Malignancies research studies include .

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