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MRI clinical trials at University of California Health

12 in progress, 6 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Biologic Association Between Metabolic Magnetic Resonance-positron Emission Tomograph (MR-PET) and Tissue Measures of Glycolysis in Brain Tumors of Infiltrating Glioblastoma Cells

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this project is to validate a new combined MRI and PET imaging technique as a biomarker or measure of glycolysis in brain tumors. To accomplish this, the investigators propose obtaining image-guided measures of tissue pH and biopsied tissue in tumor areas selected for bulk resection surgery. Investigators will then correlate the imaging measurements with pH, RNA expression, protein expression, and bioenergetics measurements of key glycolytic enzymes.

    at UCLA

  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) With Hyperpolarized Pyruvate (13C) as Diagnostic Tool in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    open to eligible males ages 18 years and up

    This is a prospective imaging study evaluating the utility of baseline metabolic MR imaging as a diagnostic and response monitoring tool in patients with advanced prostate cancer. Preliminary pre-clinical and clinical data demonstrates the ability of HP C-13 pyruvate/metabolic MR imaging to detect high-grade prostate cancer, including cancer with neuroendocrine differentiation, as well as provide early evidence of metabolic response and resistance following application of systemic therapies for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer patients. In the proposed study, the investigators aim is to extend the initial clinical results and further develop HP C-13 MRI as an imaging modality in advanced prostate cancer.

    at UCSF

  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Improving Knowledge of Brain Tumor Biology in Patients With Resectable Glioblastoma

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This clinical trial uses a type of imaging scan called magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to study brain tumor biology in patients with glioblastoma that can be removed by surgery (resectable). Malignant gliomas are the second leading cause of cancer mortality in people under the age of 35 in the United States. Glioblastoma is a type of malignant glioma with very poor patient prognosis. There are currently only about 3 drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of glioblastoma, one of them being administration of bevacizumab, which is very expensive. It is the most widely used treatment for glioblastoma with dramatic results. However, previous clinical trials have not demonstrated an overall survival benefit across all patient populations with glioblastoma that has returned after treatment (recurrent). The study aims to identify which patients who will benefit from bevacizumab therapy by observing MRI images and corresponding imaging biomarkers.

    at UCLA

  • Cancer Therapy Effects on the Heart

    open to eligible people ages 13-39

    Anthracycline chemotherapies (e.g. doxorubicin, daunorubicin) are commonly given to treat pediatric cancer, and carry a risk of cardiotoxicity. Over the long term, children who receive these therapies have an increased risk of heart failure and early cardiovascular death. However, current strategies for identifying patients who are at risk prior to the development of significant changes in heart function are limited. This study will focus on imaging markers of cardiac injury and dysfunction with the goal of developing improved diagnostic tests and treatment strategies.

    at UCSD

  • Hyperpolarized Pyruvate (13C) Magnetic Resonance Imaging In Patients With Fatty Liver Disease

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The recent development of dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technology for hyperpolarized (HP) 13C imaging offers a promising new avenue for non-invasively accessing fundamental metabolic changes associated with the progression of fatty liver disease in vivo. The purpose of this pilot study is to optimize sequence parameters for hyperpolarized 13C acquisition in the human liver and determine which metabolic changes can be seen in humans with simple, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) when compared to healthy volunteers.

    at UCSF

  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a single-center, prospective pilot study evaluating feasibility and efficacy of incorporating magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) simulation into the planning of radiation treatment (RT) for breast cancer.

    at UCSF

  • How Well Gadoquatrane Works and Its Safety With an Already Available Contrast Agent for MRI in People With Any Known or Suspected Problems of the Body (Except Brain or Spinal Cord-related Problems)

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    Researchers are looking for a better way to help people with any known or suspected problems (except brain or spinal cord-related problems) scheduled for a "contrast-enhanced" Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). MRI is used by doctors to create detailed images of the inside of the body to identify health problems. Sometimes doctors need to inject contrast agent into a patient's vein to perform a so called "contrast-enhanced" MRI (CE-MRI). Such CE-MRI examinations may support doctors to identify certain health problems or improve the evaluation. The contrast agents commonly used in MRI are gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs). GBCAs contain a "rare earth" element called gadolinium (Gd). Gadoquatrane is a new contrast agent under development with a lower amount of Gd needed per CE-MRI. The main purpose of this study is to learn whether CE-MRI scans with gadoquatrane work better than MRI scans without the use of a contrast agent (GBCA). The researchers will compare the ability to detect known or suspected problems (except brain or spinal cord-related problems) with gadoquatrane-MRI scans to plain-MRI scans without the use of a contrast agent. The participants will undergo 2 MRI scans, one with gadoquatrane and one with currently used GBCA. Both contrast agents will be injected into the vein. Each participant will be in the study for between 6 and 42 days with up to 7 doctor visits. At the start or during the study, the doctors and their study team will: - take blood and urine samples - do physical examinations - check blood pressure and heart rate - review the MRI scans obtained in the study and decide on the diagnosis - ask the participants questions about how they are feeling and what adverse events they are having. An adverse event is any medical problem that a participant has during a study. Doctors keep track of all adverse events, irrespective if they think it is related or not to the study treatments.

