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Tinnitus clinical trials at UC Health
3 in progress, 2 open to new patients

  • Acoustic and Electrical Stimulation for the Treatment of Tinnitus

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Tinnitus, or ringing in the ears, affects 10% to 30% of the population. Of those, 20% have tinnitus bothersome enough to seek medical attention. In many people, tinnitus can significantly affect the quality of life. At this point in time, there is no effective treatment or cure available for tinnitus. It has been found that electrical stimulation of the inner ear can reduce and in some cases eliminate tinnitus. The purpose of this research is to investigate both acoustic and electrical stimulation of the inner ear as a possible treatment of tinnitus. In both acoustic and electrical testing conditions, the subjects will be instructed to be familiar with a 0-10 ranking scale of loudness. In acoustic testing, the stimulus will be presented through headphones in a noiseless environment, and the subject will be asked to report on the loudness of the presented sound and the level of the tinnitus at 20-second intervals. If the subject cannot perceive the presence of the tinnitus, a value of zero will be assigned. A typical sound will be presented for 3 to 6 minutes. Loudness will be reported for 1 to 4 minutes after stimulus offset to measure the presence and duration of residual inhibition. Electrical stimulation will be delivered to the inner ear in three ways, 1. using a cochlear implant (implant placed in the inner ear to replace hearing function), 2. Using an electrode placed in the ear canal, and 3. using a small needle inserted through the ear drum. Various electrical signals will be used to evaluate the reduction in the tinnitus perception by the subject. The subjects will rate the loudness of the tinnitus before, during, and after the electrical signal. Surveys will be used to evaluate the tinnitus loudness and the quality of life of the subjects. Hearing tests will be used before and after the procedures. The long term goal of this research is to develop a device to treat tinnitus in people who can hear and to develop programs for cochlear implants that help treat tinnitus in deaf people.

    at UC Irvine

  • Internet-based CBT for Tinnitus

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Most tinnitus sufferers experiences significant anxiety or depression that worsens the subjective symptoms related to tinnitus. In this study, we intend to use internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in addition to sound therapy to provide psychotherapy to patients with tinnitus. Multiple research studies have found CBT to be effective in improving the subjective symptoms of tinnitus. The internet-based CBT course developed for this study is 8 weeks in duration and organized into eight 1-week modules; each module contains 2-4 separate lessons and homework assignments. Patients will be given unique usernames and passwords. In each weekly module, patients will review educational materials online, do exercises. and will be given feedback based on the results of the completed exercises. In addition, patients are given different meditation exercises each week for relaxation and coping with their tinnitus. These interactive materials enable patients to manage and control any negative feelings and thoughts that may be associated with tinnitus and help take their attention away from tinnitus. Tinnitus loudness and annoyance will be measured before and after the program. An internet-based course enables care providers to monitor patients' progress with the CBT course remotely, and allows patients to learn CBT at their own convenience and schedule.

    at UC Irvine

  • Pilot Study of Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) in Area LC for Chronic Tinnitus

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study will test the safety and effectiveness of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for patients with a big or very big problem with tinnitus (a sensation of noise in the head).

    at UCSF

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