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Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease clinical trials at UC Health
14 in progress, 7 open to new patients

  • Beta-Blockers for the Prevention of Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    open to eligible people ages 40-84

    This is a multicenter, prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial that will enroll 1028 patients with at least moderately severe COPD over a three year period and follow them at regular intervals for one year. The primary endpoint is time to first acute exacerbation. Secondary endpoints include rates and severity of COPD exacerbations, cardiovascular events, all-cause mortality, lung function, dyspnea, quality of life and metoprolol-related side effects.

    at UCSF UCLA

  • Experimental Treatment With the "Hemolung" for Patients With COPD Hospitalized for Sudden and Severe Breathing Difficulty

    “This study will test the good and bad effects of using a new medical device called the Hemolung for patients with COPD.”

    open to eligible people ages 22 years and up

    This study evaluates the safety and efficacy of using the Hemolung RAS to provide low-flow extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO2R) as an alternative or adjunct to invasive mechanical ventilation for patients who require respiratory support due to an acute exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). It is hypothesized that the Hemolung RAS can be safely used to avoid or reduce time on invasive mechanical ventilation compared to COPD patients treated with standard-of-care mechanical ventilation alone. Eligible patients will be randomized to receive lung support with either the Hemolung RAS plus standard-of-care mechanical ventilation, or standard-of-care mechanical ventilation alone.

    at UC Davis

  • Impact of Non-invasive Ventilation in Hypercapnic COPD

    open to eligible people ages 45-75

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a highly prevalent condition worldwide and is a cause of substantial morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, few therapies have been shown to improve survival. The importance of systemic effects and co-morbidities in COPD has garnered attention based on the observation that many patients with COPD die from causes other than respiratory failure, including a large proportion from cardiovascular causes. Recently, two high profile randomized trials have shown substantial improvements in morbidity and mortality with use of nocturnal non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in COPD patients with hypercapnia. Although the mechanisms by which NIV improves outcomes remain unclear, the important benefits of NIV might be cardiovascular via a number of mechanisms. In contrast to prior trials of NIV in COPD that did not show substantial benefit, a distinguishing feature of these encouraging recent NIV clinical trials was a prominent reduction of hypercapnia, which might be a maker or mediator of effective therapy. Alternatively, improvements might be best achieved by targeting a different physiological measure. Additional mechanistic data are therefore needed to inform future trials and achieve maximal benefit of NIV. Recent work in cardiovascular biomarkers has identified high-sensitivity troponin to have substantial ability to determine cardiovascular stress in a variety of conditions - even with only small changes. In COPD, a number of observational studies have shown that high-sensitivity troponin increases with worsening disease severity, and that levels increase overnight during sleep. This biomarker therefore presents a promising means to study causal pathways regarding the effect of NIV in patients with COPD. With this background, the investigator's overall goals are: 1) To determine whether the beneficial effect of non-invasive ventilation might be due to a reduction in cardiovascular stress, using established cardiovascular biomarkers, and 2) To define whether a reduction in PaCO2 (or alternative mechanism) is associated with such an effect.

    at UCSD

  • INtervention Study In overweiGHT Patients With COPD

    open to eligible people ages 40 years and up

    Symptoms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and high body mass index (BMI) overlap. The investigators are trying to find out if a program proven to help people lose a modest amount of weight and increase their physical activity will improve COPD symptoms for those with a high BMI. The program uses a series of digital video discs (DVD) sessions focused on healthy eating and physical activity, and encourages participants to monitor their weight, diet, and physical activity for two years. For those who want to, they will be able to work with a health coach to help meet weight and activity goals. We hope that the program will lead to weight loss, better exercise tolerance, and less shortness of breath. To be in the study, participants will need to have COPD, high BMI, history of smoking, shortness of breath, and be at least 40 years old.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Pathophysiology of the Upper Airway in Patients With COPD and Concomitant OSA

    open to eligible people ages 40-70

    The purpose of study is to evaluate the physiologic effects of pulmonary tissue/structural changes associated with COPD and upper airway inflammation on upper airway collapsibility. Upper airway collapsibility is closely associated with development of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), which is a common disease characterized by repetitive collapse of upper airway during sleep, leading to hypoxemia and arousal. OSA has important neurocognitive and cardiovascular consequences, especially in patients with COPD. Participants in this research study will undergo two overnight sleep studies (PSGs), pulmonary function test, and CT scan of the upper airway and chest. The first sleep study will evaluate the sleep breathing disorder and the second sleep study will measure the upper airway collapsibility, called critical closing pressure (Pcrit). Pcrit is measured by a modified continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machine which can provide a wide range of pressures between 20 and -20 cmH2O in order to modify upper airway pressure.

    at UCSD

  • Rehabilitation in Safety-net Settings for Patients With COPD

    open to eligible people ages 40-95

    This study will examine COPD Wellness, a 10-week low-intensity pulmonary rehabilitation program consisting of group and home exercise, education, and social support can improve symptoms and increase physical activity in participants with COPD who receive care within a 'safety-net' healthcare system (e.g. County Hospital). Half of the participants will also receive an adherence strategy targeted at addressing unmet social needs, while the other half will undergo the intervention without the adherence strategy.

    at UCSF

  • RETHINC: REdefining THerapy In Early COPD for the Pulmonary Trials Cooperative

    open to eligible people ages 40-80

    The study hypothesis is that symptomatic current and former smokers with spirometric values within the normal range (post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC≥0.70 and post-BD FVC ≥ 70% predicted will still derive symptomatic benefit from long-acting bronchodilator therapy even though they are excluded from current GOLD guideline recommendations.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • A 12-week Study Treating Participants Who Have alpha1-antitrypsin-related COPD With Alvelestat (MPH966) or Placebo.

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of alvelestat (an oral neutrophil elastase inhibitor) on blood and sputum biomarkers in patients with Pizz or null genotype alpha-1 anti-trypsin deficient lung disease. Change in a number of different blood and sputum biomarkers related to lung damage, inflammation and elastase activity will be measured over a 12 week period. The effect on lung function and respiratory symptoms will also be measured.

    at UC Davis

  • Examining the Genetic Factors That May Cause Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a long-term lung disease that is often caused by cigarette smoking. The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether certain genetic factors predispose some smokers to develop COPD more than others.

    at UCSD

  • Longitudinal Follow up to Assess Biomarkers Predictive of Emphysema Progression in Patients With COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease)

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The study will include 60 healthy subjects (ex-smoker without any airflow limitation), 125 COPD GOLD (global initiative for chronic obstructive lung disease) I , 125 COPD GOLD II, 125 COPD GOLD III and up to 20 patients with COPD and A1AT (Alpha1-Antitrypsin) deficiency (ZZ genotype). Soluble and imaging biomarkers will be investigated addressing different aspects of disease pathways postulated to be relevant for COPD progression.

    at UCSD UCLA

  • Pulmonary Specialist-Health Coach Consult Model Pilot

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    The Pulmonary Specialist-Health Coach Consultation (PuSHCon) study examines the implemention of health coach-assisted consultations to improve access to specialist care and implementation of specialist recommendations for patients with COPD, asthma, and asthma COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS) for low-income and vulnerable patients seen at public health clinics. A limited number of patients (50) from two clinics will be enrolled in the pilot study; 25 patients from one clinic will receive a pulmonary consultation under usual care and 25 patients from the other clinic will receive the PuSHCon model.

