Skip to main content

Dysplasia clinical trials at UC Health
9 in progress, 2 open to eligible people

  • A Cohort Study of the Intestinal Microbiota of Premature Infants

    open to all eligible people

    Premature infants are at risk for a variety of diseases, the investigators would like to learn more about why some premature babies are at higher risk and some are protected from these diseases. Scientists at UC Davis and other universities have developed new ways to measure the bacteria and a large number of small molecules in specimens of infant blood, urine, stomach fluid and poop and in mother's milk. These discoveries allow us to consider questions that were impossible to answer before these new techniques were developed. One such question is whether the bacteria in the poop of a premature baby can help us predict the baby's risk for developing infection or a common and serious disease of premature infants called necrotizing enterocolitis. A second question is whether the DNA of a premature baby (obtained from saliva with a q-tip) can predict higher risk for diseases of premature babies.

    at UC Davis

  • Normative Radiographic Parameters and Growth Curve of Hips Less Than Six Weeks of Gestational Age Using Ultrasound

    open to all eligible people

    This study aims to collect normative population data on the ultrasound radiographic parameters used to evaluate hip dysplasia in infants between 32 and 46 weeks of gestational age. This data would be utilized to develop a growth chart with standard deviations for this cohort that would be beneficial in the appropriate treatment of suspected hip dysplasia.

    at UCSF

  • Anal Cytology Collection Procedures in Predicting High-Grade Anal Dysplasia in Men Who Have Sex With Men

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This clinical trial compares three anal cytology collection procedures (collected at a single visit) in men who have sex with men (MSM). It also compares two different tests for human papilloma virus, the virus that causes high grade anal dysplasia, which is thought to occur before anal cancer. This study may help doctors develop better screening for high-grade anal dysplasia in MSM in order to identify those who need to return for additional screening and treatment.

    at UCLA

  • Barrett's Dysplasia Detection Pilot Trial Using the NvisionVLE® Imaging System

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The NvisionVLE® Dysplasia Detection Pilot Study is a prospective, non-randomized trial for participants who have a prior biopsy-confirmed diagnosis of BE with dysplasia and are scheduled to have an endoscopic evaluation of your esophagus for BE surveillance by a standard procedure called EGD (esophagogastroduodenoscopy) as well as an imaging procedure called VLE (volumetric laser endomicroscopy).

    at UC Irvine

  • Extension Study of XLHED-Affected Male Subjects Treated With EDI200 in Protocol ECP-002

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The goal of the ECP-002e extension study is to continue the evaluation of all EDI200-treated ECP-002 subjects up to age 10 yrs. No additional study drug administration is planned. The efficacy evaluations will incorporate growth and development parameters, frequency of infections and hospitalizations, and age-appropriate assessments of ectoderm-derived organ function. The safety evaluations will include physical examinations, adverse events and concomitant medication documentation, and laboratory testing. Funding Source - FDA OOPD

    at UCSF

  • Hydrocortisone for BPD

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The Hydrocortisone and Extubation study will test the safety and efficacy of a 10 day course of hydrocortisone for infants who are less than 30 weeks estimated gestational age and who are intubated at 14-28 days of life. Infants will be randomized to receive hydrocortisone or placebo. This study will determine if hydrocortisone improves infants'survival without moderate or severe BPD and will be associated with improvement in survival without moderate or severe neurodevelopmental impairment at 22 - 26 months corrected age.

    at UCLA

  • Peri-operative Use of a Pain Injection in Pediatric Patients With Cerebral Palsy

    Sorry, not yet accepting patients

    Pain management in pediatric patients presents a difficult challenge. Unlike adults, pediatric patients often cannot communicate their pain management needs clearly. Adequate pain control after surgery is pivotal for these patients in order to prevent negative physiologic and psychologic complications and to improve surgical outcomes. There is an ongoing shift away from the use of opioids in the post-operative setting due to both their negative side effects and their high potential for dependence and abuse. A variety of new techniques of multimodal pain management have been developed and utilized in elective orthopaedic procedures. Injection of local anesthetics is becoming a widely popular technique utilized in adult arthroplasty. This technique blocks pain directly at the site of injection, and therefore can improve post-operative pain while minimizing side effects. Evidence has demonstrated this technique to be both safe and effective, resulting in reduced opioid consumption post-operatively. However, this technique has not been studied for use in pediatric patients, a population in which reduced narcotic use is equally, if not more important than in adult patients. This study is a prospective, randomized controlled trial with 2 parallel arms. The goal of this study is to assess the efficacy of a surgical-site pain injection administered in pediatric patients with cerebral palsy undergoing major hip surgery. Patients who are scheduled to undergo surgery will be randomized to either intervention (injection of a pain cocktail) or placebo (injection of normal saline). The pain cocktail includes three medications: ropivacaine (a local anesthetic), ketorolac (an anti-inflammatory medication), and epinephrine (a medication to constrict blood vessels and increase the duration of action of any co-administered medications). A surgeon who is blinded to treatment group will administer the injection at the end of the procedure, prior to the patient waking from anesthesia. The injection is in addition to our typical multi-modal pain control protocol, which includes epidural anesthesia, acetaminophen, anti-inflammatories, oral narcotics and anti-spasmodic agents. Patients will then be monitored post-operatively and pain medication consumption (both while in the hospital post-operatively and for the first two weeks following discharge), patient-reported and/or nurse-recorded pain scores, length of hospital stay, and adverse effects will be recorded. At the first post-operative visit, patients' parents will be asked to complete a survey designed to assess parent satisfaction with their child's pain management after surgery. Patients, parents, and surgeons will be blinded to treatment group allocation. Data will be collected while the patient is in the hospital, after surgery (average duration 3-4 days), and at the first post-operative visit two to three weeks after surgery.

    at UCLA

  • Transfusion of Prematures Trial

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    The objective of the TOP trial is to determine whether higher hemoglobin thresholds for transfusing ELBW infants resulting in higher hemoglobin levels lead to improvement in the primary outcome of survival and rates of neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI) at 22-26 months of age, using standardized assessments by Bayley.

    at UCLA

  • Vosaroxin and Infusional Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Sorry, in progress, not accepting new patients

    This phase II trial studies how well vosaroxin and cytarabine work in treating patients with untreated acute myeloid leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vosaroxin and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.

    at UCLA

Last updated: