Skip to main content

Cognitive Decline clinical trials at University of California Health

4 in progress, 2 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Join Our Vitamin D and Brain Health Study!

    “Seniors can help researchers test how vitamin D might improve brain health!”

    open to eligible people ages 65-90

    This Phase II randomized clinical trial aims to test if supplementation with high dose oral vitamin D will successfully correct vitamin D insufficiency, compared to treatment with standard (RDA) dose vitamin D in a diverse community-based elderly cohort. The effect of high-dose vs. standard-dose vitamin D on altering cognitive trajectories will also be assessed and data will be expected to be used in designing a potential definitive Phase III trial in elderly groups at risk for dementia. A total of 180 elderly persons with longitudinal biomarkers, neuropsychological testing and brain MRI scans will be enrolled, with 152 (~50 with MCI, 50 with mild AD and 50 with no cognitive impairment) expected to complete the 3½-year study. One-half of each diagnostic group will be randomized to treatment with high-dose vitamin D3 (4,000 IU daily) or to standard dose Vitamin D (600 IU capsule daily + ~200 IU dietary = ~800 IU total/day). Longitudinal MRI analyses will provide an estimate of the treatment effect size on brain atrophy rate. Vitamin D receptor genotype polymorphisms and their impact on response to oral supplementation will also be examined. If vitamin D supplementation improves cognitive outcome, this could have a large impact on the public health, since low vitamin D status is a common, readably treatable condition which may provide a novel window to prevent dementia and AD. Furthermore, the higher prevalence of AD and dementia in African Americans and Latinos could be partially attributable to vitamin D insufficiency.

    at UC Davis

  • MRI and PET Biomarkers for Cognitive Decline in Older Adults

    open to eligible people ages 60-85

    The purpose of this research study is to understand the factors that underlie changes in thinking and memory with increasing age. The investigators will test the usefulness of MRI, PET, and cognitive testing in detecting subtle changes in the brain that precede cognitive decline. An addendum to this study includes additional PET scans to examine the relationship between tau protein in the brain and cognitive decline. Tau is a protein that is known to form tangles in the areas of the brain important for memory, and these tau tangles are a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. This sub-study research aims to look at the tau accumulation in the brain using an investigational drug called MK-6240, which is a radio tracer that gets injected prior to a positron emission tomography (PET) scan.

    at UC Irvine

  • Correlation Between Montreal Cognitive Assessment and Voice Therapy Outcomes in the Aging Treatment- Seeking Population

    Sorry, accepting new patients by invitation only

    This study will investigate if the performance on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) is associated or predictive of the outcomes in voice, swallowing or upper airway therapy in the older laryngology treatment seeking patients. The relationship between the scores of MoCA and parameters in therapy will be analyzed. The outcomes of this study could potentially impact how investigators determine candidacy for therapy and develop patient treatment plans to meet their needs. This is a collaborative study with Emory Voice Center and the NYU Voice Center.

    at UCSF

  • Efficacy of a Multimodal Brain Health Intervention for Older African Americans

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This study tests the feasibility, acceptability, and efficacy of a multimodal intervention (walking, social engagement, and reminiscence), including the use of wearable digital biomarkers, for cognitively healthy and mildly cognitively impaired African Americans aged 65 and older.

    at UC Davis

Our lead scientists for Cognitive Decline research studies include .

Last updated: