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Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis clinical trials at UC Health
7 in progress, 3 open to new patients

  • Estriol Treatment in Multiple Sclerosis (MS): Effect on Cognition

    open to eligible females ages 18-55

    Approximately 50% of people diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) will develop problems with cognition. Currently, there are no FDA-approved treatments targeting cognitive function in Multiple Sclerosis. This trial will ascertain whether treatment with an estrogen pill, used in combination with standard MS anti-inflammatory drugs, can improve cognitive testing as compared to treatment with a placebo pill in combination with standard anti-inflammatory drugs in women with MS.

    at UCLA

  • Traditional Versus Early Aggressive Therapy for Multiple Sclerosis Trial

    open to eligible people ages 18-60

    FDA-approved multiple sclerosis (MS) disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) target the relapsing phase of MS but have minimal impact once the progressive phase has begun. It is unclear if, in the relapsing phase, there is an advantage of early aggressive therapy with respect to preventing long-term disability. The infectious risks and other complications associated with higher-efficacy treatments highlight the need to quantify their effectiveness in preventing disability. The TRaditional versus Early Aggressive Therapy for MS (TREAT-MS) trial is a pragmatic, randomized controlled trial that has two primary aims: 1) to evaluate, jointly and independently among patients deemed at higher risk vs. lower risk for disability accumulation, whether an "early aggressive" therapy approach, versus starting with a traditional, first-line therapy, influences the intermediate-term risk of disability, and 2) to evaluate if, among patients deemed at lower risk for disability who start on first-line MS therapies but experience breakthrough disease, those who switch to a higher-efficacy versus a new first-line therapy have different intermediate-term risk of disability.

    at UCSF

  • Vitamin D Supplementation in Multiple Sclerosis

    open to eligible people ages 18-50

    Low vitamin D levels have been shown to increase a person's risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS), and patients with MS who have lower vitamin D levels are at increased risk of having attacks. However, it is not known if giving supplemental vitamin D to those with MS reduces the risk of attacks, and some research suggests that vitamin D could even be harmful to people with MS. In this clinical trial, patients with relapsing-remitting MS will receive high-dose or low-dose oral vitamin D in addition to an approved therapy for MS, glatiramer acetate. Patients will be evaluated for two years, and the effect of high-dose vitamin D supplementation on the rate of MS attacks and on the number of new lesions and change in brain volume on MRI will be determined. Establishing this association will have major implications for the treatment of individuals with MS throughout the world.

    at UCSF

  • A Study of Ocrelizumab in Participants With Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS) Who Have Had a Suboptimal Response to an Adequate Course of Disease-Modifying Treatment (DMT)

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This study will evaluate the efficacy and safety of ocrelizumab in participants with RRMS who have had a suboptimal response to an adequate course of DMT. Participants will receive ocrelizumab as an initial dose of two 300-milligrams (mg) intravenous (IV) infusions (600 mg total) separated by 14 days followed by one 600-mg IV infusion for a maximum of 4 doses (up to 96 weeks). Anticipated time on study treatment is 96 weeks.

    at UCSF UCLA

  • A Study of the Efficacy and Safety of Ocrelizumab in Patients With Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is a phase II, multicenter, randomized, parallel-group, partially blinded, placebo and Avonex (interferon beta-1a) controlled dose finding study to evaluate the efficacy as measured by brain MRI lesions, and safety of 2 dose regimens of ocrelizumab in participants with Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS).

    at UCSF

  • Fecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT) of FMP30 in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    In this Phase 1b open-label prospective clinical trial, patients with relapsing-remitting MS will undergo FMT of FMP30 (donor stool) via colonoscopy and immunological efficacy endpoints will be assessed at various time points. The active phase of the study will continue for 12 weeks post-FMT with safety and biomarker (engraftment) follow-up for 48 weeks. A parallel observational control arm of MS patients who otherwise satisfy study inclusion criteria based on their MS phenotype, demographics, disease duration and prior use of allowable MS therapies, will be recruited as a comparison observational group to measure stability of stool and serum immunological measures. The study duration for the Observational Control Arm is 12 weeks.

    at UCSF

  • Study to Evaluate the Effectiveness and Safety of Ocrelizumab in Participants With Early Stage Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS)

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This is a prospective, multicenter, open-label, single-arm, phase 3b study which evaluates effectiveness and safety of ocrelizumab in participants with early stage RRMS. The study will consist of an open-label treatment period of 192 weeks and follow-up period of at least 48 weeks.

    at UC Irvine

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