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Alcohol Use clinical trials at University of California Health

16 in progress, 7 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • AAT for Alcohol Use Disorder in Veterans

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    The proposed study will test a novel treatment for alcohol use disorders (AUD) to determine if it helps Veterans reduce their hazardous drinking and recover from alcohol-related functional impairments across social, occupational, and domestic domains. To do so, the investigators will evaluate clinical, cognitive, and neural effects of a computer-delivered Approach Avoidance Training (AAT) treatment - which changes implicit tendencies to approach alcohol-related cues - in conjunction with standard VA care. The project will support RR&D's mission to improve Veterans' participation in their lives and community by determining if this innovative alternative technique can improve recovery outcomes for Veterans with AUD and exploring how the intervention works.

    at UCSD

  • Alcoholic Liver Disease and the Gut Microbiome

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Background: Significant sex differences exist in regard to alcohol use disorder (AUD) and alcoholic liver disease (ALD). To date, no studies have examined the brain-gut-microbiome (BGM) axis (which is the relationship between the gut, brain, and the bacteria within the gut) and sex-differences in AUD and ALD. Aims: 1) Demonstrate baseline sex differences in the microbiome and metatranscriptome of AUD and ALD and correlate those differences to severity, 2) determine if these baseline sex differences predicts abstinence or ALD related outcomes, and 3) show how altering the microbiome can decrease the severity of AUD and ALD in a sexdependent manner. Hypothesis: Our project is aimed to explore the hypothesis that sex-related differences of the BGM axis in AUD and ALD explains the variation in patient severity and outcome by sex, and that alterations of the BGM axis can decrease the severity of AUD and ALD in a sex-dependent manner. Methods: A pilot randomized placebo (VSL#3 vs placebo) control trial will be performed in patients with AUD and ALD for 6 months. Questionnaire data, clinical labs, serum, and feces for shotgun metagenomics will be collected at baseline, 3-months, and 6-months. Anticipated Results: Patients with severe AUD/ALD will have more microbes and microbial genes associated with inflammation. These differences will predict outcomes at 6-months and that changes of this baseline microbiome with VSL#3 will lead to more positive outcomes than placebo, with men having greater benefit from VSL#3 than women. Implications and Future Studies: The discovery of the mechanisms underlying sex-related differences in AUD/ALD is needed for the development of personalized recommendations for prevention and treatment in men and women

    at UCLA

  • CM for Patients With ALD After Liver Transplant

    open to eligible people ages 18-99

    Alcohol associated liver disease (ALD) refers to liver injury, such as cirrhosis, that is caused by alcohol use. It affects 2 million adults in the U.S. and is now the leading cause of cirrhosis-related hospitalizations, cirrhosis- related deaths, and liver transplantation. Alcohol use disorder (AUD), the root cause of ALD, affects 15 million Americans each year. While research studies have shown that behavioral therapy and medications specific for alcohol use have helped people overcome their alcohol use disorder, there has not been enough information related to how successful these treatments are specifically for people with ALD. This study will look at a behavioral treatment called "contingency management" (CM) that has shown to be effective with people with other substance use disorders. CM is based on the principles of operant conditioning that involves offering prize-based or monetary incentives to patients with substance use disorders to reduce substance use. This study will look at the efficacy and acceptability of CM in patients who received a liver transplant and have evidence of recurrent alcohol use. The proposed study is a pilot randomized controlled trial of 30 patients with ALD who received a liver transplant; 15 will be randomized to receive a 10-week CM intervention while 15 will receive treatment as usual (TAU or control). Subjects will be asked to complete 12 study visits (including Screening and Baseline Visits) that will last 1 to 2 hours each depending on the visit. All visits will be completed via Zoom. Study staff will instruct participants on how to use Zoom, if necessary. During the Screening and Baseline Visits, subjects will be: 1) asked to provide a urine test and blood draw, 2) complete the SCID-5 AUD, a semi-structured interview guide for making the major DSM-5 diagnoses, 3) complete the Iowa Gambling Test which looks at decision-making skills, 4) complete a survey that looks at the subject's quality of life after liver transplant, 4) review how much alcohol the subject has consumed in the last 30 days, 5) and if the subject has received any current AUD treatments. Once the Screening and Baseline visits are completed, subjects will be randomized to either the CM group or the TAU group. During the weekly visits, subjects will be asked to provide blood and urine samples and will be asked if they have had any alcohol since their last visit. All subjects will receive $20 for completing the visits. For those in the CM group, subjects will also receive a CM reward for negative urine and/or blood tests, depending on which results we receive first-with rewards ranging from $5 to $80 depending on the week. Additionally, during weeks 1, 5, and 10, those in the CM group will also complete the Client Satisfaction Questionnaire-8 to assess client satisfaction with CM and complete a semi-structured interview about the CM protocol as well as CM acceptability and feasibility.

    at UCLA

  • Coronavirus Disease 2019 (Covid-19) Impact on Alcohol-related Liver Disease Patient Outcomes, Care and Alcohol Use

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The study consists of a randomized controlled trial evaluating the efficacy and feasibility of a stepped alcohol treatment using telemedicine on unhealthy alcohol use in patients with chronic liver disease receiving care in hepatology practices at three sites. Patients who meet eligibility criteria will be randomized to one of two study arms: 1) Stepped Alcohol Treatment (SAT) or, 2) Usual Care (UC). Participants will be randomized separately by site. SAT includes 3 sessions of motivational interviewing followed by referral to addiction medicine for patients who do not reduce unhealthy drinking. Trial outcome measures will be complete at 6 and 12 months following baseline enrollment.

    at UCSF

  • EMPOWER AUD Pivotal Trial

    open to eligible people ages 21 years and up

    Multi-site, double-blinded, prospective, randomized, sham-controlled study

    at UCSF

  • Intranasal Oxytocin for the Treatment of Alcohol Use Disorder

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Primary: The primary objective of the study is to compare the efficacy of intranasal oxytocin in reducing the weekly percentage of heavy drinking days over the 10 weeks of maintenance treatment among subjects with moderate to severe Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD). A "heavy drinking day" is 4 or more drinks per drinking day for women and 5 or more drinks per drinking day for men. Secondary: Secondary objectives include assessment of other measures of the effects of oxytocin compared with placebo on reduction of alcohol use as well as effects on psychological assessments, alcohol craving, alcohol-related consequences, cigarette smoking and other nicotine use, retention in the study, safety, and application site (nares) tolerability throughout the study.

    at UCLA

  • Practice Facilitation as a Strategy to Improve Alcohol Treatment Adoption and Implementation in HIV Care

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Despite availability of evidence-based alcohol reduction interventions (EBI), unhealthy alcohol use remains a barrier to HIV medication adherence, viral suppression and retention in HIV care and consequently HIV treatment as prevention (TASP). Guided by complementary implementation and evaluation frameworks-the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) and RE-AIM (Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance), The investigators will conduct a Hybrid Type 3 effectiveness-implementation evaluating implementation trial testing whether practice facilitation, an evidence-based multifaceted implementation strategy increases reach, adoption, implementation, and maintenance of stepped care for unhealthy alcohol use in three Center for AIDS Research (CFAR) Network of Integrated Clinical Systems (CNICS) HIV clinics located in Boston, San Diego, and Chapel Hill. The investigators will secondarily test whether practice facilitation is associated with decreased unhealthy alcohol use, and improved Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) adherence and viral suppression at the patient level. In practice facilitation, a practice coach will offer tools, resources, hands-on guidance, and content expertise to assist sites in offering a stepped care model of alcohol treatment to patients with unhealthy alcohol use. Stepped care will include brief intervention, cognitive behavioral therapy, and alcohol pharmacotherapy. The practice facilitation intervention will be rolled out sequentially across sites. There will be three phases at each site: pre-implementation planning, implementation with formative evaluation, and post-implementation summative evaluation. Using mixed methods, The investigators specifically propose to meet the following specific aims: (Aim 1) Tailor the practice facilitation intervention to each site using mixed methods (pre-implementation); (Aim 2a) Determine the effects of practice facilitation on implementation of stepped care (primary) and alcohol use and HIV-related outcomes (secondary) using interrupted time series analysis with synthetic controls (summative evaluation); (Aim 2b) Determine the effect of practice facilitation on reach, adoption, and maintenance of evidence-based alcohol treatment using mixed methods (formative evaluation); and (Aim 3) Describe barriers and facilitators to implementation of alcohol-related interventions at each site to describe maintenance and inform widespread sustainable implementation.

    at UCSD

  • Heavy Alcohol Use Consumption With Kudzu

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Drinking multiple alcoholic drinks on a single occasion (binge drinking), has many negative health risks but interventions to address this behavior remain limited. This double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial will test whether kudzu, an herbal supplement, can reduce heavy alcohol use and alcohol-associated sexual behaviors among sexually-active, binge-drinking individuals at high risk for HIV infection.

    at UCSF

  • Amplification of Positivity for Alcohol Use Disorder Co-Occurring With Anxiety or Depression

    Sorry, currently not accepting new patients, but might later

    The purpose of this study is to examine the feasibility of a protocol in which individuals with comorbid depression or anxiety disorders and alcohol use disorder will be randomized to complete Amplification of Positivity for Alcohol Use Disorder (AMP-A)- a psychological treatment focused on increasing positive thoughts, emotions, and behaviors- or a traditional cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention. Assessed outcomes will include participant acceptability and completion rates, participant compliance with the intervention, positive and negative affect, substance use- and depression and anxiety-related symptom severity, and functional disability.

    at UCSD

  • Brief Intervention for Alcohol Use Among Injured Patients

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The underlying hypothesis that providing brief interventions to individuals who engage in potentially harmful patterns of alcohol use will alter their drinking behavior and therefore avoid negative consequences. Specifically, this study aims to determine if brief interventions will: 1. Reduce the number of re-admissions and deaths due to injuries associated with alcohol consumption 2. Reduce the number of driving under the influence (DUI) arrests 3. Reduce harmful drinking behavior

    at UC Davis

  • ChangeGradients: Promoting Adolescent Health Behavior Change

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    As most adolescents visit a healthcare provider once a year, health behavior change interventions linked to clinic-based health information technologies hold significant promise for improving healthcare quality and subsequent behavioral health outcomes for adolescents (Baird, 2014, Harris, 2017). Recognizing the potential to leverage recent advances in machine learning and interactive narrative environments, the investigators are now well positioned to design health behavior change systems that extend the reach of clinicians to realize significant impacts on behavior change for adolescent preventive health. The proposed project centers on the design, development, and evaluation of a clinically-integrated health behavior change system for adolescents. CHANGEGRADIENTS will introduce an innovative reinforcement learning-based feedback loop in which adolescent patients interact with personalized behavior change interactive narratives that are dynamically personalized and realized in a rich narrative-centered virtual environment. CHANGEGRADIENTS will iteratively improve its behavior change models using policy gradient methods for Reinforcement Learning (RL) designed to optimize adolescents' achieved behavior change outcomes. This in turn will enable CHANGEGRADIENTS to generate more effective behavior change narratives, which will then lead to further improved behavior change outcomes. With a focus on risky behaviors and an emphasis on alcohol use, adolescents will interact with CHANGEGRADIENTS to develop an experiential understanding of the dynamics and consequences of their alcohol use decisions. The proposed project holds significant transformative potential for (1) producing theoretical and practical advances in how to realize significant impacts on adolescent health behavior change through novel interactive narrative technologies integrated with policy-based reinforcement learning, (2) devising sample-efficient policy gradient methods for RL that produce personalized behavior change experiences by integrating theoretically based models of health behavior change with data-driven models of interactive narrative generation, and (3) promoting new models for integrating personalized health behavior change technologies into clinical care that extend the effective reach of clinicians.

    at UCSF

  • Mobile Mindfulness for Alcohol Use and PTSD Among Veterans

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The purpose of the present study is to develop and test a mobile mindfulness intervention for Alcohol Use Disorder and PTSD among OEF/OIF veterans

    at UCSF

  • Non-invasive Vagal Nerve Stimulation as Novel Treatment to Improve Functional Outcomes in Veterans With Alcohol Use Disorder

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is a major health concern amongst Veterans as it causes functional impairments and decreased quality of life. Current AUD treatments show limited effectiveness in reducing withdrawal-related psychological and physical distress, which drives the urge to drink to relieve these symptoms. The investigators propose the vagus nerve, which is the primary nerve of the "rest and digest" branch of the autonomic nervous system via its bidirectional connections between the brain and the body, as a novel treatment target for AUD. The goal of this study is to assess treatment efficacy and mechanism of action. Noninvasive neuromodulation technologies offer the possibility for innovative, low risk treatments to support the rehabilitation and community reintegration of Veterans with AUD.

    at UCSD

  • Personalized Approach Bias Modification in Heavy Drinking Veterans With Mild to Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The project will examine the neural associations of alcohol approach-bias and investigate the extent to which a neuroscience-based personalized cognitive training program will remediate alcohol approach-bias and improve recovery outcomes among heavy drinking Veterans with alcohol use disorder (AUD) and a history of mild-moderate traumatic brain injury (mmTBI). Alcohol approach-bias modification (ApBM) is a cognitive training intervention designed to interrupt and modify automatic approach processes in response to alcohol cues. Modification of alcohol approach-bias and reductions in heavy alcohol use can be expected to reduce behaviors of self-harm and violence, increase adherence to medical care, reduce drinking-related medical costs, and promote healthier relationships. The long-term goal is to demonstrate the efficacy of ApBM to promote recovery from AUD in Veterans with chronic mmTBI. The investigators also aim to identify neural mechanisms associated with ApBM and other neurocognitive predictors of successful recovery. The evidence garnered from this study will be useful to inform the development of other behavioral and pharmacological treatments for Veterans with AUD with a history of mmTBI.

    at UCSF

  • TACUNA (Traditions and Connections for Urban Native Americans)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This study responds to Request For Application-DA-19-035, HEAL (Helping End Addiction Long Term) initiative: Preventing OUD in Older Adolescents and Young Adults (ages 16-30) by developing and implementing a culturally centered intervention to address opioid use among urban AI/AN emerging adults in California. The primary goal of this study is to compare AI/AN emerging adults who receive TACUNA plus a Wellness Circle (WC) to those AI/AN emerging adults who receive an opioid education workshop on outcomes (e.g., opioid misuse and alcohol and other drug use) over a period of 12 months. TACUNA will be a motivational interviewing group intervention that incorporates traditional practices and discussion of how to cultivate healthy social networks and cultural worlds. The Wellness gathering will be for emerging adults and people in their social network, and will focus on how social networks and cultural connectedness influence healthy behaviors. Opioid education will focus on discussion of opioid misuse within the AI/AN urban community and ways to reduce use in a culturally appropriate manner. Investigators expect those who receive TACUNA + WG will report less opioid and AOD (alcohol and other drug) use frequency, fewer consequences, less time spent around peers who use opioids and AOD, and less perceived prevalence of peer use compared to opioid education over a period of 12 months. Also, investigators will evaluate the intervention's effects on secondary outcomes of social networks and cultural connectedness. Survey data is collected at baseline, 3-months, 6-months and 12-months. Longitudinal analyses will compare intervention participant and control participants on primary and secondary outcomes.

    at UCLA

  • Emergency Medicine Peer Outreach Worker Engagement for Recovery

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This is an observational, prospective case-control study evaluating the effects of an emergency department community health worker-peer recovery specialist program (PCHW), the Substance Misuse Assistance Response Team (SMART). Aims of this study are to 1) understand participant experiences working with a SMART PCHW and identify possible mechanisms for successful recovery linkage; 2) Evaluate SMART effectiveness on patient-centered outcomes, building recovery capital, and recovery linkage; 3) Evaluate SMART implementation and effectiveness on patient outcomes over time. Using a combination of surveys and data linkages to state administrative databases, study investigators will prospectively compare changes in addiction treatment engagement, recovery capital, health related social needs, acute care utilization, and death between people receiving a ED PCHW and those who do not. After consenting to study participation, participants will complete surveys at time of study enrollment and 3 and 6 months after their initial ED visit. Primary outcomes include engagement in addiction treatment, social services engagement, acute care utilization, and mortality will be assessed through linkages to state administrative databases.

    at UCLA

Our lead scientists for Alcohol Use research studies include .