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Cognitive Impairment clinical trials at UC Health

10 in progress, 7 open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Brain Health in Breast Cancer Survivors

    open to eligible females ages 35-65

    Endocrine therapy (ET) is widely used to treat hormone receptor positive breast cancer and prevent recurrence by downregulating estrogen function. However, ETs readily cross the blood brain barrier and interfere with the action of estrogen in the brain. Estrogen supports cognition and menopausal status is closely linked to cognitive health in women. This has raised concern that anti-estrogen ETs may affect cognition and brain health in breast cancer survivors. However, evidence across existing studies is inconsistent and these effects remain poorly understood. The incomplete understanding of the effects of ET are likely due to limitations of earlier studies - namely, the under-appreciation of the role of menopausal status and insensitivity of standard cognitive measures. This research project will address these earlier limitations by specifically comparing ET effects by menopausal status, and using highly sensitive, task-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measures to assess the effects of ET on brain function.

    at UCLA

  • Carotid Revascularization and Medical Management for Asymptomatic Carotid Stenosis Trial - Hemodynamics (CREST-H)

    open to eligible people ages 35-86

    We aim to determine whether cognitive impairment attributable to cerebral hemodynamic impairment in patients with high-grade asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis is reversible with restoration of flow. To accomplish this aim CREST-H will add on to the NINDS-sponsored CREST-2 trial (parallel, outcome-blinded Phase 3 clinical trials for patients with asymptomatic high-grade carotid artery stenosis which will compare carotid endarterectomy plus intensive medical management (IMM) versus IMM alone (n=1,240), and carotid artery stenting plus IMM versus IMM alone (n=1,240) to prevent stroke and death). CREST-H addresses the intriguing question of whether cognitive impairment can be reversed when it arises from abnormal cerebral hemodynamic perfusion in a hemodynamically impaired subset of the CREST-2 -randomized patients. We will enroll 500 patients from CREST-2, all of whom receive cognitive assessments at baseline and yearly thereafter. We anticipate identifying 100 patients with hemodynamic impairment as measured by an inter-hemispheral MRI perfusion "time to peak" (TTP) delay on the side of stenosis. Among those who are found to be hemodynamically impaired and have baseline cognitive impairment, the cognitive batteries at baseline and at 1 year will determine if those with flow failure who are randomized to a revascularization arm in CREST-2 will have better cognitive outcomes than those in the medical-only arm compared with this treatment difference for those who have no flow failure. We hypothesize that hemodynamically significant "asymptomatic" carotid disease may represent one of the few examples of treatable causes of cognitive impairment. If cognitive decline can be reversed in these patients, then we will have established a new indication for carotid revascularization independent of the risk of recurrent stroke.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Cognitive Training Delivered Remotely to Individuals With Psychosis (ROAM)

    open to eligible people ages 18-60

    Primary study: This study is a single-site, double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial to compare an evidence-based structured program of 30-35 hours of on-line cognitive and social cognitive training exercises performed over 16 weeks (~2 hours per week), delivered with an innovative digital app which provides users with a motivation coach to set personalized goals and with secure social networking for peer support, "PRIME" ; vs. 2) A control condition of computer games, encouraged at ~2 hours per week over 16 weeks, delivered with "PRIME". Unblinded Cognitive Training Sub-Study: Participants who were randomized to the computer games arm of the trial may be offered access to the active cognitive training at the end of their 6 month follow up appointments, if they still meet inclusion criteria. PRIME Super Users Sub-Study: Participants who have provided all follow up data to the initial study, including those who are currently enrolled in the Unblinded Cognitive Training sub-study, may be offered continued participation in the PRIME community as super-users.

