Skip to main content

Overactive Bladder clinical trials at University of California Health

5 in progress, 4 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Study of Oral vs Transdermal (through skin patch) Oxybutynin for Post-surgical Bladder Pain and Urgency in Children

    open to eligible people ages 4-8

    Bladder pain and urgency are common after bladder surgery. The objective is to determine if transdermal administration is superior to oral administration in alleviating pain and urgency.

    at UC Davis

  • BlueWind RENOVA iStim™ System for the Treatment of OAB

    open to eligible females ages 18-80

    The OASIS study is prospective, interventional, multi-center study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the BlueWind RENOVA iStim™ implantable tibial neuromodulation System for the treatment of patients diagnosed with overactive bladder.

    at UC Irvine

  • InterStim Micro Post Market Clinical Follow-up Study

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Post-market clinical follow-up for continued assessment of safety and performance to confirm long-term outcomes of the InterStim Micro System for sacral neuromodulation.

    at UCLA

  • Noninvasive Spinal Cord Stimulation for Neurogenic and Idiopathic Overactive Bladder

    open to eligible people ages 18-80

    Overactive bladder (OAB) affects 12-30% of the world's population. The accompanying urinary urgency, urinary frequency and incontinence can impair the ability to work, interact in social activities and can result in poor social functioning. Multiple treatment modalities are available for overactive bladder. However, each therapy has drawbacks that limit its application in certain patient populations. For example, oral medications have significant side effects and suffer from poor adherence. Botulinum toxin injection into the bladder wall is invasive, requires re-treatment on a regular basis and carries a risk of urinary retention. Current neuromodulatory techniques are invasive and require highly-specialized care. Therefore, a need exists for a non-invasive, well-tolerated and easily administered therapy for OAB. Transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation (TSCS) has been developed and tested in able bodied individuals to initiate locomotor function as well as in the SCI population for lower extremity and upper extremity function. More recently, we have tested this SCI patients to enable lower urinary tract function and decrease detrusor overactivity, resulting in improved continence.

    at UCLA

  • TEST-ON - Does iStim Reduce Urinary Urgency?

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a chronic disorder with an overall prevalence in the adult population of over 10%, but that may exceed 40% in elderly groups. Most overactive bladder treatments are aimed at decreasing urgency incontinence episodes. The purpose of this study is to determine whether an at-home transvaginal electrical stimulation (TES) program works to alleviate symptoms of urgency in patients with urinary urgency and frequency without incontinence. This is a cross-over trial. Women >18 yo presenting with OAB-dry will be randomized to receive one of two TES at home programs for 4 weeks. After completion of the program, the participant's symptoms will be assessed with standardized patient questionnaires. There will then be a 3 week washout period followed by the second at-home TES program. At the completion of the second program, the participant's symptoms will be assessed with the same standardized questionnaires. The participants will be followed for 6 months following the completion of the TES program.

    at UCLA

Last updated: