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X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency clinical trials at University of California Health

2 research studies open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Gene Transfer for X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency in Newly Diagnosed Infants

    open to eligible males ages up to 24 months

    SCID-X1 is a genetic disorder of blood cells caused by DNA changes in a gene that is required for the normal development of the human immune system. The purpose of this study is to determine if a new method, called lentiviral gene transfer, can be used to treat SCID-X1. This method involves transferring a normal copy of the common gamma chain gene into the participant's bone marrow stem cells. The investigators want to determine if the procedure is safe, whether it can be done according to the methods they have developed, and whether the procedure will provide a normal immune system for the patient. It is hoped that this type of gene transfer may offer a new way to treat children with SCID-X1 that do not have a brother or sister who can be used as a donor for stem cell transplantation.

    at UCSF

  • Phase I/II Trial of Lentiviral Gene Transfer for SCID-X1 With Low Dose Targeted Busulfan Conditioning

    open to eligible males ages up to 5 years

    This is a phase I/II open label multi-center study in which patients will receive low dose targeted busulfan followed by infusion of autologous CD34+ selected bone marrow or mobilized peripheral blood cells transduced with the G2SCID vector. Subjects will be enrolled over 3 years and be followed for 2 years post-infusion on this protocol, then followed long-term on a separate long-term follow-up protocol. Enrollment of subjects will be agreed upon by representatives of both sites. Data will be collected uniformly from both sites through an electronic capture system and key laboratory studies will be centralized. Harvest, cellular manufacturing and infusion will occur at each site using the same SOPs. Key aspects of cellular product characterization will be centralized

    at UCLA

Our lead scientists for X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency research studies include .

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