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Radiation Toxicity clinical trials at UC Health
5 in progress, 1 open to new patients

  • Predicting the Risk of Failure in Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    open to eligible males ages 18-120

    RATIONALE: Gathering information about the Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, and cancer stage from patients who have undergone radiation therapy for prostate cancer may help doctors predict how patients respond to treatment and help plan the best treatment.

    PURPOSE: This clinical trial is studying the Gleason score, PSA level, and cancer stage in predicting outcome in patients who have undergone radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer.

    at UCSF

  • Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well giving cisplatin and radiation therapy together with or without carboplatin and paclitaxel works in treating patients with cervical cancer has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, carboplatin, and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of [cancer/tumor] cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. External radiation therapy uses high-energy x rays to kill tumor cells. Internal radiation uses radioactive material placed directly into or near a tumor to kill tumor cells. It is not yet known whether giving cisplatin and external and internal radiation therapy together with carboplatin and paclitaxel kills more tumor cells.

    at UC Irvine UC Davis UCLA

  • High-Dose or Standard-Dose Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy With or Without Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    RATIONALE: Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, carboplatin work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them. It is not yet known whether high-dose radiation therapy is more effective than standard-dose radiation therapy when given together with combination chemotherapy with or without cetuximab in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

    PURPOSE: This randomized phase III trial is studying high-dose or standard-dose radiation therapy given together with chemotherapy with or without cetuximab to see how well they work in treating patients with newly diagnosed stage III non-small cell lung cancer that cannot be removed by surgery.

    at UCSF UCSD UC Davis

  • Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Prostate Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    RATIONALE: Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Specialized radiation therapy that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Given radiation therapy in different ways may kill more tumor cells.

    PURPOSE: This randomized phase II trial studies radiation therapy to see how well it works in treating patients with prostate cancer.

    at UCSF

  • Standard Versus Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Endometrial or Cervical Cancer

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    RATIONALE: Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays and other types of radiation to kill tumor cells. Specialized radiation therapy that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue.

    PURPOSE: This randomized phase III trial is studying two different methods of radiation and their side effects and comparing how well they work in treating endometrial and cervical cancer after surgery.

    at UCSD UC Davis

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