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Tibial Fractures clinical trials at UC Health
3 in progress, 2 open to eligible people

  • A Multicenter Randomized Trial Comparing IM Nails and Plate Fixation in Proximal Tibial Fractures

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study looks at two types of surgical treatments and hopes to answer the question: which is the best way to surgically treat a proximal tibia fracture? Both procedures being studied are standard of care (used routinely) and use FDA approved devices. All medical and surgical treatment will be the same for participants as non-participants.

    at UCSF UC Davis

  • Study Evaluating CERAMENT™|G in Open Diaphyseal Tibial Fractures

    open to eligible people ages 18-75

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the safety and effectiveness of CERAMENT™|G used in conjunction with standard-of-care treatment compared to standard-of-care treatment alone in the care of subjects with open fractures of the tibial diaphysis.

    at UC Irvine UCLA

  • NSAID Use and Healing After Tibia Fractures and Achilles Tendon Ruptures

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Rationale: The Emergency Department (ED) typically serves as the front line for patients with acute fractures and tendon ruptures. Pain control for these patients is an essential task of the ED physician. With the advent of the opioid epidemic, ED physicians are becoming more inclined to prescribe non-narcotic pain medications such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Yet, the effects of NSAIDs on musculoskeletal healing are controversial. The few human studies examining the effects of NSAID use on fracture healing have provided conflicting results. Even less is known about the effects of NSAIDs on tendon healing as this information has largely been gleaned from rodent studies with contradictory findings. There has never been a large, prospective, randomized, double-blinded study to determine the effects of NSAIDs on healing after fractures or tendon ruptures. Here, I propose to pilot the first prospective, randomized, double-blinded study examining the effects of NSAID use on healing after tibia fractures and Achilles tendon ruptures. Aim 1 seeks to determine whether NSAID use is associated with an increased incidence of fracture nonunion and worse functional recovery six months following tibia fractures. I hypothesize that NSAID use after tibia fractures will be associated with an increased incidence of fracture nonunion and worse functional recovery. Aim 2 seeks to determine whether NSAID use is associated with worse functional recovery six months after Achilles tendon ruptures. I hypothesize that NSAID use after Achilles tendon ruptures will be associated with worse functional recovery. Significance: Emergency Department providers commonly prescribe NSAIDs for pain control following fractures and tendon injuries. However, the implications of this practice on bone and tendon healing are unknown. This proposal will pilot the first prospective, randomized, double-blinded study to determine whether NSAID use affects healing after tibia fractures and Achilles tendon ruptures. Results from this study will impact NSAID prescribing patterns for tibia fractures and Achilles tendon ruptures in the ED, either by demonstrating that they impair recovery and should be avoided, or that they need not be withheld as an effective non-narcotic form of pain control.

    at UCLA

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