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Lung Transplant clinical trials at UC Health
11 in progress, 5 open to eligible people

  • A Clinical Trial to Demonstrate the Effectiveness and Safety of Liposomal Cyclosporine A Inhalation Solution in the Treatment of Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome in Patients Post Double Lung Transplant

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase III randomized, controlled clinical trial of L-CsA for the treatment of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome in adults diagnosed with BOS following double lung transplant. Patients will receive either L-CsA (10 mg) via the PARI Investigational eFlow® Device twice daily plus Standard of Care (SoC) treatment, or SoC alone, for a period of 48 weeks. All patients will be eligible to continue in an open-label extension trial of L-CsA following completion of BOSTON-2.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • A Clinical Trial to Demonstrate the Effectiveness and Safety of Liposomal Cyclosporine A Inhalation Solution in the Treatment of Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome in Patients Post Single Lung Transplant

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase III randomized, controlled clinical trial of L-CsA for the treatment of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome in adults diagnosed with BOS following single lung transplant. Patients will receive either L-CsA (5 mg) via the PARI Investigational eFlow® Device twice daily plus Standard of Care (SoC) treatment, or SoC alone, for a period of 48 weeks. All patients will be eligible to continue in an open-label extension trial of L-CsA following completion of BOSTON-1.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • OCS™ Lung TOP Registry

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Single-arm, prospective, multi-center, post-approval U.S. registry

    at UCLA

  • Pirfenidone for Restrictive Chronic Lung Allograft Dysfunction

    open to eligible people ages 18-80

    Despite advances in lung transplantation, the median survival remains only 55% at 5 years. The main limitation to long term survival is the development of chronic lung allograft dysfunction. In approximately 30% of cases, chronic lung allograft dysfunction has a restrictive phenotype (RCLAD) characterized by fibrosis with rapid progression to respiratory failure. Approximately 60% of patients with RCLAD die within one year, as currently there are no therapies available. RCLAD, like Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF), is characterized by fibroblast proliferation, extracellular matrix deposition, and architectural distortion leading to progressive lung scarring and death. Given their similarities, there is keen interest in the international transplant community to investigate whether the anti-fibrotic drug pirfenidone can slow the progression of RCLAD as it does of IPF. Pirfenidone has been proved to be safe and effective in patients with IPF, and is approved by the Food and Drug Administration. This protocol will evaluate the safety and tolerability of pirfenidone in lung transplant recipients with RCLAD. Transplant recipients take carefully adjusted immunosuppressive medications for life to prevent rejection of the allograft. Current literature suggests the dose of tacrolimus, the main anti-rejection drug, may need to be adjusted when taken in combination with pirfenidone. The investigators will assess the side effects of pirfenidone in combination with the immunosuppressive regimen and determine the magnitude of the adjustment in tacrolimus dose. The results of this pilot study will provide the foundation for a multicenter randomized control trial to evaluate the efficacy of pirfenidone in slowing the progression of RCLAD.

    at UCSF

  • Trial to Evaluate the Safety and Effectiveness of the Portable Organ Care System (OCS™) Lung System for Recruiting, Preserving and Assessing Non-Ideal Donor Lungs for Transplantation

    open to eligible people ages 18-75

    To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the OCS™ Lung System to recruit, preserve and assess non-ideal donor lungs that may not meet current standard donor lung acceptance criteria for transplantation.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • CLAD Phenotype Specific Risk Factors and Mechanisms

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    While many patients experience benefits from transplant, complications such as infections and lung rejection may affect long term survival and quality of life. In this study doctors are looking at a complication called Chronic Lung Allograft Dysfunction (CLAD). CLAD is thought to be chronic rejection of the lung by the immune system and is the leading cause of death after lung transplantation. The purpose of this study is to help doctors determine: - why some people get CLAD and others do not - how patients who get CLAD do after CLAD is diagnosed - how CLAD may affect quality of life

    at UCLA

  • Clinical Trials in Organ Transplantation Extension Study

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The purpose of the study is to continue to follow subjects who were enrolled in the CTOT-20 CLAD Phenotypes study. Subjects will provide clinical data and complete quality of life questionnaires that will be used to determine the clinical factors associated with the development of Chronic Lung Allograft Dysfunction (CLAD) after lung transplant.

    at UCLA

  • Macitentan in the Treatment of Organ Rejection After Lung Transplantation

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Potential therapy with MACITENTAN in the treatment of Chronic Lung Allograft Dysfunction (CLAD) after Lung Transplantation. Pilot Study, Double-blind, "ADD-ON Therapy" with MACITENTAN to "usual standard of care immunosuppressive therapies" after lung transplantation for established BOS Stages I or II versus a "matched control group" who receive "usual standard of care immunosuppressive therapies" alone, results in a decrease in the Primary Endpoint: "rate of decline" in "Forced Expiratory Volume-1 sec (FEV1) versus time" while Secondary Endpoints including: differences in Six minute walk distance (6MWD), BORG Score, corrected single-breath diffusing capacity (DCO corrected) at time intervals of 1, 3, 6 months on therapy. Specific biomarkers for BOS, including inflammatory chemokines, which are routinely collected in the context of post-transplant "surveillance" will be analyzed. Chemokines which our group has previously described in the pathogenesis of the continuum of "acute-to-chronic lung allograft rejection", have included both C-C (CCL2, CCL5) and CXC (CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11) chemokines as determined in bronchial-alveolar lavage (BAL).

    at UCLA

  • Preventing Rehospitalization in Lung Transplant Recipients Utilizing mHealth

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    Lung transplantation has several important aims: 1) extend survival; 2) relieve disability, and 3) improve health-related quality of life (HRQL) for adults suffering from end-stage lung disease. Advances in medical therapies and changes in the US organ allocation system in 2005 have prioritized lung transplant for sicker and older patients. This achievement has come at substantial cost, including recent trends in recipients towards increased disability, poorer health-related quality of life, and increased longer-term mortality. Additionally, lung transplant recipients have the highest risk of unexpected readmission after the index admission, with published rates of 40-43%. Frailty at the time of discharge is one of the leading factors for readmission. The investigator's belief is that improving access to individualized exercise training plans that are modified based on a patient's progress and needs will greatly improve a transplant recipient's level of physical fitness and independence, and decrease the risk of hospital readmission. This will lead to an overall improvement in a patient's quality of life.

    at UCSF

  • Rapid Detection of Airway Pathogens for Lung Transplantation

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    Pneumonias and lower respiratory tract infections can have important long-term consequences, particularly in the context of lung transplantation, where pneumonia is a major cause of death. Candidate organs and lung transplant recipients undergo bronchoscopic inspection to assess for lower respiratory tract infection, but traditional culture methods take time, leading to increased risk from inappropriate therapy. The investigators hypothesize that the rapid detection of lower respiratory tract infection, using a semi-quantitative multiplex molecular assay, can decrease the time to appropriate clinical decision making.

    at UCSF

  • Safety and Efficacy of Itacitinib in Participants With Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome Following Lung Transplantation

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety, efficacy, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of itacitinib in participants with post-lung transplant bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS).

    at UCLA

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