    at UC Irvine

  • How Well Gadoquatrane Works and Its Safety With an Already Available Contrast Agent for MRI in People With Known or Suspected Brain or Spinal Cord-related Problems

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    Researchers are looking for a better way to help people with known or suspected brain or spinal cord-related problems scheduled for a "contrast-enhanced" Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). MRI is used by doctors to create detailed images of the inside of the body to identify health problems. Sometimes doctors need to inject a contrast agent into a patient's vein to perform a so called "contrast-enhanced" MRI (CE-MRI). Such CE-MRI examinations may support doctors to identify certain health problems or improve the evaluation. The contrast agents commonly used in MRI are gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs). GBCAs contain a "rare earth" element called gadolinium (Gd). Gadoquatrane is a new contrast agent under development with a lower amount of Gd needed per CE-MRI. The main purpose of this study is to learn whether CE-MRI scans with gadoquatrane work better than MRI scans without the use of a contrast agent (GBCA). The researchers will compare the ability to detect brain and spinal cord-related problems in gadoquatrane-MRI scans to plain-MRI scans without the use of a contrast agent. The participants will undergo 2 MRI scans, one with gadoquatrane and one with currently used GBCA. Both contrast agents will be injected into the vein. Each participant will be in the study for between 6 and 42 days with up to 7 doctor visits. At the start or during the study, the doctors and their study team will: - take blood and urine samples - do physical examinations - check blood pressure and heart rate - review the MRI scans obtained in the study and decide on the diagnosis - ask the participants questions about how they are feeling and what adverse events they are having. An adverse event is any medical problem that a participant has during a study. Doctors keep track of all adverse events, irrespective if they think it is related or not to the study treatments.

    at UC Irvine

  • Hyperpolarized (HP) 13C Pyruvate Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for Response Monitoring to Neoadjuvant Abiraterone

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This study will evaluate the use of hyperpolarized 13C MRI (HP 13C MRI) and the HP-derived 13C pyruvate-to-lactate conversion rate constant (kPL) as an early response biomarker in men with treatment-naïve, high-risk, localized or locally advanced prostate cancer receiving neoadjuvant therapy.

    at UCSF

  • Stereotactic MRI-guided On-table Adaptive Radiation Therapy (SMART) for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    High-dose magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided hypofractionated radiation therapy delivered using daily adaptive dose planning has been shown in a retrospective study to result in improved overall survival, relative to patients receiving lower radiation doses, in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer, without increasing the rate of serious gastrointestinal toxicity. The goal of the proposed trial is to investigative in a controlled, prospective manner the robustness of this outcome, and to track quality of life over a 5-year trial period.

    at UCLA

  • 4 Repeat Tauopathy Neuroimaging Initiative

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate several different tests, including brain imaging, eye movement testing, body fluid samples, measurements of memory and other thinking abilities, and measures of functional independence in the hope that this information can be used to guide diagnosis and treatment of PSP and CBD in the future. Recent advances in our understanding of the biological causes of these diseases offer hope for new treatments. As such treatments are developed, sensitive and specific biological measurements (biomarkers) will be needed to provide precise and direct measures of the state of the brain, which will improve the statistical power of clinical trials. Brain imaging with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has previously been used to measure disease-related changes in the brain. The goal of this study is to identify the best methods of analysis (including eye movements, imaging, and behavioral measures) for tracking PSP and CBD over time. In addition, certain biomarkers in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid might also be useful for following these diseases over time. This study will examine the value of blood and CSF biomarkers relative to brain imaging and functional measures.

    at UCSF

  • CT-guided Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and MRI-guided Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer, MIRAGE Study

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase III trial studies compares CT-guided stereotactic body radiation therapy and MRI-guided stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in treating prostate cancer. Image-guided SBRT is a standard treatment for prostate cancer, which combines imaging of the cancer within the body with the delivery of therapeutic radiation doses produced on a linear accelerator machine. Imaging modalities for image-guided SBRT can be either computed tomography imaging (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or a combination of the two. This research is being done to help determine whether there are benefits to MRI-guidance over CT-guidance in patients who are receiving the same radiation dose by SBRT to treat prostate cancer.

    at UCLA

Our lead scientists for MRI research studies include .

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