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Opioid Use clinical trials at University of California Health

29 in progress, 16 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • "Bupe by the Book": A Tele-Buprenorphine Clinical Trial in Public Libraries With Unstably Housed Persons With Opioid Use Disorder

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Public libraries nationwide are facing an on-premise opioid overdose crisis. Many persons with opioid use disorder (OUD) remained unhoused and profoundly hard to reach. This study innovatively develops and tests a telemedicine intervention delivered through public libraries to increase unstably housed individuals' access to bupe treatment that would prevent overdoses from occurring in the first place. The investigators will conduct a 12-week pilot 2-arm randomized controlled trial (RCT) (n=40). Research staff will recruit library patrons and randomize them to weekly telehealth at the library or in-person clinic control arms across two participating libraries in San Diego.

    at UCSD

  • Comparing Oral Buprenorphine and Injectable Buprenorphine for the Treatment of Opioid Use Disorder

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    VA-BRAVE will determine whether a 28-day long-acting injectable sub-cutaneous (in the belly area) formulation of buprenorphine at a target dose of 300mg is superior in retaining Veterans in opioid treatment and in sustaining opioid abstinence compared to the daily sublingual (under the tongue) buprenorphine formulation at a target dose of 16-32 mg (standard of care). This is an open-label, randomized, controlled trial including 952 Veterans with opioid use disorder (OUD) recruited over 3 years and followed actively for 52 weeks. There are a number of secondary objectives that will be studied as well and include: comorbid substance use, both non-fatal and fatal opioid overdose, HIV and Hepatitis B (HBV) and C (HCV) testing results and risk behaviors, incarceration, quality of life, psychiatric symptoms of depression and posttraumatic stress disorder, housing status, dental health and utilization, and cost-effectiveness.

    at UCSF

  • Gabapentin to Reduce Opioid Use Postoperatively (GROUP) in Children

    open to eligible people ages up to 17 years

    The primary objective of this study is to determine if the peri and post operative use of gabapentin in children reduces the need for narcotics after thoracic surgery. We hypothesize that patients who are given gabapentin will need fewer morphine equivalents postoperatively than those who were not given gabapentin

    at UC Davis

  • Adapting the HOPE Online Support Intervention to Increase Uptake of Medications for Opioid Use Disorder

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    In a randomized controlled trial, with 3, 6-month and 1-year follow-up, this application aims to explore whether and how the HOPE intervention can be adapted to increase MOUD uptake among OUD patients, assess the effectiveness of using HOPE to increase MOUD requests, and analyze online community data to improve future intervention implementation and sustainability.

    at UC Irvine

  • ENDOblock: Bilateral Superficial Cervical Blocks With Local Wound Infiltration in Thyroid Surgery

    open to eligible people ages 18-99

    This is a single center, prospective, double-blinded randomized controlled trial comparing the efficacy of bilateral superficial cervical plexus blocks (BSCPB) with local wound infiltration vs placebo with local wound infiltration in reducing thyroid surgery postoperative pain. Primary outcomes assessed are post operative pain, quality of life/recovery, post operative nausea/vomiting and opioid use.

    at UC Davis

  • Improving Equitable Access to Naloxone to Prevent Opioid Overdose Deaths Within Syringe Service Programs (SAIA-Naloxone)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The goal of this clinical trial is to compare the effectiveness of a multi-faceted implementation strategy, the Systems Analysis and Improvement Approach for Naloxone (SAIA-N), in syringe service programs (SSPs). The main questions it aims to answer are: - Does SAIA-N improve naloxone distribution (number of doses, number of people receiving naloxone) compared to implementation as usual (IAU)? - Does SAIA-N improve equitable naloxone distribution (number of doses to Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) and other sub-groups, number of BIPOC and other sub-groups receiving naloxone) compared to IAU? - What are the costs associated with SAIA-N and how cost-effective is the strategy? SSPs randomized to the SAIA-N arm will participate in the strategy for a period of 12-months during which they will meet 1-2 times each month with a SAIA coach who will assist the SSP in optimizing their naloxone distribution. Researchers will compare SAIA-N to IAU to see if naloxone distribution, equitable naloxone distribution, and costs and cost-effectiveness differ by group.

    at UCSD

  • Managing Opioid Related Sleep Apnea With Acetazolamide

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Patients with chronic pain who use opioids appear to be at increased risk for breathing issues during sleep, termed sleep disordered breathing (SDB). Treatment of SDB often consists of use of a device during sleep that provides continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) via a mask interface. However, this device is not effective or tolerated in all individuals. The goal of this study is to examine whether a medication called acetazolamide can improve SDB, as an alternative to CPAP treatment. The investigators will measure the improvement in SDB, as well as any change in symptoms, during a 1 week treatment with acetazolamide compared with 1 week of placebo (sugar pill). This study will help to provide data for longer term studies of treatment for SDB in patients who use opioids.

    at UCSD

  • Opioid Approach Bias Modification

    open to eligible people ages 18-69

    To investigate the neurobiological mechanisms underlying opioid approach bias during a pilot RCT of opioid approach bias modification. The investigators are combining novel ultra-high field MRI technology with the promising treatment of modifying cognitive bias away from detrimental prescription drug use will generate novel neural data and potentially yield a new therapeutic tool to reduce problematic opioid use.

    at UCSF

  • Pain and Opioids: Integrated Treatment In Veterans

    open to eligible people ages 21-75

    This trial will recruit veterans with chronic pain (N = 160) who are prescribed buprenorphine for the treatment of opioid use disorder (OUD). We seek to: (1) examine the efficacy of an integrated treatment to reduce pain interference and substance misuse (Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Mindfulness-Based Relapse Prevention [ACT + MBRP]) compared to an education control (EC) consisting of a protocol-based series of education sessions concerning chronic pain, opioids, and buprenorphine use and (2) examine how theoretically-relevant treatment mechanisms of pain acceptance, engagement in values-based action, and opioid craving are related to treatment outcomes. Interventions will be delivered via the VA Video Connect telehealth modality.

    at UCSF

  • Patient Decision Aid for Opioid Use Disorder

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The aim of the study is to test the effectiveness of the Patient Decision Aid for Opioid Use Disorder (PtDA-MAT) by conducting a stepped-wedge cluster-randomized trial in CA H&SS (stratified by rural vs. non-rural areas) for adults with OUD. Patient outcomes will be tracked by (1) personal assessments (baseline, 3 months, and 6 months): drug use, overdose, healthcare utilization, and (2) clinical and administrative records (over approximately 24 months): drug treatment status and retention, physical and mental health diagnoses, arrest, incarceration, controlled substance use, and mortality. Multilevel models will be applied to test the intervention effects, controlling for possible temporal trends.

    at UCLA

  • Postoperative Opt-In Narcotics Treatment in Breast

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    In a recent study, researchers let patients choose what medications to go home with after endocrine surgery. This has not been done in outpatient breast surgery, though several institutions have moved towards avoiding opioids altogether after breast surgery. These institutions only prescribed rescue opioids upon request. The aim of this study is to compare a similar "opt-in" protocol for narcotics to usual care (where patients are routinely discharged with opioids) for outpatient breast surgery. This study will be designed as a randomized, controlled trial. When adult patients consent for outpatient breast surgery, the patients will be asked to participate in the study. Patients who are currently using narcotics would be excluded. The investigators would then randomize participants to the "opt-in" protocol versus being provided with a standard opioid prescription after surgery. Patients in the opt-in protocol will be recommended a pain treatment regimen with over-the-counter medications, acetaminophen or ibuprofen. These patients will be reassured that if their pain is uncontrolled after discharge, a narcotic prescription will be called in to their pharmacy if requested. The investigators will assess patient pain scores and medication use in the recovery area using the electronic medical record. The investigators will collect data on patient pain scores and medication use after discharge on a daily basis via phone call or electronically transmitted survey. The investigators will also evaluate patients at the time of their follow-up visits. Any patient phone calls will be routed to study personnel who will fill narcotic prescription requests if requested. Finally, among patients who do receive an opioid prescription, the investigators will track their opioid consumption.

    at UCLA

  • CPAP for SDB in Patients Who Use Opioids

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Patients with chronic pain who use opioids appear to be at increased risk for breathing issues during sleep, termed sleep disordered breathing (SDB). Treatment of SDB often consists of use of a device during sleep that provides continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) via a mask interface. The goal of this study is to determine whether patients with chronic pain who use opioids and have SDB might benefit from the use of CPAP in terms of sleep quality, pain, quality of life, and other measures. In addition, the study will examine whether these individuals are able to adhere to CPAP, which will be important for future studies. Lastly, we anticipate that CPAP won't work for everyone due to the changes that opioids can cause in breathing patterns. We will examine how often CPAP is ineffective, and whether we can predict which individuals are least likely to resolve their SDB with CPAP.

    at UCSD

  • Pupillary Unrest as an Indicator of Central Opioid Effect in Subjects 40-60 Years of Age

    open to eligible people ages 40-60

    This study will establish the relationship between magnitude of opioid exposure and a pupillary measure referred to as PUAL (pupillary unrest in ambient light), in subjects aged 40-60. Previous investigation demonstrated that loss of PUAL was a sensitive, discriminative indicator of opioid toxicity and respiratory depression among subjects aged 20-40 years old. Population data indicate that pupil size and PUAL decline slightly with age. The investigators will explore whether PUAL proves to be a sensitive indicator of opioid exposure and respiratory depression in this older group.

    at UCSF

  • Predicting Chronic Opioid Use Following Lower Extremity Joint Arthroplasty

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Personalized medicine is a concept in which medical care is individualized to a patient based on their unique characteristics, including comorbidities, demographics, genetics, and microbiome. After major surgery, some patients are at increased risk of opioid dependence. By identifying unique genetic and microbiome markers, clinicians may potentially identify individual risk factors for opioid dependence. By identifying these high risk patients early-on, personalized interventions may be applied to these patients in order to reduce the incidence of opioid-dependence.

    at UCSD

  • Predicting Chronic Pain Following Breast Surgery

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Breast surgery, which includes mastectomy, breast reconstructive surgery, or lumpectomies with sentinel node biopsies, may lead to the development of chronic pain and long-term opioid use. In the era of an opioid crisis, it is important to risk-stratify this surgical population for risk of these outcomes in an effort to personalize pain management. The opioid epidemic in the United States resulted in more than 40,000 deaths in 2016, 40% of which involved prescription opioids. Furthermore, it is estimated that 2 million patients become opioid-dependent after elective, outpatient surgery each year. After major breast surgery, chronic pain has been reported to develop anywhere between 35% - 62% of patients, while about 10% use long-term opioids. Precision medicine is a concept at which medical management is tailored to an individual patient based on a specific patient's characteristics, including social, demographic, medical, genetic, and molecular/cellular data. With a plethora of data specific to millions of patients, the use of artificial intelligence (AI) modalities to analyze big data in order to implement precision medicine is crucial. We propose to prospectively collect rich data from patients undergoing various breast surgeries in order to develop predictive models using AI modalities to predict patients at-risk for chronic pain and opioid use.

    at UCSD

  • Association of Microbiome Patterns With Chronic Opioid Use

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The United States is in the midst of an opioid epidemic, with the number of opioid-related deaths having risen six-fold since 1999. Chronic pain imposes a tremendous economic burden of up to US$635 billion per year in terms of direct costs (such as the costs of treatment) and indirect costs (such as lost productivity and time away from work). We need to better understand individual characteristics that may put patients at risk for chronic opioid use. Recently, the relationship between gut microbiome and diseases of the central and peripheral nervous systems has received increasing attention. New evidence suggests that gut microbiota may also play a critical role in many types of chronic pain, including inflammatory pain, neuropathic pain, and opioid tolerance. Many signaling molecules derived from gut microbiota, such as pathogen-associated molecular patterns, metabolites, and neurotransmitters, act on receptors that regulate the peripheral and central sensitization, which in turn mediate the development of chronic pain. Gut microbiota-derived mediators serve as critical modulators for the induction of peripheral sensitization, directly or indirectly regulating the excitability of primary nociceptive neurons. Given the strong evidence supporting gut microbiome's involvement in pain pathways, there is a need to develop studies that characterize the differences in gut microbiome between chronic pain patients requiring opioids versus healthy controls. The objective of this proposal is to perform a pilot study measuring the predictive ability of the gut microbiome with chronic opioid use - this will then lay the groundwork to adequately power a larger funded prospective study.

