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Metastatic Osteosarcoma clinical trials at University of California Health

4 in progress, 2 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • SARC038: Phase 2 Study of Regorafenib and Nivolumab in Osteosarcoma

    open to eligible people ages 5 years and up

    A phase 2 study of regorafenib in combination with nivolumab in patients with refractory or recurrent osteosarcoma.

    at UCLA

  • Thoracotomy Versus Thoracoscopic Management of Pulmonary Metastases in Patients With Osteosarcoma

    open to eligible people ages up to 50 years

    This phase III trial compares the effect of open thoracic surgery (thoracotomy) to thoracoscopic surgery (video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery or VATS) in treating patients with osteosarcoma that has spread to the lung (pulmonary metastases). Open thoracic surgery is a type of surgery done through a single larger incision (like a large cut) that goes between the ribs, opens up the chest, and removes the cancer. Thoracoscopy is a type of chest surgery where the doctor makes several small incisions and uses a small camera to help with removing the cancer. This trial is being done evaluate the two different surgery methods for patients with osteosarcoma that has spread to the lung to find out which is better.

    at UCSF

  • Denosumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Osteosarcoma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II trial studies how well denosumab works in treating patients with osteosarcoma that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as denosumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.

    at UC Davis UCSF

  • Dinutuximab in Combination With Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Recurrent Osteosarcoma

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II trial studies how well dinutuximab works when given with sargramostim in treating patients with osteosarcoma that has come back after treatment (recurrent). Monoclonal antibodies, such as dinutuximab, may find tumor cells and help kill them. Sargramostim may help the body increase the amount of white blood cells it produces, which help the body fight off infections. Giving dinutuximab with sargramostim may work better and kill more cancer cells.

    at UC Davis UCSF

Our lead scientists for Metastatic Osteosarcoma research studies include .

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