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Leiomyosarcoma clinical trials at University of California Health

6 in progress, 3 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Study of Experimental Tabelecleucel in Subjects with Epstein-Barr Virus-associated Diseases (Mono)

    open to all eligible people

    The purpose of this study is to assess the efficacy and safety of tabelecleucel in participants with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) associated diseases.

    at UC Davis

  • Nivolumab and BO-112 Before Surgery for the Treatment of Resectable Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of BO-112 when given together with nivolumab before surgery in treating patients with soft tissue sarcoma that can be removed by surgery (resectable). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Immunotherapy with BO-112, may induce changes in body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving nivolumab and BO-112 before surgery may work better in treating patients with soft tissue sarcoma compared to nivolumab alone.

    at UCLA

  • Phase III Trial of Anlotinib, Catequentinib in Advanced Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma, Leiomyosarcoma, Synovial Sarcoma (APROMISS)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study evaluates the safety and efficacy of AL3818 (anlotinib) hydrochloride in the treatment of metastatic or advanced alveolar soft part sarcoma (ASPS), leiomyosarcoma (LMS), and synovial sarcoma (SS). All participants with ASPS will receive open-label AL3818. In participants with LMS or SS, AL3818 will be compared to IV dacarbazine. Two-thirds of the participants will receive AL3818, one-third of the participants will receive IV dacarbazine.

    at UCLA

  • Observation, Radiation Therapy, Combination Chemotherapy, and/or Surgery in Treating Young Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase III trial is studying observation to see how well a risk based treatment strategy works in patients with soft tissue sarcoma. In the study, patients are assigned to receive surgery +/- radiotherapy +/- chemotherapy depending on their risk of recurrence. Sometimes, after surgery, the tumor may not need additional treatment until it progresses. In this case, observation may be sufficient. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as ifosfamide and doxorubicin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving chemotherapy and radiation therapy before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed. Giving these treatments after surgery may kill any tumor cells that remain after surgery.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Radiation Therapy With or Without Combination Chemotherapy or Pazopanib Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Non-rhabdomyosarcoma Soft Tissue Sarcomas That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase II/III trial studies how well pazopanib, when combined with chemotherapy and radiation therapy or radiation therapy alone, work in the treatment of patients with newly diagnosed non-rhabdomyosarcoma soft tissue sarcomas that can eventually be removed by surgery. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as ifosfamide and doxorubicin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Pazopanib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether these therapies can be safely combined and if they work better when given together in treating patients with non-rhabdomyosarcoma soft tissue sarcomas.

    at UC Davis UCLA UCSF

  • Talimogene Laherparepvec and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Soft Tissue Sarcoma That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of talimogene laherparepvec and radiation therapy and to see how well they work in treating patients with newly diagnosed soft tissue sarcoma that can be removed by surgery. Biological therapies, such as talimogene laherparepvec, use substances made from living organisms that may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays, photons. electrons, or protons to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving talimogene laherparepvec and radiation therapy may work better in treating patients with soft tissue sarcoma.

    at UC Irvine

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