Skip to main content

Postoperative Pain clinical trials at UC Health
11 in progress, 6 open to eligible people

  • A Study of the Experimental Medicine Ropivacaine for Pain Control After Kidney Transplant

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study is a comparison of the analgesic efficacy of transversus abdominis plane (TAP) blocks with ropivacaine bolus plus continuous ropivacaine infusion via catheters versus single shot TAP blocks with liposomal bupivacaine.

    at UC Davis

  • Closed-Loop Deep Brain Stimulation for Refractory Chronic Pain

    open to eligible people ages 22-80

    Chronic pain affects 1 in 4 US adults, and many cases are resistant to almost any treatment. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) holds promise as a new option for patients suffering from treatment-resistant chronic pain, but traditional approaches target only brain regions involved in one aspect of the pain experience and provide continuous 24/7 brain stimulation which may lose effect over time. By developing new technology that targets multiple, complimentary brain regions in an adaptive fashion, the investigators will test a new therapy for chronic pain that has potential for better, more enduring analgesia.

    at UCSF

  • Comparison of Preoperative Ultrasound Guided Pectoralis Nerve Block Placement/ Intra-operative Placement

    “Help us with research that we hope will lead to improved nerve blocks and increased patient satisfaction with their operative experience!”

    open to eligible females ages 18 years and up

    This study investigates the use of post-operative on-Q pain catheters for tissue expander based breast reconstruction, versus conventional ultrasound-guided blocks placed pre-operatively.

    at UC Davis

  • Evaluation of Abdominal Wall Block With Liposomal Bupivacaine for Post-Operative Analgesia in Donor Nephrectomy

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    A blinded randomized control trial in living kidney donors. The study group will receive a liposomal bupivacaine Trans Quadratus Lumborum (TQL) block after the induction of general anesthesia. The following study variables will be collected postoperatively following arrival in the post-anesthesia care unit. Current and maximum intensity pain scores will be documented by nurses in Electronic Health Record (EHR). Total opiate dose consumed every 24 hours will be collected from the EHR and pain diary after discharge. Patient satisfaction will be evaluated using the Revised American Pain Society Patient Outcome Questionnaire (APS-POQ-R) 24 hours' post-procedure. Incidence of nausea will be extracted from nursing notes.

    at UCLA

  • Minimally Invasive Thoracic Surgery Intercostal Nerve Block Trial

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The Minimally Invasive Thoracic Surgery Intercostal Nerve Block Trial is a single center, double-blind, randomized, active-comparator controlled clinical trial to assess the analgesic efficacy of intercostal nerve block by Liposomal Bupivacaine versus Standard Bupivacaine in subjects undergoing lung resection by robotic or video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery.

    at UCSF

  • Supracondylar Post-Operative Pain Study

    open to eligible people ages 5-12

    The purpose of this study to investigate post-operative pain control in pediatric patients with closed supracondylar humerus fracture who undergo closed reduction and percutaneous pinning. Currently, it is standard of care that patients receive a narcotic prescription for post-operative pain control. All patients will initially be seen in our pediatric urgent care and recruited at the time of surgery. Patients will be randomized to receiving acetaminophen and ibuprofen or acetaminophen and oxycodone. Parents will not be blinded to the acetaminophen but both investigators, parents and the patients will be blinded to the study drug (ibuprofen or oxycodone). Pain level will be assessed using the Wong-Baker FACES scale and parents will be asked to fill out a questionnaire regarding their satisfaction with the surgery and pain control. Parents will also fill out a medication log until the patient no longer requires pain medication. The duration of participation in the study is approximately 1 week and requires 2 visits (time of recruitment at surgery to 1st post-op visit). This study is being conducted in hopes of reducing opioid prescription after surgical fixation of uncomplicated supracondylar humerus fractures if our study can show that patient's pain levels post-operatively and parent/patient satisfaction are unchanged or improved in the acetaminophen and ibuprofen arm.

    at UCLA

  • Electrical Stimulation for the Treatment of Pain Following Total Knee Arthroplasty Using the SPRINT Beta System

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of this study is to determine if electrical stimulation (small levels of electricity) in addition to the standard of care can safely and effectively reduce pain following total knee replacement more than the standard of care, alone. This study involves a device called the SPRINT Beta System. The SPRINT Beta System delivers mild electrical stimulation to nerves in the leg that received the knee replacement. The SPRINT Beta System includes a small wire (called a "lead") that is placed through the skin in the upper leg. It also includes a device worn on the body that delivers stimulation (called the SPRINT Beta Stimulator). About half the subjects in this study will receive the SPRINT Beta system (treatment group) and half will not (control group). Both groups will receive the standard of care.