    at UCSD

  • Collaboration Leading to Addiction Treatment and Recovery From Other Stresses

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Collaboration Leading to Addiction Treatment and Recovery from Other Stresses (CLARO) is a five-year project that tests whether delivering care using a collaborative model helps patients with both opioid use disorders and mental health disorders.

    at UCLA

  • Competitive Revision for CLARO: Collaboration Leading to Addiction Treatment and Recovery From Other Stresses

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to develop and then test an enhanced version of the parent study's collaborative care intervention for co-occurring disorders (CC-COD) to reduce the risk of suicide and overdose among individuals with opioid use disorder (OUD) in combination with PTSD/depression. The parent study is CLARO, Collaboration Leading to Addiction Treatment and Recovery from Other Stresses (NCT04559893).

    at UCLA

  • CBT-based mHealth Intervention Targeting MOUD Retention, Adherence, and Opioid Use

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    The focus of this study is to examine the effectiveness of imFREE relative to mHealth ED in facilitating treatment retention and adherence and reducing opioid use among adults with OUD initiating BUP treatment. There are two specific aims: (1) to test the effectiveness of imFREE, delivered in conjunction with medical management with buprenorphine (imFREE + MM), relative to mHealth ED + MM, in facilitating buprenorphine treatment retention and adherence in a population of individuals with OUD initiating MM (N=200). (2) To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of imFREE.

    at UCLA UCSD

  • Pediatric Emergency Department-Initiated Treatment for Adolescents With Opioid Use Disorder

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    ED-initiated buprenorphine with brief intervention and facilitated referral to treatment has been shown to be highly successful in increasing treatment engagement rates and reducing opioid use among adults. It is unknown whether this intervention is similarly effective for adolescents with OUD. To rigorously examine this important clinical research question, it is first necessary to optimize this intervention for the adolescent population. In this R34 proposal, we will use the Assessment-Decision-Administration-Production-Topic Experts-Integration-Training-Testing (ADAPT-ITT) framework-a systematic method for intervention adaptation- to adapt (Aim 1) and test the feasibility (Aim 2) of a treatment strategy for adolescents that has been shown to effectively link adults with OUD to ongoing addiction treatment.

    at UC Davis

  • High Dose Buprenorphine (BUP) Induction in the Emergency Department (ED)

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This project, involving two distinct clinical trials, tests whether induction to a higher than currently recommended buprenorphine (BUP) induction dose is safe and can improve the proportion of patients who engage in comprehensive addiction services within 7-day of induction. Trial 1 is a head-to-head comparison of the safety, tolerability and feasibility of high dose BUP induction (32 mg). The study involves two cohorts, (1) a 12mg cohort (standard) to determine baseline data and (2) a 32 mg (high dose) cohort. If the 32mg is intolerable, a 24 mg dose may be evaluated. Trial 2 is a small pilot multicenter randomized, double blinded, clinical trial in 80 participants (randomized 1:1) that will provide preliminary information on efficacy with the primary outcome being engagement in comprehensive addiction treatment 7-days post BUP induction. In collaboration with National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), the research team have determined that there must be a minimum increase in engagement in comprehensive addiction treatment of 15% at 7-days in the high dose induction group to justify a larger future clinical trial.

    at UCLA

  • Improving Postamputation Functioning by Decreasing Phantom Pain With Perioperative Continuous Peripheral Nerve Blocks: A Department of Defense Funded Multicenter Study

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    When a limb is amputated, pain perceived in the part of the body that no longer exists often develops, called "phantom limb" pain. The exact reason that phantom limb pain occurs is unclear, but when a nerve is cut-as happens with an amputation-changes occur in the brain and spinal cord that are associated with persistent pain. The negative feedback-loop between the injured limb and the brain can be stopped by putting local anesthetic-called a "nerve block"-on the injured nerve, effectively keeping any "bad signals" from reaching the brain. A "continuous peripheral nerve block" (CPNB) is a technique providing pain relief that involves inserting a tiny tube-smaller than a piece of spaghetti-through the skin and next to the target nerve. Local anesthetic is then introduced through the tiny tube, which bathes the nerve in the numbing medicine. This provides a multiple-day block that provides opioid-free pain control with no systemic side effects, and may prevent the destructive feedback loop that results in phantom limb pain following an amputation. We propose a multicenter, randomized, triple-masked (investigators, subjects, statisticians), placebo-controlled, parallel arm, human-subjects clinical trial to determine if a prolonged, high-concentration (dense), perioperative CPNB improves post-amputation physical and emotional functioning while decreasing opioid consumption, primarily by preventing chronic phantom limb pain.

    at UCSD

  • INTEGRA: A Vanguard Study of Health Service Delivery in a Mobile Health Delivery Unit

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    The purpose of this study is to determine the efficacy of using a mobile health delivery unit ("mobile unit") to deliver "one stop" integrated health services - particularly medication for opioid use disorder (MOUD) and medication for HIV treatment and prevention - to people who inject drugs (PWID) with opioid use disorder (OUD) to improve uptake and use of MOUD, and uptake and use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) or pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP).

    at UCLA

  • Naloxone for Opioid Associated Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The investigator's long-term goal is to conduct Naloxone for Opioid Associated out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest (NOPACA), a randomized, double blind, controlled trial to determine the efficacy of naloxone vs. placebo in Opioid Associated out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest. The investigative team plan to randomize patients in OHCA to early naloxone administration vs. placebo after initial resuscitation and measure ROSC and survival. Challenges to designing NOPACA include uncertainty regarding: 1) the available pool of participants and number of EMS agencies needed to meet enrollment targets; 2) acceptability among patients, EMS and Emergency Medicine provider stakeholders, and 3) estimates of the study outcomes needed for sample size estimates. Toward obtaining the necessary information to design NOPACA, the investigators propose a pilot RCT of participants at high risk for OA-OHCA to verify a reasonable recruitment rate; treatment fidelity and acceptability; and adequate retention and measurement of outcomes at follow up. The investigators propose incorporating hypothesis testing of the feasibility outcomes to determine progression to a definitive trial.

    at UCSF

  • Office-based Methadone Versus Buprenorphine to Address Retention in Medication for Opioid Use Disorder Treatment.

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The purpose of this clinical trial is to compare the effectiveness of office-based methadone with pharmacy administration and/or dispensing to office-based buprenorphine for the treatment of opioid use disorder. This study will also examine factors influencing the implementation of office-based methadone.

    at UCSF

  • Postoperative Nudges to Reduce Opioid Prescribing

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study tests the effectiveness of two email-based behavioral nudges, one based on peer behavior and one based on best practice guidelines, in reducing excessive opioid prescriptions after surgery. It will be conducted in three surgical specialties (general surgery, orthopedic surgery, and obstetric/gynecological surgery) at 19 hospitals within one healthcare system. These specialties will each be randomized to a control group or one of two nudge groups. Each month for one year, surgeons in the nudge groups will receive emails comparing their opioid prescribing either to their peers' prescribing or to prescribing guidelines. Both types of email-based nudges are expected to reduce opioid prescribing after surgery.

    at UCLA

  • TACUNA (Traditions and Connections for Urban Native Americans)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study responds to Request For Application-DA-19-035, HEAL (Helping End Addiction Long Term) initiative: Preventing OUD in Older Adolescents and Young Adults (ages 16-30) by developing and implementing a culturally centered intervention to address opioid use among urban AI/AN emerging adults in California. The primary goal of this study is to compare AI/AN emerging adults who receive TACUNA plus a Wellness Circle (WC) to those AI/AN emerging adults who receive an opioid education workshop on outcomes (e.g., opioid misuse and alcohol and other drug use) over a period of 12 months. TACUNA will be a motivational interviewing group intervention that incorporates traditional practices and discussion of how to cultivate healthy social networks and cultural worlds. The Wellness gathering will be for emerging adults and people in their social network, and will focus on how social networks and cultural connectedness influence healthy behaviors. Opioid education will focus on discussion of opioid misuse within the AI/AN urban community and ways to reduce use in a culturally appropriate manner. Investigators expect those who receive TACUNA + WG will report less opioid and AOD (alcohol and other drug) use frequency, fewer consequences, less time spent around peers who use opioids and AOD, and less perceived prevalence of peer use compared to opioid education over a period of 12 months. Also, investigators will evaluate the intervention's effects on secondary outcomes of social networks and cultural connectedness. Survey data is collected at baseline, 3-months, 6-months and 12-months. Longitudinal analyses will compare intervention participant and control participants on primary and secondary outcomes.

    at UCLA

  • Technology for MAT in Primary Care - Phase 2

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    With over 72,000 overdose deaths in 2017, of which 47,600 are attributable to opioid overdose, the opioid epidemic has become North America's most widespread behavioral public health problem. Medication-assisted treatment (MAT) for opioid use disorder (OUD) is highly efficacious. The Opioid Addiction Recovery Support (OARS), comprised of a healthcare team portal connected to a patient mobile application, provides opioid-related education, promotes connectedness with clinicians, and tracks MAT treatment progress. This study will conduct interviews with patients that will inform optimal design of OARS, assess the efficacy of OARS in improving MAT outcomes in primary care settings, and evaluate the sustainability and return on investment. It joins an outstanding scientific team at University of California, Los Angeles and a small business that has developed, Opioid Addiction Recovery Support (OARS) -- a software platform that by integrating with the Electronic Health Record (EHR) improves clinical management of patients by primary care providers (PCPs) treating patients with OUD using MAT. OARS platform uses a dashboard to show the real-time measurement of patient achievements in recovery. It provides opportunities for patients to interact with their PCPs, allowing for better connection to and support from their PCPs. OARS platform features artificial intelligence to analyze information from the EHR and from patients to provide a relapse risk assessment for patients receiving MAT for OUD, an innovation that sets OARS apart from other software solutions. The goal of Phase 1 was to modify the OARS platform for use in primary care settings by conducting interviews with Primary Care Physicians (PCPs) (N=20) and their patients with OUD (N=40) in primary care settings to collect data on feasibility and acceptability of engaging with OARS to inform the user-centered design of OARS. The goals of Phase 2 of this study are to: (1) to assess the effectiveness of OARS in improving opioid agonist treatment outcomes across 6 treatment programs (N=200 treated patients) and (2) evaluate the sustainability and return on investment of OARS implementation across 6 treatment programs. A commercialization plan documents progress to date for the OARS platform and presents a market plan to improve both the scale and quality of MAT services delivered by PCPs in primary care, which is a major contribution to addressing the ongoing opioid epidemic.

    at UCLA

  • Emergency Medicine Peer Outreach Worker Engagement for Recovery

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This is an observational, prospective case-control study evaluating the effects of an emergency department community health worker-peer recovery specialist program (PCHW), the Substance Misuse Assistance Response Team (SMART). Aims of this study are to 1) understand participant experiences working with a SMART PCHW and identify possible mechanisms for successful recovery linkage; 2) Evaluate SMART effectiveness on patient-centered outcomes, building recovery capital, and recovery linkage; 3) Evaluate SMART implementation and effectiveness on patient outcomes over time. Using a combination of surveys and data linkages to state administrative databases, study investigators will prospectively compare changes in addiction treatment engagement, recovery capital, health related social needs, acute care utilization, and death between people receiving a ED PCHW and those who do not. After consenting to study participation, participants will complete surveys at time of study enrollment and 3 and 6 months after their initial ED visit. Primary outcomes include engagement in addiction treatment, social services engagement, acute care utilization, and mortality will be assessed through linkages to state administrative databases.

    at UCLA

Our lead scientists for Opioid Use research studies include .

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