    at UCSF

  • Right Ventricular Hemodynamics Using Cardiac MRI in Patients COPD and OSA

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The coexistence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in the same patient has been termed overlap syndrome, affecting 1% of the U.S. population.The investigators propose to conduct this study that aims: (1) to compare right and left ventricular hemodynamic parameters using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in overlap syndrome vs. COPD only and OSA only; (2) to compare the effects of bi-level positive airway pressure (BPAP) vs. nocturnal oxygen therapy (NOT) on right ventricular (RV) hemodynamics in overlap syndrome. This study will allow us to test the hypothesis: (1) Patients with overlap syndrome have more RV dysfunction than those with COPD only or OSA only; (2) treatment of both hypoxemia and hypercapnia during sleep will improve RV hemodynamics compared with treatment of hypoxemia alone in patients with overlap syndrome.

    at UCSD

  • Study of Automated Care Pathway for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    This is a fully automated randomized trial with two randomization branch-points. The first is inclusion of disease-specific orders in the admission orders based on a predictive model using real-time data. The second is the use of dynamic orders that are end-user tested rather than static orders designed by a committee. The primary hypothesis is that automatic inclusion of disease specific orders with admission orders will improve adherence to guidelines for patients with COPD. The secondary hypothesis is that clinical and operational outcomes will improve, thereby improving value.

    at UCSF

  • Study of COPD Subgroups and Biomarkers

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    SPIROMICS was initially funded through contracts from the NIH. That phase of SPIROMICS is now referred to as SPIROMICS I. SPIROMICS is now funded as a grant from the NIH. The current phase is referred to as SPIROMICS II. Brief summary of SPIROMICS I: The purpose of SPIROMICS is to learn about chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which is sometimes called emphysema or chronic bronchitis. Millions of Americans have COPD, and it is the fourth leading cause of death in the country. The most common cause of COPD is cigarette smoking, although not all smokers get COPD. The discovery of new treatments for COPD has been slowed by a poor understanding of different types of COPD and a lack of ways to measure whether or not COPD is getting worse. The study has two main goals. The first is to find groups of patients with COPD who share certain characteristics. Certain groups may respond differently to certain treatments. The second is to find new ways of measuring whether or not COPD is getting worse. This would provide new ways of testing whether a new treatment is working. SPIROMICS has three substudies and two ancillary studies. Substudies: 1. Repeatability Substudy: The entire baseline clinic visit will be repeated on 100 volunteers. The goal of this substudy is to determine reliability of measurement procedures. 2. Bronchoscopy Substudy: 300 participants will be enrolled for two additional study visits, including a bronchoscopy. The goal of this substudy is to collect and assess biological specimens and relate those results to clinical measurements. 3. Exacerbation Substudy: Up to 400 participants will be enrolled in this substudy. A daily symptom diary will be collected on all participants. Participants will also be seen in the clinic during a pulmonary exacerbation. The goals of this substudy are to 1) better understand the relationship between symptoms and exacerbations and 2) obtain clinical data and specimens during a pulmonary exacerbation. Ancillary Studies: 1. Air Pollution Ancillary Study: The SPIROMICS Air Pollution ancillary study uses state-of-the art air pollution exposure assessments to determine individual-level outdoor and indoor air pollution exposure. The goals of this substudy are to determine the effect of long-term air pollution exposure on COPD morbidity and to determine whether short-term changes in outdoor air pollution are associated with changes in COPD morbidity. 2. Parametric Response Mapping in COPD: The Parametric Response Mapping (PRM) in COPD ancillary study collects an additional CT scan during the final study visit and uses a new analysis technique (PRM) to assess the functional small airways of the lung and emphysema. Brief summary of SPIROMICS II: Aim 1 is to define the natural history of "Smokers with symptoms despite preserved spirometry" and characterize the airway mucus abnormalities underlying this condition. Aim 2 is to determine the radiographic precursor lesion(s) for emphysema, and identify the molecular phenotypes underlying airway disease and emphysema. Aim 3 is to advance understanding of the biology of COPD exacerbations through analysis of predisposing baseline phenotypes, exacerbation triggers and host inflammatory response. SPIROMICS II will continue follow-up of current participants, with no new enrollment. Each participant will have one clinic visit and will be contacted by telephone every 4 months.

    at UCLA UCSF

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