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Age-related Cognitive Decline clinical trials at University of California Health

2 in progress, 1 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Heartrate and Breathing Effects on Attention and Memory

    open to eligible people ages 50-70

    In the current study, we will examine how daily paced breathing affects plasma amyloid beta levels and the rate of learning in older adults. Healthy adults aged 50-70 who meet all eligibility criteria will be invited to this study. Participants will be randomly assigned to one of the two conditions: 1) Daily memory and attention training followed by a paced breathing protocol designed to increase relaxation or 2) Daily memory and attention training followed by a paced breathing protocol to increase alertness. Participants will be asked to complete pre and post intervention cognitive testing online, engage in 10 weeks of daily brain training (starting Week 2) and 9 weeks of paced breathing (starting Week 3) at home. They will also be asked to come in for lab visits on Weeks 2, 7 and 12 to provide blood and urine samples to assess amyloid beta levels and to complete magnetic resonance imaging scans to assess perivascular space volume.

    at UC Irvine

  • The Active Mind Trial: An Adaptive Randomized Trial to Improve Function and Delay Dementia

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Older adults at risk for dementia show a variety of cognitive deficits, which can be ameliorated by different cognitive training (CT) exercises. The best combination of CT exercises is unknown. The aim is to discover the most efficacious combination of CT exercises as compared to cognitive stimulation (which will serve as a stringent, active control) to modify the functional trajectories of older adults' with MCI, who are at high risk for dementia. The primary objective of the U01 phase is to design and pilot-test an adaptive, randomized clinical trial (RCT) of cognitive training (CT) combinations aimed to enhance performance of instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) among persons with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The longitudinal endpoint goal is reducing incident dementia. The primary aim of the study is to determine which CT combination has the best probability to delay dementia by producing the largest IADL improvements. The study further aims to explore neuroimaging and novel blood-based biomarkers.

    at UCSF

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