    at UCSF

  • Low Intensity Focused Ultrasound for Emotion Regulation

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    Amygdala is highly involved in emotional response, emotional reactivity and anxiety. Amygdala functions are therefore involved in a wide range of psychiatric disorders including generalized and social anxiety, specific phobia, obsessive compulsive disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder. Therefore, potential clinical implications of amygdala stimulation are great. However, to date, such efforts have been limited by the inability of non-invasive neuromodulation techniques (e.g. transcranial magnetic stimulation - TMS) to reach the amygdala and the highly invasive (i.e. neurosurgical) nature of methods (e.g. deep brain stimulation - DBS) which can, but to our knowledge has rarely been used, target these areas. In order to overcome these current limitations, study invesitgators propose the use of low intensity focused ultrasound pulsation (LIFUP) to affect amygdala activity to improve emotion regulation.

    at UCLA

  • Low Intensity Focused Ultrasound for Learning and Memory

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    Hippocampus and medial temporal lobe (MTL)-dependent memory is impacted by a wide range of psychiatric and neurologic conditions. These cognitive limitations often result in limited functional abilities for patients. Currently available pharmacologic and behavioral treatments are somewhat controversial and have minimal evidence-based effectiveness. Recently, deep brain stimulation was used to modulate MTL activity and subsequently improve memory performance. However, such implantable devices require neurosurgery with major associated health risk. At present, there are no publications reporting non-invasive neurostimulation targeting MTL regions to improve memory. The central hypothesis of this project is that non-invasive, low intensity focused ultrasound pulsation (LIFUP) can selectively increase regional MTL activity and thus be used as a cognitive neural prosthetic capable of improving memory performance. The aims of this study focus on whether LIFUP can increased blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) activation in the entorhinal cortex and functionally associated regions, whether this increased activation is greater using short train or long train LIFUP parameters, and whether this LIFUP-induced activation, when applied during learning, results in improved memory.

    at UCLA

  • MRI and PET Biomarkers for Cognitive Decline in Older Adults

    open to eligible people ages 60-85

    The purpose of this research study is to understand the factors that underlie changes in thinking and memory with increasing age. The investigators will test the usefulness of MRI, PET, and cognitive testing in detecting subtle changes in the brain that precede cognitive decline. An addendum to this study includes additional PET scans to examine the relationship between tau protein in the brain and cognitive decline. Tau is a protein that is known to form tangles in the areas of the brain important for memory, and these tau tangles are a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. This sub-study research aims to look at the tau accumulation in the brain using an investigational drug called MK-6240, which is a radio tracer that gets injected prior to a positron emission tomography (PET) scan.

    at UC Irvine

  • Non-invasive Transcranial Electrical Stimulation in MS

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    The goal is to investigate the effects of non-invasive transcranial electrical stimulation on cognition in MS.

    at UCSF

  • A Follow-On Study of Donanemab (LY3002813) With Video Assessments in Participants With Alzheimer's Disease (TRAILBLAZER-EXT)

    Sorry, not currently recruiting here

    The main goals of this study are to further determine whether the study drug donanemab is safe and effective in participants with Alzheimer's disease and to validate video scale assessments.

    at UC Irvine

  • Effect of NAC on Preventing Chemo-Related Cognitive Impairments in Ovarian Ca Pts Treated W/ PBT

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This is a phase I, dose-escalation and phase II dose-expansion clinical trial determining the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and safety and tolerability of adding N-Acetyl-Cysteine (NAC) to ovarian cancer patients who are receiving a platinum-based therapy (PBT). This study will investigate whether NAC will mitigate chemotherapy-related cognitive impairment (CRCI).

    at UC Irvine

  • Napping, Sleep, Cognitive Decline and Risk of Alzheimer's Disease

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    This study aimed to pilot test a non-pharmacological (behavioral) treatment program targeting improved cognition through improving 24-h sleep-wake cycle in people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or mild Alzheimer's disease. A treatment program incorporating bright light therapy and a modified cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia will be developed to address 24-hour patterns of sleep. We will then pilot test its feasibility and explore its preliminary effects on improving sleep/napping and cognition in patients with MCI or mild Alzheimer's disease.

    at UCSF

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