Skip to main content

Microsatellite Instability clinical trials at University of California Health

5 in progress, 2 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Study of RP1 Monotherapy and RP1 in Combination With Nivolumab

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    RPL-001-16 is a Phase 1/2, open label, dose escalation and expansion clinical study of RP1 alone and in combination with nivolumab in adult subjects with advanced and/or refractory solid tumors, to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D), as well as to evaluate preliminary efficacy.

    at UC Irvine UCLA UCSD UCSF

  • Long-term, Non-interventional, Observational Study Following Treatment With Fate Therapeutics FT500 Cellular Immunotherapy

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Subjects who previously took part in the FT500-101 study and received allogeneic NK cell immunotherapy will take part in this long term follow-up study. Subjects will automatically enroll into study FT-003 once they have withdrawn or complete the parent interventional study. The purpose of this study is to provide long-term safety and survival data for subjects who have participated in the parent study. No additional study drug will be given, but subjects can receive other therapies for their cancer while they are being followed for long term safety in this study.

    at UCSD

  • Combination Chemotherapy, Bevacizumab, and/or Atezolizumab in Treating Patients With Deficient DNA Mismatch Repair Metastatic Colorectal Cancer, the COMMIT Study

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This phase III trial studies how well combination chemotherapy, bevacizumab, and/or atezolizumab work in treating patients with deficient deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mismatch repair colorectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Chemotherapy drugs, such as fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and leucovorin calcium, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Bevacizumab may stop or slow colorectal cancer by blocking the growth of new blood vessels necessary for tumor growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving combination chemotherapy, bevacizumab, and atezolizumab may work better in treating patients with colorectal cancer.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine

  • FT500 as Monotherapy and in Combination With Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in Subjects With Advanced Solid Tumors

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    FT500 is an off-the-shelf, iPSC-derived NK cell product that can bridge innate and adaptive immunity, and has the potential to overcome multiple mechanisms of immune checkpoint inhibitor (ICI) resistance. The preclinical data provide compelling evidence supporting the clinical investigation of FT500 as monotherapy and in combination with ICI in subjects with advanced solid tumors.

    at UCSD

  • Study of Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) vs Standard Therapy in Participants With Microsatellite Instability-High (MSI-H) or Mismatch Repair Deficient (dMMR) Stage IV Colorectal Carcinoma (MK-3475-177/KEYNOTE-177)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    In this study, participants with stage IV Microsatellite Instability-High (MSI-H) or Mismatch Repair Deficient (dMMR) colorectal carcinoma (CRC) will be randomly assigned to receive either pembrolizumab or the Investigator's choice of 1 of 6 standard of care (SOC) chemotherapy regimens for the treatment of advanced colorectal carcinoma. The primary study hypothesis is that pembrolizumab will prolong progression-free survival (PFS) or overall survival (OS) compared to current SOC chemotherapy.

    at UCLA

Our lead scientists for Microsatellite Instability research studies include .

Last updated: