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Sedentary Lifestyle clinical trials at UC Health
7 in progress, 6 open to new patients

  • A Smartphone App to Improve Physical Activity

    open to eligible people ages 65-84

    The purpose of this study is to develop, test, and optimize a physical activity (PA)-tracking smartphone app and specialty features, which are designed to facilitate older adults' PA by targeting common barriers in this population. For example, one feature sends messages throughout the day about the good things about growing older to combat negative views about aging which has been linked to decreased PA. Participants will include older adult smartphone users who are between the ages of 65 and 84 and are not very physically active. In phase one of the study, three groups of five older adults will be formed to test the PA-tracking app and one of three specialty features for a two-week period, followed by a focus group to learn about the older adults' experiences. In phase two, approximately 100 participants will be randomly assigned to one of eight groups that include various combinations of specialty features with the PA tracker, for the purpose of pilot testing the app for a four-month period. Testing will occur at the beginning and the end of the four-month intervention period, and will measure PA levels, sedentary activity time, self-reported PA, and functional mobility.

    at UCLA

  • MyLife: A Digital Health Coaching Program

    open to eligible people ages 18-64

    Lifestyle behaviors such as sleep, diet, and physical activity, are implicated in a number of chronic conditions including hypertension, obesity, diabetes, heart failure, and obstructive sleep apnea. Research shows that despite awareness of this fact, patients at risk for lifestyle-related chronic diseases have difficulty adhering to lifestyle change recommendations made by their physicians, and face challenges when attempting to modify unhealthy behaviors. New technologies, such as wearable activity trackers and automated text messaging, are promising tools for monitoring and promoting healthy lifestyle behaviors among patients. This randomized controlled trial will evaluate the effect of a digital health program, which uses pre-medical post-baccalaureate or undergraduate health coaches, wearable activity trackers (Fitbit Charge 2), and mobile messaging, compared to wearable activity trackers (Fitbit Charge 2) alone in promoting lifestyle change among overweight and sedentary 18-64 year old patients recruited from UCLA Health primary care clinics.

    at UCLA

  • Primary Care-Based Physical Activity for Diabetic Latinas

    open to eligible people ages 18-70

    The goal of this proposal is to test the efficacy of a primary care-delivered, print-based physical activity intervention for Latinas with type II diabetes. The investigators will test the efficacy of this intervention by randomizing 80 Latinas with type II diabetes recruited through UCSD Health System primary care to either the adapted web-based physical activity intervention or standard of care, and assessing physical activity gains at six and 12 months. The ultimate goal is to develop a print-based physical activity intervention for diabetic Latinas that could be widely disseminated through primary care.

    at UCSD

  • Sedentary Behavior Interrupted Randomized Controlled Trial (P2)

    open to eligible females ages 55 years and up

    Epidemiological findings indicate that older adults do not meet physical activity (PA) guidelines & spend up to 11 hrs/day sitting. Given the high prevalence of sedentary behavior (SB), the higher chronic disease risk in this population, & the age-associated challenges of meeting traditional PA guidelines, involving longer bouts of moderate PA, the investigators hypothesize that older adult health will benefit from new strategies to interrupt sitting. This protocol "Sedentary Behavior Interrupted: A randomized trial of 3-month effects on biomarkers of healthy aging and physical functioning in the real world (Project 2)" is part of a National Institutes of Aging Program Grant called "Sedentary Time & Aging Mortality and Physical Function (STAR). The overall purpose of the STAR program to is to better understand how to interrupt sitting time and the consequences for healthy aging in postmenopausal women. This protocol (also referred to Project 2 of the STAR program) is a 3-arm randomized control trial designed to assess ways of interrupting sitting in 405 overweight, postmenopausal women.

    at UCSD

  • Sedentary Behavior Interrupted: A Trial of Acute Effects on Biomarkers of Healthy Aging

    open to eligible females ages 55 years and up

    This protocol "Sedentary Behavior Interrupted: A randomized crossover trial of acute effects on biomarkers of healthy aging in the laboratory (Project 1)" is part of a National Institutes of Aging Program Grant called "Sedentary Time & Aging Mortality and Physical Function (STAR). The overall purpose of the STAR program to is to better understand how to interrupt sitting time and the consequences for healthy aging in postmenopausal women. This protocol (also referred to Project 1 of the STAR program) is a 3-condition randomized crossover clinical trial of up to 86 postmenopausal women to test whether different interruptions to prolonged sitting improve metabolism.

    at UCSD

  • Trial to Reduce Sitting Time in Postmenopausal Latina Women at Increased Risk for Heart Disease

    open to eligible females ages 55 years and up

    Project 2 of the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) American Heart Association (AHA) Women's Health Program will assess 3-month changes in sitting time, standing time, physical activity and blood pressure in a randomized control trial (RCT). This 2-arm RCT will occur in the community with post menopausal Latina women (N=250) who spend at least 8 hrs/day sitting and have increased risk for cardiovascular disease through high BMI and other cardiometabolic risk factors. Women will be identified through the San Ysidro Health Center and assessed at the South Bay Latino Research Center.

    at UCSD

  • Culturally Tailoring a Stroke Intervention in Community Senior Centers

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Stroke is a cruel disease that disproportionately kills and disables African-Americans, Latinos, Chinese-Americans and Korean-Americans; seniors with high blood pressure are at particularly high risk. There is a higher incidence of hemorrhagic stroke in African Americans, Latinos, and Chinese Americans relative to non-Latino whites. Asian-Americans have up to 1.4 higher relative risk of stroke death compared to U.S. non-Latino whites. A critical need therefore exists for a sustainable and scalable mechanism to disseminate culturally-tailored stroke knowledge/prevention education in community-based settings where large numbers of these high-risk ethnic minority older adult groups are regularly served, such as in federally funded Multipurpose Senior Centers (MPCs) that exist across the nation (16 of which are in Los Angeles alone). The overall objective of the proposed study is to develop and test the implementation of a training program for case managers at senior centers to implement a stoke knowledge/prevention education program among four high-risk ethnic minority older adult groups--Korean-American, Chinese-American, African-American, Latinos. We propose to develop a culturally-tailored case manager training curriculum, implement the training at 4 community-based sites, and evaluate the training model using a randomized wait-list controlled trial (n=244) testing the hypothesis that training case managers will decrease older adult participants' stroke risk in a sustainable fashion through increasing their preventative behavior (i.e. increasing their physical activity--mean steps/day--at 1 and 3 months). Findings will inform similar community-academic partnership efforts around stroke and other disease-specific prevention research/interventions; they will also determine next steps in terms of whether this case manager-centric model can be scaled up and deployed in other community-based settings.

    at UCLA

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