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Spinal Cord Injury clinical trials at University of California Health

15 in progress, 7 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Study of the Experimental Neuro-Spinal Scaffold™ Device for Complete Thoracic AIS A Spinal Cord Injury

    open to eligible people ages 16-70

    This is a randomized, controlled, single-blind, multicenter, two Arm (Treatment or "Scaffold" Arm; Standard of Care or "Comparator" Arm) of a Neuro-Spinal Scaffold to evaluate whether the Scaffold is safe and demonstrates probable benefit for the treatment of complete T2-T12 spinal cord injury as compared to standard of care open spine surgery.

    at UC Davis UCSD

  • Closed-Loop Deep Brain Stimulation for Refractory Chronic Pain

    open to eligible people ages 22-80

    Chronic pain affects 1 in 4 US adults, and many cases are resistant to almost any treatment. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) holds promise as a new option for patients suffering from treatment-resistant chronic pain, but traditional approaches target only brain regions involved in one aspect of the pain experience and provide continuous 24/7 brain stimulation which may lose effect over time. By developing new technology that targets multiple, complimentary brain regions in an adaptive fashion, the investigators will test a new therapy for chronic pain that has potential for better, more enduring analgesia.

    at UCSF

  • ECoG BMI for Motor and Speech Control

    open to eligible people ages 21 years and up

    Test the feasibility of using electrocorticography (ECoG) signals to control complex devices for motor and speech control in adults severely affected by neurological disorders.

    at UCSF

  • Improving Bladder Function in SCI by Neuromodulation

    open to eligible males ages 18-45

    This trial will investigate the safety and utility of spinal cord neuromodulation to improve urinary bladder function in the context of spinal cord injury.

    at UCLA

  • Safety Study of Human Spinal Cord-derived Neural Stem Cell Transplantation for the Treatment of Chronic SCI

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    This is a safety study of human spinal cord-derived neural stem cell (HSSC) transplantation for the treatment of chronic spinal cord injury.

    at UCSD

  • Spinal Cord Neuromodulation for SCI

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study is designed to assess the strategy of using spinal cord stimulation to improve the ability to move in spinal cord injured humans.

    at UCLA

  • Telepsychology in Spinal Cord Injury

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study will determine the effectiveness of tele-psychology in treating persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) with depressed mood in the early period post-rehabilitation discharge. Depression among individuals with SCI is the most common psychological condition following an injury; 22% of civilians with SCI and 28% of veterans with SCI experience depression after injury, which is higher than the able-bodied population (Williams 2015; Ullrich 2014). Individuals with SCI face many barriers in receiving psychotherapy, such as lack of accessible transportation, unfamiliarity with community resources, or stigma associated with seeking treatment for depression, which this project aims to address. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), which helps people develop different ways of thinking and behaving to reduce their psychological distress, will be provided via iPad FaceTime by a psychologist with expertise in working with persons with SCI. The objectives of the proposed project are to reduce depressive symptoms, decrease associated symptoms of anxiety, and to improve satisfaction with life with CBT provided via tele-psychology. The secondary objective is to show intermediate efficacy of tele-psychology in persons with SCI with depressed mood.

    at UCSF

  • Advancing Understanding of Transportation Options

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This Stage II randomized, controlled, longitudinal trial seeks to assess the acceptability, feasibility, and effects of a driving decision aid use among geriatric patients and providers. This multi-site trial will (1) test the driving decision aid (DDA) in improving decision making and quality (knowledge, decision conflict, values concordance and behavior intent); and (2) determine its effects on specific subpopulations of older drivers (stratified for cognitive function, decisional capacity, and attitudinally readiness for a mobility transition). The overarching hypotheses are that the DDA will help older adults make high-quality decisions, which will mitigate the negative psychosocial impacts of driving reduction, and that optimal DDA use will target certain populations and settings.

    at UCSD

  • Canadian-American Spinal Cord Perfusion Pressure and Biomarker Study

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    This multicenter study will enroll 100 patients with acute traumatic cervical and thoracic SCI who have a lumbar intrathecal catheter inserted within 24 hours of their injury. The lumbar intrathecal catheter will be inserted pre-operatively for the measurement of ITP and the collection of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples. SCPP will be calculated as the difference between MAP and the ITP. There are two important distinct yet related objectives in this prospective interventional study. 1. Determine the effect of SCPP maintenance ≥ 65 mmHg in acute SCI on neurologic recovery as measured by ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS) grade conversion and motor score improvement. 2. Collect CSF and blood samples for the measurement of neurochemical biomarkers and storage for future biomarker discovery and validation studies.