    at UCSD

  • Optimizing Acute Post-Operative Dental Pain Management Using New Health Information Technology

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The investigators seek to implement a dental patient reported outcomes system using mobile phone and text messaging to target the over-reliance on pre-emptively prescribed opioids by dental providers. If successful, this project will help dentists actively track and manage their patients' pain after hours and enhance the overall care experience.

    at UCSF

  • Peri-operative Use of a Pain Injection in Pediatric Patients With Cerebral Palsy

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Pain management in pediatric patients presents a difficult challenge. Unlike adults, pediatric patients often cannot communicate their pain management needs clearly. Adequate pain control after surgery is pivotal for these patients in order to prevent negative physiologic and psychologic complications and to improve surgical outcomes. There is an ongoing shift away from the use of opioids in the post-operative setting due to both their negative side effects and their high potential for dependence and abuse. A variety of new techniques of multimodal pain management have been developed and utilized in elective orthopaedic procedures. Injection of local anesthetics is becoming a widely popular technique utilized in adult arthroplasty. This technique blocks pain directly at the site of injection, and therefore can improve post-operative pain while minimizing side effects. Evidence has demonstrated this technique to be both safe and effective, resulting in reduced opioid consumption post-operatively. However, this technique has not been studied for use in pediatric patients, a population in which reduced narcotic use is equally, if not more important than in adult patients. This study is a prospective, randomized controlled trial with 2 parallel arms. The goal of this study is to assess the efficacy of a surgical-site pain injection administered in pediatric patients with cerebral palsy undergoing major hip surgery. Patients who are scheduled to undergo surgery will be randomized to either intervention (injection of a pain cocktail) or placebo (injection of normal saline). The pain cocktail includes three medications: ropivacaine (a local anesthetic), ketorolac (an anti-inflammatory medication), and epinephrine (a medication to constrict blood vessels and increase the duration of action of any co-administered medications). A surgeon who is blinded to treatment group will administer the injection at the end of the procedure, prior to the patient waking from anesthesia. The injection is in addition to our typical multi-modal pain control protocol, which includes epidural anesthesia, acetaminophen, anti-inflammatories, oral narcotics and anti-spasmodic agents. Patients will then be monitored post-operatively and pain medication consumption (both while in the hospital post-operatively and for the first two weeks following discharge), patient-reported and/or nurse-recorded pain scores, length of hospital stay, and adverse effects will be recorded. At the first post-operative visit, patients' parents will be asked to complete a survey designed to assess parent satisfaction with their child's pain management after surgery. Patients, parents, and surgeons will be blinded to treatment group allocation. Data will be collected while the patient is in the hospital, after surgery (average duration 3-4 days), and at the first post-operative visit two to three weeks after surgery.

    at UCLA

  • Peripheral Nerve Blocks for Major Lower Extremity Amputations

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This study will be a double-blinded randomized controlled trial analyzing all patients who will undergo major lower extremity amputations by the vascular surgery service at UCSF Fresno between July 2017 and June 2018 to determine if regional nerve blocks (sciatic and femoral) have any effect on postoperative pain control, narcotic requirements, and length of stay compared with standard post-operative narcotic regimens.

    at UCSF

  • The Effect of Liposomal Bupivacaine on Post Operative Pain and Narcotic Use After Bariatric Surgery

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study is prospective, randomized trial in which the efficacy of liposomal bupivacaine (Exparel®) is compared to standard bupivacaine local surgical site injection in reducing total IV and oral morphine equivalents required after laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Liposomal bupivacaine is a 72-hour bupivacaine that is slowly released from tissue over the course of three days. Having a long acting local anesthetic should provide better pain control than conventional bupivacaine which has a 3.5-hour half-life. In some studies, the use of liposomal bupivacaine has been shown to decrease pain and narcotic use after surgery. This has not yet been studied in bariatric patients and the use of liposomal bupivacaine can potentially improve patient post-operative pain control, decrease narcotic use, decrease hospital length of stay and readmission rates and improve patient satisfaction after bariatric surgery.

    at UCSF

Last updated: