Skip to main content

Phantom Limb Pain clinical trials at University of California Health

3 in progress, 1 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields for Post-Amputation Pain

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Pulsed electromagnetic field therapy is a possible method of pain control involving the application of electromagnetic energy (also termed nonthermal, pulsed, shortwave radiofrequency therapy). Food and Drug Administration-cleared devices have been in clinical use for over 70 years. For decades, available devices consisted of a large signal generator and bulky coil applicator that were not portable and produced significant electromagnetic interference, making them impractical for common use. However, small, lightweight, relatively inexpensive, noninvasive, Food and Drug Administration-cleared devices that function for 30 days are now available to treat acute and chronic pain, decrease inflammation and edema, and hasten wound healing and bone regeneration. Therefore, it has the potential to concurrently improve analgesia and decrease or even negate opioid requirements, only without the limitations of opioids and peripheral nerve blocks. The purpose of this pilot study is to explore the possibility of treating chronic post-amputation pain with nonthermal, pulsed shortwave (radiofrequency) therapy, optimize the study protocol, and estimate the treatment effect in preparation for developing subsequent definitive clinical trials.

    at UCSD

  • Closed-loop Deep Brain Stimulation to Treat Refractory Neuropathic Pain

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) holds promise as a new option for patients suffering from treatment-resistant chronic pain, but current technology is unable to reliably achieve long-term pain symptom relief. A "one-size-fits-all" approach of continuous, 24/7 brain stimulation has helped patients with some movement disorders, but the key to reducing pain may be the activation of stimulation only when needed, as this may help keep the brain from adapting to stimulation effects. By expanding the technological capabilities of an investigative brain stimulation device, the investigators will enable the delivery of stimulation only when pain signals in the brain are high, and then test whether this more personalized stimulation leads to reliable symptom relief for chronic pain patients over extended periods of time.

    at UCSF

  • Psilocybin-assisted Therapy for Phantom Limb Pain

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This double-blind placebo-controlled pilot study seeks to investigate whether psilocybin can be safely administered to people with chronic phantom limb pain (PLP) in a supportive setting with close follow-up, and its effects on pain symptoms and other moods, attitudes, and behaviors. The investigators' primary hypotheses are that psilocybin is safe to administer in people with PLP and that it will reduce scores on measures of pain. The investigators will also assess a number of secondary measures related to the behavioral and neural responses to pain after psilocybin treatment.

    at UCSD

Our lead scientists for Phantom Limb Pain research studies include .

Last updated: