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Tourette Syndrome clinical trials at UC Health
4 in progress, 1 open to new patients

  • Investigating Circadian Rhythms in Youth With Persistent Tic Disorders

    open to eligible people ages 13-17

    This study examines circadian rhythms and morningness-eveningness preference in youth with Persistent Tic Disorders (PTDs), including Tourette's Disorder (TD); and assesses the effects of wearable short wavelength light therapy on circadian rhythms and tic symptoms.

    at UCLA

  • Augmentation of Brief Habit Reversal Training With D-cycloserine or Placebo

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Expert reviews and practice parameter papers recommend behavior therapy as a first-line intervention for youth with chronic tic disorders (CTDs) with mild-to-moderate tic severity. Although behavior therapies like the Comprehensive Behavioral Intervention for Tics (CBIT) are efficacious in reducing tic symptom severity, only 50% of individuals exhibit a positive treatment response. Thus, there is a clear need to identify strategies to improve treatment response and/or accelerate therapeutic gains . The primary ingredient of CBIT is habit reversal training (HRT), which utilizes both extinction and associative learning. Psychosocial treatments relying on these learning mechanisms have demonstrated an enhanced and/or expedited therapeutic benefit when augmented with d-cycloserine (DCS). This feasibility study will examine the incremental efficacy of HRT+DCS over HRT+placebo for tics targeted with HRT. Eligibility criteria will parallel the child CBIT trial for generalizability and comparability, with the addition of DCS contraindications as exclusionary criteria. Parents and youth will complete a battery of clinical assessments to ascertain tic symptoms severity and co-occurring psychiatric conditions. Afterwards, participants will be randomly assigned to receive either HRT+DCS or HRT+placebo. Instead of a full course of HRT (8 sessions over 10 weeks), a more efficient Quick-Win/Fast-Fail trial design will be used that includes a truncated HRT protocol to provide results in a more timely fashion. As a result of this trial design, the primary outcome of this study will focus on the reduction of bothersome tic severity for those targeted in treatment rather than global severity reductions.

    at UCLA

  • Ecopipam Treatment of Tourette's Syndrome in Subjects 7-17 Years

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Tourette's Syndrome is a neurological disease characterized by motor and vocal tics. It has been hypothesized that abnormal interactions of dopamine with its receptors may cause the tics. The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that a drug (ecopipam) that selectively blocks dopamine D1/D5 receptors can reduce the frequency and severity of the tics.

    at UCLA

  • Psychosocial Intervention for Young Children With Chronic Tics

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Analysis of data from the recently completed NIH Child Comprehensive Behavioral Intervention for Tics (CBIT) study found a manualized behavioral treatment approach strongly superior to psychoeducation/supportive therapy for reducing tic severity in 9-16 year-old youths with TS or other Chronic Tic Disorders. Buoyed by the success of the NIH study, the research group now seeks to extend and disseminate the CBIT treatment through the systematic adaptation of the CBIT protocol for use across a broader range of ages and treatment settings. The goal of the this project is to develop a downward extension of the CBIT therapist guide and parent workbook for use in 4-8 year old children with chronic tics. The revised CBIT-JR manual/workbook will be pilot tested in five children at each of the three study sites (UCLA, UWM, Weill Cornell) in order to provide initial data regarding treatment feasibility and acceptability as well as our ability to implement the new intervention, along with relevant quality control procedures, consistently across sites. These pilot data will then be used to seek R01 support for a larger controlled multisite trial examining the efficacy of CBIT-JR. Although arguably more complex than a single-site design, we have opted for a multsite study in order: 1) to take advantage of the established productive collaborative relationship and collective expertise in childhood tic disorders and psychosocial treatment development across our three sites, 2) to collect the proposed feasibility data in a much shorter period of time than otherwise possible, and as noted above 3) to demonstrate the cross-site portability of the treatment - which will be necessary if we are to obtain subsequent funding for a larger-scale efficacy trial.

    at UCLA

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