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IDH2 Gene Mutation clinical trials at UC Health
3 in progress, 1 open to new patients

  • Olaparib in Treating Patients With Advanced Glioma, Cholangiocarcinoma, or Solid Tumors With IDH1 or IDH2 Mutations

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies how well olaparib works in treating patients with glioma, cholangiocarcinoma, or solid tumors with IDH1 or IDH2 mutations that have spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment. Olaparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    at UC Davis

  • BGB-290 and Temozolomide in Treating Isocitrate Dehydrogenase (IDH)1/2-Mutant Grade I-IV Gliomas

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of BGB-290 and temozolomide in treating adolescents and young adults with IDH1/2-mutant grade I-IV glioma that is newly diagnosed or has come back. BGB-290 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving BGB-290 and temozolomide may work better in treating adolescents and young adults with IDH1/2-mutant grade I-IV glioma.

    at UCSF

  • CPX-351 and Enasidenib in Treating Patients With Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia Characterized by IDH2 Mutation

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This phase II trial studies how well CPX-351 and enasidenib work in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia characterized by IHD2 mutation that has come back. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as CPX-351, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Enasidenib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving CPX-351 and enasidenib may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    at UCLA UC Davis UCSD UCSF

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