    at UCSF

  • Closed-loop Deep Brain Stimulation to Treat Refractory Neuropathic Pain

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) holds promise as a new option for patients suffering from treatment-resistant chronic pain, but current technology is unable to reliably achieve long-term pain symptom relief. A "one-size-fits-all" approach of continuous, 24/7 brain stimulation has helped patients with some movement disorders, but the key to reducing pain may be the activation of stimulation only when needed, as this may help keep the brain from adapting to stimulation effects. By expanding the technological capabilities of an investigative brain stimulation device, the investigators will enable the delivery of stimulation only when pain signals in the brain are high, and then test whether this more personalized stimulation leads to reliable symptom relief for chronic pain patients over extended periods of time.

    at UCSF

  • Neuromodulation to Improve Respiratory Function in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This is a phase 1 study of safety and feasibility of cervical spinal cord stimulator implantation in cervical SCI subjects who are ventilator dependent. The Investigators will be focusing on the safety and feasibility of this approach. Participants may qualify for the study if they are male or female 18-75 years old, are at least 1 year after original injury, have injury at C2 to C7 level, and dependent on mechanical ventilation to help them breathe. Additionally, they need to be able to attend up to twice weekly testing sessions for up to 21 months.

    at UCLA

  • Safety And Efficacy Study Of Intravenous (IV) Administration Of Elezanumab To Assess Change In Upper Extremity Motor Score (UEMS) In Adult Participants With Acute Traumatic Cervical Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    Acute Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) is a rare injury that leads to permanent neuromotor impairment and sudden disability. Approximately 25,000 people experience cervical SCI in the United States, Europe, and Japan every year. The purpose of this study is to see if elezanumab is safe and assess change in Upper Extremity Motor Score (UEMS) in participants with acute traumatic cervical SCI. Elezanumab is an investigational drug being developed for the treatment of SCI. Elezanumab is a monoclonal antibody, that binds to an inhibitor of neuronal regeneration and neutralizes the inhibitor, thus potentially promoting neuroregeneration. This study is "double-blinded", which means that neither trial participants nor the study doctors will know who will be given which study drug. Study doctors put the participants in 1 of 2 groups, called treatment arms. Each group receives a different treatment. There is a 1 in 3 chance that participants will be assigned to placebo. Participants 18-70 years of age with a SCI will be enrolled. Approximately 54 participants will be enrolled in the study in approximately 36 sites worldwide. Participants will receive intravenous (IV) doses of elezanumab or placebo within 24 hours of injury and every 4 weeks thereafter through Week 48 for a total of 13 doses. There may be a higher treatment burden for participants in this trial compared to their standard of care. Participants will attend regular visits during the course of the study at a hospital or clinic. The effect of the treatment will be checked by medical assessments, blood tests, checking for side effects and completing questionnaires.

    at UC Davis

  • Study to Assess the Efficacy and Safety of MT-3921 in Subjects With Acute Traumatic Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The purpose of this study is to compare the efficacy and safety of intravenous (IV) infusions of MT-3921 to placebo in subjects with acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury. Subjects meeting eligibility criteria will enter the 6-month double-blind period. Subjects will be randomized in a 2:1 ratio to receive MT-3921 or placebo in a double blind manner.

    at UC Davis

  • The INSPIRE Study: Probable Benefit of the Neuro-Spinal Scaffold for Treatment of AIS A Thoracic Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This is an HDE probable benefit, open-label, non- randomized, single-arm, multicenter study to evaluate the safety and probable benefit of the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-b-poly(L-lysine) Scaffold ("Scaffold") in subjects with thoracic AIS A traumatic spinal cord injury at neurological level of injury of T2-T12.

    at UC Davis

  • Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in Spinal Cord Injury

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    The overall goal of Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in Spinal Cord Injury (TRACK-SCI) study is to determine the relationships among the clinical, neuroimaging, cognitive, genetic and proteomic biomarker characteristics of acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). TRACK-SCI seeks to combine high quality care variables with high density physiology data collection to better understand diagnose, characterize, and track the temporal profile of recovery for SCI patients. The Investigators are enrolling patients within 24 hours of injury who present to a TRACK-SCI site with a spinal cord injury that meets eligibility criteria.

    at UCSF

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