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Osteogenesis Imperfecta clinical trials at UC Health
4 in progress, 3 open to new patients

  • BBD Longitudinal Study of Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    open to all eligible people

    Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) is a rare disorder that causes bones to break easily. People with OI may have broken bones with little or no trauma, dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI), and, in adult years, hearing loss. It is seen in both genders and all races. OI can range from very severe to very mild. Individuals with the most severe type of OI may die at birth. People with severe OI who survive may have bowed arms and legs, very short stature and be unable to walk. People with the mildest form of OI may only break bones occasionally and have normal height and lifespan. People with OI also often have problems with the spine. The spine problems include compression fractures and scoliosis (a curvature of the spine). DI is characterized by grey or brown teeth that may chip and wear down and break easily. Before the genetic cause of OI was known, OI was classified into four types. Each type was based upon the symptoms and severity of OI. In most people with OI, the cause is a change in one of the genes that makes a protein called type 1 collagen. In the past decade, it was discovered that in about 5% of people with OI it is in another gene. Some doctors now classify OI both on how severe it is as well as which gene is causing OI. Our research aims are: 1. Perform DNA testing and collect natural history data on all individuals enrolled in this longitudinal study. The genetic cause of the brittle bone disease will be compared with things like severity, various features and response to treatments. 2. We will see how often people with type I OI have vertebral compression fractures of the spine. We will do x-rays to see how often they get compression fractures of the vertebrae, what happens over time and any risk factors that increase the risk of these compression fractures. 3. We will follow people with all forms of OI to see how often they develop scoliosis (curvature of the spine). We will look at the effects of scoliosis on lung function, ability to walk and quality of life. We will also look at the effects of various treatments (bracing, surgery, etc.) on scoliosis and lung function. 4. We will look at dental health in people with OI. We will see how often people with OI have problems with teeth alignment. Importantly, we will see how dental health impacts a person's quality of life.

    at UCLA

  • Dental Malocclusion and Craniofacial Development in OI

    open to eligible people ages 10-100

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare inherited disorder that causes bones to break easily. Individuals with osteogenesis imperfecta break bones often and may have other problems, including hearing loss and pain and difficulty getting around. People with moderate to severe OI may also be diagnosed with dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI). DI is characterized by grey or brown teeth that may chip and wear down and break easily. People with DI may also have skull and neck defects. These patients may have severe teeth misalignment resulting in clinically significant chewing problems. Teeth misalignment in OI is very hard to treat because of the quality and quantity of bone. The overall goal of this study is to improve dental health to improve the quality of life of people with OI.

    at UCLA

  • Urinary Biomarkers of OI Pathobiology

    open to all eligible people

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare inherited disorder that causes bones to break easily. Individuals with osteogenesis imperfecta break bones often and may have other problems, including hearing loss, dental problems, pain and difficulty getting around. Before the genetic cause of OI was known, OI was classified into four types. Each type was based upon the symptoms and severity of OI. In most people with OI, the cause is a change in one of the genes that makes a protein called type 1 collagen. Some doctors now classify OI both on how severe it is as well as which gene is causing OI. When people classify OI this way, there are more than 10 types of OI. The current laboratory testing to determine OI subtype involves the collection of blood and/or skin cells.

    at UCLA

  • A Study in Adult Patients With Type I, III or IV Osteogenesis Imperfecta Treated With BPS804

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The purpose of this study is to select a suitable dose of BPS804 by measuring the strength/quality of bone using a special type of CT scanner. Participants will be treated for 12 months and followed up for a further 12 months.

    at UCSF

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