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Macular Edema clinical trials at UC Health
8 in progress, 2 open to new patients

  • A Study of Experimental Treatment With Micropulse for Diabetic Macular Edema (build-up of fluid in the eye)

    “This study will test the effect of using the subthreshold micropulse diode laser (SML).”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Diabetic retinopathy is one of the most common complications of diabetes and diabetic macular edema (DME) is one of the most common causes of vision loss in diabetes. The purpose of this study is to determine if early intervention with micropulse laser treatment in eyes with good visual acuity (20/32 or better) will improve or stabilize vision loss due to the complications of diabetic macular edema.

    at UC Davis

  • Macular Edema Ranibizumab v. Intravitreal Anti-inflammatory Therapy Trial

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The Macular Edema Ranibizumab v. Intravitreal anti-inflammatory Therapy (MERIT) Trial will compare the relative efficacy and safety of intravitreal methotrexate, intravitreal ranibizumab, and the intravitreal dexamethasone implant for the treatment of uveitic macular edema persisting or reoccurring after an intravitreal corticosteroid injection. MERIT is a parallel design (1:1:1), randomized comparative trial with an anniversary close-out at the 6 month clinic visit. The primary outcome is percent change in central subfield thickness from the baseline OCT measurement to the 12 week visit.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • A Study to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Faricimab (RO6867461) in Participants With Diabetic Macular Edema

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This study will evaluate the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of faricimab administered at 8-week intervals or as specified in the protocol following treatment initiation, compared with aflibercept once every 8 weeks (Q8W), in participants with diabetic macular edema (DME).

    at UCSD

  • A Study to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Faricimab (RO6867461) in Participants With Diabetic Macular Edema (YOSEMITE)

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This study will evaluate the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of faricimab administered at 8-week intervals or as specified in the protocol following treatment initiation, compared with aflibercept once every 8 weeks (Q8W), in participants with diabetic macular edema (DME).

    at UCLA UC Davis

  • Anti-VEGF Treatment for Prevention of PDR/DME

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Multiple studies have implicated vascular endothelial growth factor VEGF as a major causative factor in human eye diseases characterized by neovascularization including proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) and vascular permeability including diabetic macular edema (DME). While there is strong evidence that PDR outcomes are markedly reduced in eyes that are treated with monthly anti-VEGF therapy (A Study of Ranibizumab Injection in Subjects With Clinically Significant Macular Edema (ME) With Center Involvement Secondary to Diabetes Mellitus: RIDE/RISE) and moderately reduced in eyes that received fairly frequent dosing during the 1st year of treatment (Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network protocol I), it is unknown whether or not an earlier but less frequent dosing regimen would result in similar, favorable anatomic outcomes, and whether favorable anatomic outcomes subsequently would result in favorable visual acuity outcomes. If this study demonstrates that intravitreous aflibercept treatment is effective and safe for reducing the onset of PDR or center involved- DME (CI-DME) in eyes that are at high risk for these complications, a new strategy to prevent vision threatening complications of diabetes will be available for patients. The application of intravitreous aflibercept earlier in the course of disease (i.e., at the time when an eye has baseline severe non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy) could help to reduce future potential treatment burden in patients, at the same time resulting in similar or better long-term visual outcomes, if PDR and DME are prevented. The primary objectives of this protocol are to 1) determine the efficacy and safety of intravitreous aflibercept injections versus sham injections (observation) for prevention of PDR or CI-DME in eyes at high risk for development of these complications and 2) compare long-term visual outcomes in eyes that receive anti-VEGF therapy early in the course of disease with those that are observed initially, and treated only if high-risk PDR or CI-DME with vision loss develops. Secondary objectives include: - Comparing other visual acuity outcomes between treatment groups, such as proportion of eyes with at least 10 or at least 15 letter loss from baseline, or gain or loss of at least 5 letters at the consecutive study visit just before and at the 2- or 4-year visit - Comparing optical coherence tomography (OCT) outcomes, such as mean change in OCT central subfield thickness and volume from baseline - Comparing proportion of eyes with at least 2 and 3-step worsening or improvement of diabetic retinopathy severity level (scale for individual eyes) by central reading center from baseline - Comparing associated treatment and follow-up exam costs between treatment groups - Comparing safety outcomes between treatment groups

    at UC Davis

  • Laser vs Bevacizumab Injection Alone in Treatment of Diabetic Macular Edema

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Currently, diabetic macular edema is treated is through injection of a medications such as off-label bevacizumab, which decreases the swelling in the retina. These injections are sometimes required monthly until the condition is controlled. Recently, there have been some new FDA approved treatments using laser that decrease the swelling. These approximately ten minute treatments do not require injections and don't cause permanent damage to the eye, and they may decrease the number of injections one needs to get to treat diabetic macular edema (DME). The purpose of this randomized clinical trial is to determine whether subvisible laser in combination with intravitreal bevacizumab is non-inferior compared to current standard of care (intravitreal bevacizumab alone) in achieving favorable outcomes for visual acuity, mean macular thickness, and patient quality of life, and has fewer needed intravitreal bevacizumab injections throughout the course of the 12 month study period.

    at UCSF

  • Predicting Diabetic Retinopathy From Risk Factor Data and Digital Retinal Images

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The objective of this study is to compare the results of a deep learning approach to diabetic retinopathy assessment with results from (1) an in-person examination with an ophthalmologist, and (2) the assessments of optometrists involved in a teleretinal screening program.

    at UCLA

  • Suprachoroidal Injection of Triamcinolone Acetonide With IVT Aflibercept in Subjects With Macular Edema Following RVO

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a Phase 3, multicenter, randomized, masked, controlled, parallel group study of 12 months duration in treatment naïve subjects with RVO.

    at UCSD

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