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Renal Failure clinical trials at UC Health

6 in progress, 1 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Comparison Study of the Experimental Human Acellular Vessel For Dialysis in End-Stage Renal Disease

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The main purpose of this study is to compare the Human Acellular Vessel (HAV) with arteriovenous fistula (AVF) when used for hemodialysis access

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCLA UCSD UCSF

  • A Study of Past Experimental Treatment With Dexmedetomidine in Patients With Renal Transplants

    “This retrospective study will examine the use of Dexmedtomidine in renal transplants.”

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Investigators aim to retrospectively research patients undergoing renal transplants that received dexmedetomidine perioperatively to see if dexmedetomidine use protects renal function. Investigators hope to elucidate any association between renal transplant patients and perioperative dexmedetomidine administration, these include (but are not limited to) UOP, Cr/GFR, morbidity, mortality, in hospital complications and failure rate. Investigators will research both living and cadaveric renal transplants.

    at UC Davis

  • Biomarkers, Genomics, Physiology in Critically Ill and ECMO Patients

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    Patients in end-stage cardiac failure and/or respiratory failure may be started on a rescue therapy known as Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO). One of the major clinical questions is how to manage the ventilator when patients are on ECMO therapy. Ventilator Induced Lung Injury (VILI) can result from aggressive ventilation of the lung during critical illness. VILI and lung injury such as Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) can further increase the total body inflammation and stress, this is known as biotrauma. Biotrauma is one of the mechanisms that causes multi-organ failure in critically ill patients. One advantage of ECMO is the ability to greatly reduce the use of the ventilator and thus VILI by taking control of the patient's oxygenation and acid-base status. By minimizing VILI during ECMO we can reduce biotrauma and thus multi-organ failure. Since the optimal ventilator settings for ECMO patients are not known, we plan to study the impact of different ventilator settings during ECMO on patient's physiology and biomarkers of inflammation and injury.

    at UCSD

  • Comparison of the Human Acellular Vessel (HAV) With ePTFE Grafts as Conduits for Hemodialysis

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The main purpose of this study is to compare the Human Acellular Vessel (HAV) with ePTFE grafts when used for hemodialysis access.

    at UC Irvine

  • Effect of Lost Wage Reimbursement to Kidney Donors on Living Donation Rates

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The study is designed as a randomized controlled trial. The investigators hypothesize that kidney transplant recipient candidates whose donors are offered reimbursement of lost wages (treatment arm) will have a higher probability of receiving a living donor kidney transplant than those randomized to no offer of lost wage reimbursement (control arm). The study expects to demonstrate incremental living donor kidney transplants by assisting individuals who wish to be living organ donors but would be otherwise unable to do so due to the obligatory forfeit of income during the evaluation, donation surgery, and post-operative recuperation periods.

    at UCLA

  • Veliparib, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery and Liver or Kidney Dysfunction

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of veliparib when given together with paclitaxel and carboplatin in treating patients with solid tumors that are metastatic or cannot be removed by surgery and liver or kidney dysfunction. Veliparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving veliparib together with paclitaxel and carboplatin may kill more tumor cells.

    at UC Davis

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