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Opioid Use clinical trials at University of California Health

17 in progress, 10 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Study Comparing Oral Buprenorphine and Injectable Buprenorphine for the Treatment of Opioid Use Disorder

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    VA-BRAVE will determine whether a 28-day long-acting injectable sub-cutaneous (in the belly area) formulation of buprenorphine at a target dose of 300mg is superior in retaining Veterans in opioid treatment and in sustaining opioid abstinence compared to the daily sublingual (under the tongue) buprenorphine formulation at a target dose of 16-24 mg (standard of care). This is an open-label, randomized, controlled trial including 900 Veterans with opioid use disorder (OUD) recruited over 3 years and followed actively for 52 weeks. There are a number of secondary objectives that will be studied as well and include: comorbid substance use, both non-fatal and fatal opioid overdose, HIV and Hepatitis C (HCV) testing results and risk behaviors, incarceration, quality of life, psychiatric symptoms of depression and posttraumatic stress disorder, housing status, and cost-effectiveness.

    at UCSF

  • A Study of Gabapentin to Reduce Opioid Use After Surgery in Children (The GROUP Study)

    open to eligible people ages up to 17 years

    The primary objective of this study is to determine if the peri and post operative use of gabapentin in children reduces the need for narcotics after thoracic surgery. We hypothesize that patients who are given gabapentin will need fewer morphine equivalents postoperatively than those who were not given gabapentin

    at UC Davis

  • A Study of Opioid Use in Shoulder Arthroplasty Patients

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The investigators aim to better understand opioid use in patients undergoing elective shoulder surgery. The investigators will prospectively determine actual postoperative opioid use, while evaluating whether implementation of an educational session with pain contract would help minimize opioid use.

    at UC Davis

  • Acute Pain Management in Patients on Opioid Replacement Therapy

    open to eligible people ages 18-60

    This is an outpatient randomized within subject placebo-controlled human laboratory investigation of analgesia (as assessed with quantitative sensory testing; QST) from ketamine alone and in combination with hydromorphone in buprenorphine maintained participants. The goals of this project are to characterize the analgesic, subjective, and physiologic effects of ketamine combined with hydromorphone in patients on buprenorphine maintenance for opioid use disorder.

    at UCSF

  • Adapting the HOPE Online Support Intervention to Increase Uptake of Medications for Opioid Use Disorder

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    In a randomized controlled trial, with 3, 6-month and 1-year follow-up, this application aims to explore whether and how the HOPE intervention can be adapted to increase MOUD uptake among OUD patients, assess the effectiveness of using HOPE to increase MOUD requests, and analyze online community data to improve future intervention implementation and sustainability.

    at UC Irvine

  • Empower Opioid Misuse & Chronic Pain

    open to eligible people ages 18-75

    This study evaluates the effects of peripheral nerve stimulation on opioid craving and use and pain in participants with chronic non-cancer pain (NCP) and opioid misuse. Participants will be randomized to receive the active or sham control treatment for the duration of the study.

    at UCSF

  • Opioid Approach Bias Modification

    open to eligible people ages 18-69

    To investigate the neurobiological mechanisms underlying opioid approach bias during a pilot RCT of opioid approach bias modification. The investigators are combining novel ultra-high field MRI technology with the promising treatment of modifying cognitive bias away from detrimental prescription drug use will generate novel neural data and potentially yield a new therapeutic tool to reduce problematic opioid use.

    at UCSF

  • Patient Decision Aid for Opioid Use Disorder

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The aim of the study is to test the effectiveness of the Patient Decision Aid for Opioid Use Disorder (PtDA-MAT) by conducting a stepped-wedge cluster-randomized trial in CA H&SS (stratified by rural vs. non-rural areas) for adults with OUD. Patient outcomes will be tracked by (1) personal assessments (baseline, 3 months, and 6 months): drug use, overdose, healthcare utilization, and (2) clinical and administrative records (over approximately 24 months): drug treatment status and retention, physical and mental health diagnoses, arrest, incarceration, controlled substance use, and mortality. Multilevel models will be applied to test the intervention effects, controlling for possible temporal trends.

    at UCLA

  • TACUNA (Traditions and Connections for Urban Native Americans)

    open to eligible people ages 18-25

    This study responds to Request For Application-DA-19-035, HEAL (Helping End Addiction Long Term) initiative: Preventing OUD in Older Adolescents and Young Adults (ages 16-30) by developing and implementing a culturally centered intervention to address opioid use among urban AI/AN emerging adults in California. The primary goal of this study is to compare AI/AN emerging adults who receive TACUNA plus a Wellness Gathering (WG) to those AI/AN emerging adults who receive an opioid education workshop on outcomes (e.g., opioid misuse and alcohol and other drug use) over a period of 12 months. TACUNA will be a motivational interviewing group intervention that incorporates traditional practices and discussion of how to cultivate healthy social networks and cultural worlds. The Wellness gathering will be for emerging adults and people in their social network, and will focus on how social networks and cultural connectedness influence healthy behaviors. Opioid education will focus on discussion of opioid misuse within the AI/AN urban community and ways to reduce use in a culturally appropriate manner. Investigators expect those who receive TACUNA + WG will report less opioid and AOD (alcohol and other drug) use frequency, fewer consequences, less time spent around peers who use opioids and AOD, and less perceived prevalence of peer use compared to opioid education over a period of 12 months. Also, investigators will evaluate the intervention's effects on secondary outcomes of social networks and cultural connectedness. Survey data is collected at baseline, 3-months, 6-months and 12-months. Longitudinal analyses will compare intervention participant and control participants on primary and secondary outcomes.

    at UCLA

  • The Effect of Chronic Pain on Delay Discounting in Methadone Patients

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    The epidemic of opioid overdose deaths continues to rise, killing more persons in 2017 than HIV/AIDS at the height of that epidemic. Medication assisted treatment, including methadone and buprenorphine, is the standard of care for the treatment of opioid use disorder (OUD). However, chronic pain can reduce treatment efficacy during medication assisted treatment and is associated with illicit substance relapse, dropout, and subsequent overdose. Mechanisms by which chronic pain may influence the impulsive decision making (e.g., drug relapse) in persons with OUD have not been well characterized. A better understanding is needed of decision-making in this population. Two factors that can influence decisions to use drugs are impulsivity and acute opioid withdrawal. This proposal will test how chronic pain is associated with increases in impulsive decision making in OUD, whether impulsive decision making is greater when undergoing opioid withdrawal, and how catastrophizing may modify the association between withdrawal and impulsive decision making in patients with chronic pain and OUD. An ideal population for this developmental research project are methadone maintained patients, who show high treatment attendance rates and will therefore assure study efficiency and reliable completion.

    at UCSF

  • Cannabidiol as Adjunctive Treatment for Opioid Use Disorder

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This research aims to determine the effects and safety of cannabidiol (CBD) oral solution as an adjunctive therapy for patients, who have Opioid Use Disorder and are taking buprenorphine + naloxone. Buprenorphine + naloxone is an approved treatment for Opioid Use Disorder, but relapse to opioid misuse is common among patients who receive this treatment. Finding an adjunctive treatment that reduces relapse for these patients would be helpful. Investigators will recruit participants from the Domiciliary treatment center at the West Los Angeles VA Medical Center (DOM). They will be receiving buprenorphine + naloxone as part of residential therapy. Potential participants who pass initial screening and wish to continue in the study will provide written, informed consent and will complete a 2-day evaluation, including blood and urine tests, questionnaires about their mood, medical, psychiatric and drug use history and physical exam. Sixty participants who meet all eligibility criteria will be invited to complete baseline assessments (blood and urine tests, questionnaires), and will be assigned randomly to receive CBD or placebo in each of two cohorts, corresponding to two dose groups of 20 participants per cohort (CBD 700 , 1400 mg/day). Within each cohort, 20 participants will receive CBD and 10 will receive placebo. The cohorts will be studied in ascending dose order to ensure safety. After the baseline measurements, participants will travel to UCLA by taxi, accompanied by a research associate, every morning for 4 weeks (28 sessions). Each morning, he or she will take the study medication under supervision (CBD 700, 1400 mg or placebo). Questionnaires on opioid craving, withdrawal, and mood symptoms will be administered daily during the treatment period. After the 28-day intervention, participants will complete the questionnaires and undergo urine drug tests in 4 weekly follow-up visits. The study will last ~10 weeks, comprising three periods: a screening period (2-weeks when participants are stabilized on buprenorphine + naloxone in residential treatment at the DOM), a treatment period (4 weeks when study CBD or placebo is administered at UCLA), and a follow-up period (4 weeks after termination of the test intervention).

    at UCLA

  • Effectiveness of a CBT-based mHealth Intervention Targeting MOUD Retention, Adherence, and Opioid Use

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    The focus of this study is to examine the effectiveness of imFREE relative to mHealth ED in facilitating treatment retention and adherence and reducing opioid use among adults with OUD initiating BUP treatment. There are two specific aims: (1) to test the effectiveness of imFREE, delivered in conjunction with medical management with buprenorphine (imFREE + MM), relative to mHealth ED + MM, in facilitating buprenorphine treatment retention and adherence in a population of individuals with OUD initiating MM (N=200). (2) To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of imFREE.

    at UCLA UCSD

  • Feasibility of Pediatric Emergency Department-Initiated Treatment for Adolescents With Opioid Use Disorder

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    ED-initiated buprenorphine with brief intervention and facilitated referral to treatment has been shown to be highly successful in increasing treatment engagement rates and reducing opioid use among adults. It is unknown whether this intervention is similarly effective for adolescents with OUD. To rigorously examine this important clinical research question, it is first necessary to optimize this intervention for the adolescent population. In this R34 proposal, we will use the Assessment-Decision-Administration-Production-Topic Experts-Integration-Training-Testing (ADAPT-ITT) framework-a systematic method for intervention adaptation- to adapt (Aim 1) and test the feasibility (Aim 2) of a treatment strategy for adolescents that has been shown to effectively link adults with OUD to ongoing addiction treatment.

    at UC Davis

  • INTEGRA: A Vanguard Study of Health Service Delivery in a Mobile Health Delivery Unit

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    The purpose of this study is to determine the efficacy of using a mobile health delivery unit ("mobile unit") to deliver "one stop" integrated health services - particularly medication for opioid use disorder (MOUD) and medication for HIV treatment and prevention - to people who inject drugs (PWID) with opioid use disorder (OUD) to improve uptake and use of MOUD, and uptake and use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) or pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP).

    at UCLA

  • Medication Treatment for Opioid Use Disorder in Expectant Mothers: Infant Neurodevelopmental Outcomes Sub-study

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This is a sub-study of NIDA CTN Protocol 0080: Medication Treatment for Opioid Use Disorder in Expectant Mothers (MOMs; Unique protocol ID: 2019-0429-1). Caretakers of the infants delivered by MOMs participants will be offered the opportunity to enroll in this sub-study, which is designed to evaluate the impact of extended-release buprenorphine (BUP-XR), relative to sublingual buprenorphine (BUP-SL), on infant neurodevelopment. The additional data collected in this sub-study will be combined with data from the main MOMs trial.

    at UCSF

  • Prospective Randomized Trial of CPAP for SDB in Patients Who Use Opioids

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Patients with chronic pain who use opioids appear to be at increased risk for breathing issues during sleep, termed sleep disordered breathing (SDB). Treatment of SDB often consists of use of a device during sleep that provides continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) via a mask interface. The goal of this study is to determine whether patients with chronic pain who use opioids and have SDB might benefit from the use of CPAP in terms of sleep quality, pain, quality of life, and other measures. In addition, the study will examine whether these individuals are able to adhere to CPAP, which will be important for future studies. Lastly, we anticipate that CPAP won't work for everyone due to the changes that opioids can cause in breathing patterns. We will examine how often CPAP is ineffective, and whether we can predict which individuals are least likely to resolve their SDB with CPAP.

    at UCSD

  • The Effect of Pectoral Blocks on Perioperative Pain in Gender Affirmation Top Surgery

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    Despite recent advancements with regional and local anesthesia, postoperative pain continues to be a major concern for patients undergoing breast surgery. Opioids, often in combination with NSAIDS and/or gabapentioids, have been the main pharmacologic pain control strategy in the postoperative period. The pectoral nerve block is a regional anesthetic technique, which is effective at providing postoperative anesthesia in breast surgeries. However, this has only been studied in oncologic-related breast operations. It is our aim to study the effects of pectoral regional nerve blocks in patients undergoing breast reduction for gender affirmation. The overall goal is to establish an effective pain control regimen utilizing regional anesthetic techniques in this patient population. The specific objective of this proposal is to evaluate the effectiveness of these blocks on perioperative and postoperative analgesia. The hypothesis is that participants undergoing gender-affirmation breast surgery who receive a pectoral nerve block will have less perioperative and postoperative pain as well as reduced opioid consumption compared to those receiving a placebo. Participants who are undergoing gender affirmation breast reduction surgery will be randomized to either receive a preoperative nerve block or to receive a placebo. Intraoperative and postoperative opioid requirements will be compared in addition to post-operative pain scores. Participants will be asked to fill out a pain diary during their first week postoperatively. They will also be asked to document if, and when, narcotic pain medication was required for pain control. The two groups will be compared to determine if there was any difference in pain scores as well as narcotic medication requirements.

    at UCSF

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