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Mood Disorders clinical trials at University of California Health

4 in progress, 2 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • MBCT and CBT for Youth at High Risk for Mood and Psychotic Disorders: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    open to eligible people ages 9-25

    The present study is a randomized controlled trial comparing the efficacy and acceptability of CBT and MBCT group-based interventions adapted for young people at elevated risk for mood or psychotic disorder onset or relapse. Young people (ages 13-24) are provided with targeted psychoeducation and learn a variety of coping skills and wellness practices for mood regulation and stress and distress management. Parents meet separately to learn the same skills and receive guidance in supporting their youth with skill development. The therapy is also augmented by a mobile phone application that supports regular symptom monitoring and skills practice.

    at UCLA

  • Mobile-enhanced Group CBT for Adolescents at Risk Severe Mood Disorders

    open to eligible people ages 13-17

    Although cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) has shown efficacy in reducing symptoms and rates of mood relapse in adolescents at high risk for severe mood disorders (SMD; i.e., bipolar I/II disorder and recurrent or unremitting major depression), a significant limitation to the CBT's efficacy is the low rate of participant adherence to the prescribed between-session homework tasks. Mobile health applications have the potential to improve adherence to and acceptance of treatment through embedded treatment content, skill-practice, thought and symptom monitoring, all of which are facilitated by reward contingencies and notifications. This study examines whether a mobile application-enhanced CBT can improve participant adherence and treatment acceptance for adolescents at high risk for SMD.

    at UCLA

  • Mobile Virtual Positive Experiences for Anhedonia

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    Anhedonia is a symptom dimension that characterizes many individuals suffering from depression, as well as some types of anxiety, psychosis, and substance use. For the most part, treatments are effective in decreasing negative affect but ineffective in improving anhedonia, with some antidepressant medications even worsening symptoms of anhedonia. Yet anhedonia is a significant marker of poor prognosis as well as suicidal ideation and actual suicide. The development of effective treatments for anhedonia is thus of paramount importance. Advances in neuroscience indicate specific targets that may underlie anhedonia that can be shifted through behavioral training. The investigators have developed such a program and found it to be effective in raising positive affect, especially for depressed or anxious individuals with anhedonia at baseline. To date, this program has been implemented by highly trained clinicians, which have supervised its implementation on a large scale. Moreover, the behavior program is dependent on readily available rewarding experiences, which anhedonia obviously challenges. Furthermore, mechanistic evaluation is impeded by intra¬- and inter-¬individual variability in exposure to rewarding stimuli. Virtual Reality (VR) offsets these barriers by repeated controlled immersion in experiences designed to enhance approach motivation, initial responsiveness to reward attainment, and reward learning. In this current study, the investigators aim to measure clinical outcomes using Virtual Reality-Reward Training (VR-RT).

    at UCLA

  • Technology Enhanced Family Treatment

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The investigators propose to enhance the scalability of family-focused therapy (FFT), a 12-session evidence-based therapy for youth at high risk for mood disorders, through augmentation with a novel mobile phone application called MyCoachConnect (MCC). In adolescents with mood instability who have a parent with bipolar or major depressive disorder, clinicians in community clinics will conduct FFT sessions (consisting of psychoeducation and family skills training) supplemented by weekly MCC "real time" assessments of moods and family relationships; based on results of these assessments and the family's progress in treatment, clinicians will then push personalized informational and coaching alerts regarding the practice of communication and problem-solving skills. The investigators hypothesize that the augmented version of FFT (FFT-MCC) will be more effective than FFT without coaching/informational alerts in altering treatment targets and in stabilizing youths' mood symptoms and quality of life.

    at UCLA

Our lead scientists for Mood Disorders research studies include .

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